terça-feira, 7 de outubro de 2014

Colorful Glass House Sculpture Dazzles in New York


Check out those rainbow reflections! For this year's DUMBO Arts Festival, artist Tom Fruin and performance duo CoreAct presented a collaborative project called Reflection / Kolonihavehus in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Fruin's colorful plexiglass house, called Kolonihavehus, was on display. In previous years, the outdoor sculpture had been shown throughout Europe, such as in Sweden, Denmark, Austria and the Czech  Republic.















New York had already seen one of Fruin's pieces, the monumental sculpture, Watertower. In the series, called Icon, Fruin uses plexiglass and steel that's been reclaimed and recycled to construct some truly dazzling works.
Above photo credit: Axel Taferner

Photo credit: Picture This Photography
Photo credit: iamtomchang
Photo credit: reyes837
Tom Fruin's website
fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti
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200,000 year old Stone Age tools found in Chhattisgarh

The prehistoric stone implements like scrapper, points, lunate, blade, clever and burin were found scattered in an area spread over 100 acres in the village of Sahaspur under Dhumda block in Chhattisgarh’s Bemetera district by archaeologist J.R. Bhagat recently.

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In a sensational archaeological discovery, Stone Age implements, believed to be 200,000 years old, were found at a prehistoric site in Chhattisgarh.




“Both finished and unfinished tools and debitages were found scattered throughout the site,” Mr Bhagat, who had a year ago discovered a 3,000-year-old city buried under the soil in Tarighat, nearly 30 km from here, disclosed to this newspaper on Sunday.

“It was an accidental discovery. I came across Stone Age tools at the prehistoric site during my recent visit to a state-protected archaeological site in Sahaspur, 65 km from Raipur,” he said.

According to him, techno-typological study of the tools has indicated that the artefacts belonged to Middle and Upper Palaeolithic periods (2 lakhs to 40,000 years old). Some of them date back to Mesolithic period (10,000 years old). “This may be the biggest reserve of Stone Age tools found in one site in the whole of central India so far. Hence, it may be the largest prehistoric site in Central India,” Mr Bhagat revealed.

The newly-discovered site is located on the bank of an ancient water channel christened as Khujri, a tributary of river Sheonath.

The site is hardly 500 metres from a state-protected site housing a group of shrines dating back to 13th-14th century AD. 


Significantly, exploration of the site has indicated that it was a manufacturing hub of Stone Age tools.

“Huge blocks of stones containing flake marks were found at the site. Besides, a large number of cores were also noticed in the patch. This clearly suggests that it was a major manufacturing hub of Stone Age implements,” Mr Bhagat said.
 
 
fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.asianage.com/india/200000-year-old-stone-age-tools-found-chhattisgarh-620

MoMA Enacting Timed Ticket Policy to Deal With Massive Crowds for Matisse

Henri Matisse’s Horse, Rider and Clown (Courtesy, the Tate).

When “Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs” opened at the Tate Modern in April, Tate director Sir Nicholas Serota called it a “once-in-a-lifetime” show. He said it may be “the most evocative and compelling show that London has ever seen.” He said there would be crowds and crowds of people.

And, oh, were there ever. “The Cut-Outs” drew more than half a million people, more than any show in the Tate’s history.





So, now that the blockbuster exhibition has moved to New York, the Museum of Modern Art is not taking any chances. In order to make sure attendees swarm the museum, MoMA will require Matisse fans to buy tickets allowing them to enter the show only at a certain time. The show doesn’t open until Sunday, but slots are already selling out.

A MoMA spokesperson says the policy has only been enacted for two shows in recent years: the retrospective of filmmaker Tim Burton in 2009, and “Van Gogh and the Colors of the Night” in 2008. The show of Mr. Burton’s film sets and illustrations drew over 800,000 visitors, so clearly some regulation was needed.


Henri Matisse, The Cut Outs (Catalogue Courtesy The Tate).

“The Cut-Outs” features works Matisse created in his later years, when he transitioned into using scissor-cut paper as his primary medium. This reporter is quite excited.

You can snap up tickets right here. They cost $25 for adults, and hopefully they’ll prevent what would have been a mosh pit of Matisse fans on 53rd Street. You can also look into becoming a member, to get into one of those member openings. Act fast.

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti  http://observer.com/2014/10/moma-enacting-timed-ticket-policy-to-deal-with-massive-crowds-for-matisse/#ixzz3FVGb0lIZ

UNESCO seeks answers from Egypt on more than 4,600-year-old 'damaged' pyramid

A file picture taken on September 16, 2014 shows a policeman standing near the step pyramid of Djoser at the ancient Egyptian Saqqara necropolis some 20 kilometres south of Cairo. UNESCO has asked Egypt for a detailed report on restoration work carried out at the Djoser pyramid following reports the more than 4,600-year-old monument has been damaged, an official of the UN agency said today. 
 
 
AFP PHOTO/ MOHAMED EL-SHAHED. 
 
Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on email Share on print Share on gmail More Sharing Services 0 CAIRO (AFP).- UNESCO has asked Egypt for a detailed report on restoration work carried out at the Djoser pyramid following reports the more than 4,600-year-old monument has been damaged, an official of the UN agency said Wednesday. 
 
Egyptian media reported earlier this month that the pyramid, which dominates the necropolis of Saqqara, southwest of Cairo, has been damaged during the restoration work. "The UNESCO World Heritage Centre sent a letter to the ministry of antiquities requesting a detailed technical report on the work," said Tamar Teneishvili, a senior official of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation in Cairo. "This request was made after information gathered from the media," Teneishvili told AFP. She said UNESCO would wait for the ministry's report to decide on its future plans. UNESCO has also asked if its own 2011 recommendations on the restoration of the pyramid had been followed. 
 
Several Egyptian NGOs have criticised the restoration work, saying the monument's original facade has been altered. Some specialists have also said that the company hired to do the restoration work, Al-Shurbagy, does not have the necessary experience. Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damati has rejected the criticism as "baseless". Last week, he told a group of journalists invited to see the ongoing restoration that the "work is underway without a problem". The executive director of the project, Michel Ghobrial Farid, has also rejected the criticism, saying the pyramid's appearance was restored the way it was at the time of its construction. The reconstruction project started in 2006 but was interrupted in February 2013 due to a lack of funding. The tomb, built by the master architect Imhotep for the Pharoah Djoser, stood 62 metres (203 feet) tall originally and is considered the oldest building in the world built entirely of stone.

Fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://artdaily.com/news/73106/UNESCO-seeks-answers-from-Egypt-on-more-than-4-600-year-old--damaged--pyramid-#.VDPx1Fes-_I[/url]Copyright%20%C2%A9%20artdaily.org[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

CAIRO (AFP).- UNESCO has asked Egypt for a detailed report on restoration work carried out at the Djoser pyramid following reports the more than 4,600-year-old monument has been damaged, an official of the UN agency said Wednesday. Egyptian media reported earlier this month that the pyramid, which dominates the necropolis of Saqqara, southwest of Cairo, has been damaged during the restoration work. "The UNESCO World Heritage Centre sent a letter to the ministry of antiquities requesting a detailed technical report on the work," said Tamar Teneishvili, a senior official of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation in Cairo. "This request was made after information gathered from the media," Teneishvili told AFP. She said UNESCO would wait for the ministry's report to decide on its future plans. UNESCO has also asked if its own 2011 recommendations on the restoration of the pyramid had been followed. Several Egyptian NGOs have criticised the restoration work, saying the monument's original facade has been altered. Some specialists have also said that the company hired to do the restoration work, Al-Shurbagy, does not have the necessary experience. Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damati has rejected the criticism as "baseless". Last week, he told a group of journalists invited to see the ongoing restoration that the "work is underway without a problem". The executive director of the project, Michel Ghobrial Farid, has also rejected the criticism, saying the pyramid's appearance was restored the way it was at the time of its construction. The reconstruction project started in 2006 but was interrupted in February 2013 due to a lack of funding. The tomb, built by the master architect Imhotep for the Pharoah Djoser, stood 62 metres (203 feet) tall originally and is considered the oldest building in the world built entirely of stone.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/73106/UNESCO-seeks-answers-from-Egypt-on-more-than-4-600-year-old--damaged--pyramid-#.VDPx1Fes-_I[/url]Copyright%20%C2%A9%20artdaily.org[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
CAIRO (AFP).- UNESCO has asked Egypt for a detailed report on restoration work carried out at the Djoser pyramid following reports the more than 4,600-year-old monument has been damaged, an official of the UN agency said Wednesday. Egyptian media reported earlier this month that the pyramid, which dominates the necropolis of Saqqara, southwest of Cairo, has been damaged during the restoration work. "The UNESCO World Heritage Centre sent a letter to the ministry of antiquities requesting a detailed technical report on the work," said Tamar Teneishvili, a senior official of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation in Cairo. "This request was made after information gathered from the media," Teneishvili told AFP. She said UNESCO would wait for the ministry's report to decide on its future plans. UNESCO has also asked if its own 2011 recommendations on the restoration of the pyramid had been followed. Several Egyptian NGOs have criticised the restoration work, saying the monument's original facade has been altered. Some specialists have also said that the company hired to do the restoration work, Al-Shurbagy, does not have the necessary experience. Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damati has rejected the criticism as "baseless". Last week, he told a group of journalists invited to see the ongoing restoration that the "work is underway without a problem". The executive director of the project, Michel Ghobrial Farid, has also rejected the criticism, saying the pyramid's appearance was restored the way it was at the time of its construction. The reconstruction project started in 2006 but was interrupted in February 2013 due to a lack of funding. The tomb, built by the master architect Imhotep for the Pharoah Djoser, stood 62 metres (203 feet) tall originally and is considered the oldest building in the world built entirely of stone.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/73106/UNESCO-seeks-answers-from-Egypt-on-more-than-4-600-year-old--damaged--pyramid-#.VDPx1Fes-_I[/url]Copyright%20%C2%A9%20artdaily.org[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

Fashion on Display: How Clothes Became a Top Draw at Museums

When Diana Vreeland was running what is now the Anna Wintour Costume Center at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the ’70s, she never doubted that people would line up to see clothing. “The public wants what it can’t get,” she explained. But could she have imagined the lines snaking down Fifth Avenue to see clothes by Alexander McQueen, or that similar crowds would queue up in Paris, London, Brussels, and Philadelphia to catch glimpses of handbags, shoes, and hemlines traveling up, down, and sideways? Fashion exhibitions have become fine-art institutions’ guaranteed blockbusters: Members of the public can’t get original Charles James couture (the subject of a recent show at the Met seen by half a ­million people), and they only want it more when it’s bedizened with lasers, lights, and the Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler fairy dust of such a magical institution.







Fashion attracts crowds because it is that magical combination of beautiful objects with social history. This season, one can see Chanel haute couture from the ’20s at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts (on loan from Hamish Bowles for “Hollywood Glamour: Fashion and Jewelry from the Silver Screen”) and, at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, closely examine the spangly harem pants David Bowie wore when he was in a Ziggy Stardust kind of mood. There are “Killer Heels” at the Brooklyn Museum, and “From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk,” a retrospective of the work of Jean-Paul Gaultier, has been to 11 cities and counting. The Met is hard at work on “Chinese Whispers,” which is being curated in collaboration with filmmaker Wong Kar Wai, and will open a show of elaborate, fascinating mourningwear on October 21.

But in spite of all this interest in silhouettes and beadwork, don’t expect much of a street-style scene among attendees. “Fashion’s become sort of a popular spectator sport for a lot of people,” says Valerie Steele of F.I.T., “even if not so many people are really dressing up anymore. At the Jackie Kennedy exhibit at the Met, people lined up to see it, but they were all wearing shorts and fanny packs and flip-flops, but then they were exclaiming, ‘Oh my God! Wasn’t she so stylish and beautiful?’ [It’s like] all those guys watching football while they’re drinking beer.’ ”

*This article appears in the October 6, 2014 issue of New York Magazine

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://nymag.com/thecut/2014/10/high-fashion-museum-exhibitions.html?mid=twitter_cut

Museos del Futuro y Emociones en MUSEOGRAFÍA, MUSEOLOGÍA, OPINIÓN. ·

“Lo fundamental es el principio de la diversión”.
Mikhail Baryshnikov 
 
 

 
Imagen: Jaco Haasbroek

En un imaginado escenario de futuro relacionado con los museos y los centros de interpretación del patrimonio, orientamos nuestro pensamiento hacia el objetivo de lo que podríamos denominar amenidad. Al menos nosotros queremos apuntar hacia ese objetivo, el de presentar contenidos y conceptos de una manera amena y amable, que podamos explicar el mensaje en los museos y exposiciones de una manera divertida. Y que los academicistas no se nos asusten y se tiren de los pelos, porque construir un museo divertido no es perderle el respeto ni al Arte, ni a la Historia, ni a la Ciencia, etcétera. De eso nada, al contrario, es que pretendemos acercar el conocimiento a la sociedad para que la sociedad se costumbre a acercarse al conocimiento. Puede que así de primeras suene un poco pretencioso o utópico, pero es nuestro objetivo, y cuando decimos nuestro creemos que hablamos en nombres e todos los museólogos y museógrafos de la nueva generación.

 
Archivo EVE

Los nuevos recursos interactivos, la puesta en funcionamiento de talleres para niños y adultos que sean participativos, las visitas teatralizadas, la contextualización de los contenidos, todo está encaminado para conseguir amenidad. Disponemos de análisis psicológicos del comportamiento de los visitantes, que muestran que ese concepto de amenidad lo valoran como fundamental para que los museos dejen de ser tostones insufribles y agotadores, para pasar a convertirse en una experiencia agradable y divertida.

 
Imagen: Mario Hugo

En cualquier caso, al margen de este objetivo de alcanzar la amenidad en la exposición de los contenidos de museos y exposiciones, existe otra variable que nos parece fundamental en el planteamiento museológico y museográfico del futuro: el concepto de emoción en los museos. Lo emocionante es algo que va más allá de los divertido y lo ameno, puesto que tocamos otros resortes en la psicología de los visitantes, de todos nosotros. Generar emoción no está en contradicción con el ejercicio de enseñar didácticamente, de divulgar conocimiento, función básica y fundamental que todo museo que se precie debe desempeñar. Exponer didácticamente los contenidos – objetos, arte, artefactos, especímenes, etcétera. – se puede conseguir perfectamente de forma impactante. ¡Sorpresa!

 
Archivo EVE

Generar emoción es añadir un valor en la búsqueda de efectos sobre los visitantes: iluminación, escenografía, sonido (música), aromas, efectos especiales (nosotros hemos llegado a generar lluvia y viento dentro de un museo, en una exposición sobre marinos y galernas). Los efectos multisensoriales está ahí para ser usados, con nuevos planteamientos visuales porque la tecnología está muy avanzada y está para ser utilizada en todos los ámbitos de la didáctica museográfica. Todo planteamiento es justificable si trabajamos con el referente de lo creativo profesional, y en la construcción de soluciones que no solo sirvan para acercar a nuevos visitantes a los museos, sino que ésta sea la razón por la cual la sociedad perciba los museos como lugares donde no solo aprendemos observando pasivamente el legado del saber y el conocimiento humano, sino donde también ocurre que la visita se transforme en experiencia participativa, en algo que agitará nuestras emociones.


fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti e EVE Museografía ·

Editais estimulam iniciativas de preservação e difusão do patrimônio museológico e de memória e museologia social

Editais Microprojetos e Pontos de Memória recebem inscrições

Dois extratos de editais do Instituto Brasileiro de Museus (Ibram) foram publicados nesta segunda-feira (6) no Diário Oficial da União: Modernização de Museus: Microprojetos e Pontos de Memória 2014. As inscrições para ambos ficam abertas até a meia-noite do dia 20 de novembro de 2014 e devem ser feitas via Sistema Salic Web do Ministério da Cultura.

O Prêmio Pontos de Memória vai selecionar e premiar 47 ações desenvolvidas por iniciativas de memória e museologia social, visando reconhecer, incentivar e fomentar a continuidade e sustentabilidade na perspectiva do Programa Pontos de Memória. Destas, 44 devem ser ações desenvolvidas por grupos, povos e comunidades em âmbito nacional e três ações desenvolvidas por brasileiros residentes no exterior, que se caracterizem por ações de registro e representação da sua memória.

Já a terceira edição do Prêmio Modernização de Museus – Microprojetos, voltado ao fomento e desenvolvimento de ações destinadas à preservação e difusão do patrimônio museológico, deve premiar 20 iniciativas implementadas por instituições museológicas ou mantenedores de museus, constituídos como pessoas jurídicas de direito público estadual e municipal e pessoas jurídicas de direito privado sem fins lucrativos, com finalidade cultural, excetuando-se aquelas vinculadas à estrutura do Ministério da Cultura.

Os editais já estão disponíveis para download. Dúvidas e outras questões devem ser enviadas para o endereço eletrônico fomento@museus.gov.br.


Fonte: @edisonmariotti - Instituto Brasileiro de Museus