Listen to the text.

sábado, 11 de outubro de 2014

WATCH: Liverpool artist designs bus sculptures for London street art project

Sophie Green's has contributed two sculptures to the capital's Year of the Bus Sculpture Trail

A Liverpool artist has contributed to a major street art project in London to commemorate the WWI centenary.

Sophie Green, a freelance artist and illustrator with a studio on Hanover Street, has produced two sculptures of the New Routemaster bus for the Year of the Bus, which remembers how more than a thousand London buses were sent to the Western Front during the First World War.

Up to 60 New Routemaster bus sculptures will line the streets of London for the Bus Sculpture Trail, launched by Transport for London in partnership with London Transport Museum and London's bus operators.

A third bus has also been produced by Sophie's studio partner, fellow artist Kristel Pillkahn.

Kristel Pillkahn with her Routemaster bus, Spectrum

Leon Daniels, Transport for London's Managing Director for Surface Transport, said: "I’m delighted that this sculpture trail will see the iconic London bus transformed into multiple works of art across the city."

Sophie has been involved in a number of high profile street art projects, including the 2012 Olympics Trail, Aberdeen Wild Dolphins and the National Literacy Trust Books About Town Trails.

She said: "My design for Dazzler was based on dazzle camouflage developed by artist Norman Wilkinson for use on boats during WWI, the asymmetric designs obscuring the boats shape, making them more difficult to target.

"Being a complex design much of the work was in the planning, masking large areas of the design before spray painting.

"Removing the masking tape to to reveal the design was as big a surprise to me as anyone, I’m extremely pleased with the results."

At the end of the project, each of the sculptures will be auctioned off for charity.

You can see more of Sophie's work at www.sophie-green.com


fonte: @edisonmarioti #edisonmariotti http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/whats-on/arts-culture-news/watch-liverpool-artist-designs-bus-7909768 

Archaeologists discover Bronze Age palace and huge trove of grave goods in Spain shareThis

Archaeologists from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have discovered a palatial construction with an audience hall which makes up the first specifically political precincts built in continental Europe. A prince's tomb in the subsoil contains the largest amount of grave goods from the Bronze Age existing in the Iberian Peninsula. Some of the most outstanding items include a silver diadem of great scientific and patrimonial value, the only one conserved from that era in Spain, as well as four golden and silver ear dilators.
 
 
 Bronze Age palace and huge trove of grave goods in Spain


Excavations conducted in August by the researchers of the UAB's Department of Prehistory Vicente Lull, Cristina Huete, Rafael Micó y Roberto Risch have made evident the unique archaeological wealth of La Almoloya site, located in Pliego, Murcia. The site was the cradle of the "El Argar" civilisation which lived in the south-eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula during the Bronze Age.

La Almoloya is located on a steep plateau which dominated an extensive region. This strategic and privileged position gave way to over six centuries of occupation, from 2200 to 1550 before our common era. The site was discovered in 1944 by Emeterio Cuadrado and Juan de la Cierva.

The findings indicate that La Almoloya was a primary centre of politics and wealth within the political territory of El Argar -- located a few hundred kilometres to the south in Almeria -- and sheds new light on the politics and gender relations in one of the first urban societies of the West.

A Palatial Building and new Argaric Style

The discoveries made by the archaeological team include an urban tissue made up of fully equipped buildings, as well as dozens of tombs, most of them including grave goods. According to archaeologists, this urban tissue, as well as the solidity and mastery of the construction techniques, are unique samples of prehistoric constructions in continental Europe.

The excavations indicate that the La Almoloya plateau, of 3,800 metres square, was densely populated and included several residential complexes of some 300 square metres, with eight to twelve rooms in each residence.

The buildings' walls were constructed with stones and argamasa, and covered with layers of mortar. Some parts contain stucco decorated with geometric and naturalistic motifs, a novelty which represents the discovery of an Argaric artistic style.

Among the discoveries made is a wide hall with high ceilings measuring some 70 square metres, with capacity for 64 people seated on the benches lining the walls. The hall includes a ceremonial fireplace and a podium of symbolic character. This unique building was used for political purposes and archaeologists consider that it must have been used to celebrate hearings or government meetings.

La Almoloya's Great Hall

La Almoloya's Great Hall. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Archaeologists affirm that this is the first time a building specifically dedicated to governing purposes has been discovered in Western Europe, and believe that decisions were taken here which affected many of the region's other communities.

The hall and adjoining rooms make up a large building which the archaeologists have classified as a palace. They highlight the fact that only the most important of Oriental civilisations had similar constructions during the Bronze Age, with comparable structures and functions.

Several items were recovered from the interior of the buildings, including objects made with metals, stones, bones, fabrics and ceramics; all in exceptional states of conservation.

A Princely Tomb with Objects of Great Value

Of the fifty tombs excavated from under the La Almoloya buildings, one stands out in particular. Located in a privileged area, next to the main wall of the hall, the tomb reveals the remains of a man and woman buried with their bodies in a flexed position and accompanied by some thirty objects containing precious metals and semi-precious stones.

One of the most outstanding pieces is a silver diadem which encircled the skull of the woman. The silver diadem is of great scientific and patrimonial value, since the only other four diadems known to have existed were all discovered 130 years ago at the site of El Algar in Almeria, but none of them remain today in Spain.

Silver diadem

A silver diadem discovered in the Spanish Bronze Age tomb, perched atop the head of a female skeleton. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Four ear dilators, which are unusual objects for the Bronze Age, were also discovered; two are made of solid gold and two of silver.

The abundance of silver is especially notable, since archaeologists also found nine other objects made of silver, including rings, earrings and bracelets. They also discovered that the nails used to hold the handle of an elaborate bronze dagger were made of silver.

Skull and detail of the jewels

Skull and detail of the jewels, with the golden and silver ear dilators. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

One of the most admirable items is nonetheless a small ceramic cup with the rim and outer part covered in fine layers of silver and which constitutes a pioneering example of silverwork on vessels.

The last item worth mentioning is a metallic punch with a bronze tip and a handle forged in silver. This item is considered unique and archaeologists were surprised to discover the perfection with which it was crafted and the grooved designs which decorate the top of the punch.

According to researchers, the artifacts found at La Almoloya are of great historical and patrimonial relevance. Their interest transcends local scale and should be considered of first order for all of Europe. They assure that the items are unique and that in addition to their intrinsic value, there is also the fact that they are perfectly contextualised. The archaeologists also stress the need to conserve, study and disseminate these findings.

La Almoloya contains many unknown answers and offers many promising perspectives for future digs. The completion of the urban tissue and revealing the details of the first political structure of the West are some of the challenges remaining, archaeologists conclude.

Featured image: The sprawling site of La Almoloya, near Pliego, Murcia in southeastern Spain. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona


fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/archaeologists-discover-bronze-age-palace-spain-102983

Source:

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. "Bronze age palace and grave goods discovered at the archaeological site of La Almoloya in Pliego, Murcia." ScienceDaily.
- See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/archaeologists-discover-bronze-age-palace-spain-102983#sthash.ygqZMjXr.dpuf

Archaeologists discover Bronze Age palace and huge trove of grave goods in Spain

shareThis
Archaeologists from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have discovered a palatial construction with an audience hall which makes up the first specifically political precincts built in continental Europe. A prince's tomb in the subsoil contains the largest amount of grave goods from the Bronze Age existing in the Iberian Peninsula. Some of the most outstanding items include a silver diadem of great scientific and patrimonial value, the only one conserved from that era in Spain, as well as four golden and silver ear dilators.
Excavations conducted in August by the researchers of the UAB's Department of Prehistory Vicente Lull, Cristina Huete, Rafael Micó y Roberto Risch have made evident the unique archaeological wealth of La Almoloya site, located in Pliego, Murcia. The site was the cradle of the "El Argar" civilisation which lived in the south-eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula during the Bronze Age.
La Almoloya is located on a steep plateau which dominated an extensive region. This strategic and privileged position gave way to over six centuries of occupation, from 2200 to 1550 before our common era. The site was discovered in 1944 by Emeterio Cuadrado and Juan de la Cierva.
The findings indicate that La Almoloya was a primary centre of politics and wealth within the political territory of El Argar -- located a few hundred kilometres to the south in Almeria -- and sheds new light on the politics and gender relations in one of the first urban societies of the West.
A Palatial Building and new Argaric Style
The discoveries made by the archaeological team include an urban tissue made up of fully equipped buildings, as well as dozens of tombs, most of them including grave goods. According to archaeologists, this urban tissue, as well as the solidity and mastery of the construction techniques, are unique samples of prehistoric constructions in continental Europe.
The excavations indicate that the La Almoloya plateau, of 3,800 metres square, was densely populated and included several residential complexes of some 300 square metres, with eight to twelve rooms in each residence.
The buildings' walls were constructed with stones and argamasa, and covered with layers of mortar. Some parts contain stucco decorated with geometric and naturalistic motifs, a novelty which represents the discovery of an Argaric artistic style.
Among the discoveries made is a wide hall with high ceilings measuring some 70 square metres, with capacity for 64 people seated on the benches lining the walls. The hall includes a ceremonial fireplace and a podium of symbolic character. This unique building was used for political purposes and archaeologists consider that it must have been used to celebrate hearings or government meetings.
La Almoloya's Great Hall
La Almoloya's Great Hall. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Archaeologists affirm that this is the first time a building specifically dedicated to governing purposes has been discovered in Western Europe, and believe that decisions were taken here which affected many of the region's other communities.
The hall and adjoining rooms make up a large building which the archaeologists have classified as a palace. They highlight the fact that only the most important of Oriental civilisations had similar constructions during the Bronze Age, with comparable structures and functions.
Several items were recovered from the interior of the buildings, including objects made with metals, stones, bones, fabrics and ceramics; all in exceptional states of conservation.
A Princely Tomb with Objects of Great Value
Of the fifty tombs excavated from under the La Almoloya buildings, one stands out in particular. Located in a privileged area, next to the main wall of the hall, the tomb reveals the remains of a man and woman buried with their bodies in a flexed position and accompanied by some thirty objects containing precious metals and semi-precious stones.
One of the most outstanding pieces is a silver diadem which encircled the skull of the woman. The silver diadem is of great scientific and patrimonial value, since the only other four diadems known to have existed were all discovered 130 years ago at the site of El Algar in Almeria, but none of them remain today in Spain.
Silver diadem
A silver diadem discovered in the Spanish Bronze Age tomb, perched atop the head of a female skeleton. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Four ear dilators, which are unusual objects for the Bronze Age, were also discovered; two are made of solid gold and two of silver.
The abundance of silver is especially notable, since archaeologists also found nine other objects made of silver, including rings, earrings and bracelets. They also discovered that the nails used to hold the handle of an elaborate bronze dagger were made of silver.
Skull and detail of the jewels
Skull and detail of the jewels, with the golden and silver ear dilators. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
One of the most admirable items is nonetheless a small ceramic cup with the rim and outer part covered in fine layers of silver and which constitutes a pioneering example of silverwork on vessels.
The last item worth mentioning is a metallic punch with a bronze tip and a handle forged in silver. This item is considered unique and archaeologists were surprised to discover the perfection with which it was crafted and the grooved designs which decorate the top of the punch.
According to researchers, the artifacts found at La Almoloya are of great historical and patrimonial relevance. Their interest transcends local scale and should be considered of first order for all of Europe. They assure that the items are unique and that in addition to their intrinsic value, there is also the fact that they are perfectly contextualised. The archaeologists also stress the need to conserve, study and disseminate these findings.
La Almoloya contains many unknown answers and offers many promising perspectives for future digs. The completion of the urban tissue and revealing the details of the first political structure of the West are some of the challenges remaining, archaeologists conclude.
Featured image: The sprawling site of La Almoloya, near Pliego, Murcia in southeastern Spain. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Source:
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. "Bronze age palace and grave goods discovered at the archaeological site of La Almoloya in Pliego, Murcia." ScienceDaily.
- See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/archaeologists-discover-bronze-age-palace-spain-102983#sthash.ygqZMjXr.dpuf

Archaeologists discover Bronze Age palace and huge trove of grave goods in Spain

shareThis
Archaeologists from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have discovered a palatial construction with an audience hall which makes up the first specifically political precincts built in continental Europe. A prince's tomb in the subsoil contains the largest amount of grave goods from the Bronze Age existing in the Iberian Peninsula. Some of the most outstanding items include a silver diadem of great scientific and patrimonial value, the only one conserved from that era in Spain, as well as four golden and silver ear dilators.
Excavations conducted in August by the researchers of the UAB's Department of Prehistory Vicente Lull, Cristina Huete, Rafael Micó y Roberto Risch have made evident the unique archaeological wealth of La Almoloya site, located in Pliego, Murcia. The site was the cradle of the "El Argar" civilisation which lived in the south-eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula during the Bronze Age.
La Almoloya is located on a steep plateau which dominated an extensive region. This strategic and privileged position gave way to over six centuries of occupation, from 2200 to 1550 before our common era. The site was discovered in 1944 by Emeterio Cuadrado and Juan de la Cierva.
The findings indicate that La Almoloya was a primary centre of politics and wealth within the political territory of El Argar -- located a few hundred kilometres to the south in Almeria -- and sheds new light on the politics and gender relations in one of the first urban societies of the West.
A Palatial Building and new Argaric Style
The discoveries made by the archaeological team include an urban tissue made up of fully equipped buildings, as well as dozens of tombs, most of them including grave goods. According to archaeologists, this urban tissue, as well as the solidity and mastery of the construction techniques, are unique samples of prehistoric constructions in continental Europe.
The excavations indicate that the La Almoloya plateau, of 3,800 metres square, was densely populated and included several residential complexes of some 300 square metres, with eight to twelve rooms in each residence.
The buildings' walls were constructed with stones and argamasa, and covered with layers of mortar. Some parts contain stucco decorated with geometric and naturalistic motifs, a novelty which represents the discovery of an Argaric artistic style.
Among the discoveries made is a wide hall with high ceilings measuring some 70 square metres, with capacity for 64 people seated on the benches lining the walls. The hall includes a ceremonial fireplace and a podium of symbolic character. This unique building was used for political purposes and archaeologists consider that it must have been used to celebrate hearings or government meetings.
La Almoloya's Great Hall
La Almoloya's Great Hall. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Archaeologists affirm that this is the first time a building specifically dedicated to governing purposes has been discovered in Western Europe, and believe that decisions were taken here which affected many of the region's other communities.
The hall and adjoining rooms make up a large building which the archaeologists have classified as a palace. They highlight the fact that only the most important of Oriental civilisations had similar constructions during the Bronze Age, with comparable structures and functions.
Several items were recovered from the interior of the buildings, including objects made with metals, stones, bones, fabrics and ceramics; all in exceptional states of conservation.
A Princely Tomb with Objects of Great Value
Of the fifty tombs excavated from under the La Almoloya buildings, one stands out in particular. Located in a privileged area, next to the main wall of the hall, the tomb reveals the remains of a man and woman buried with their bodies in a flexed position and accompanied by some thirty objects containing precious metals and semi-precious stones.
One of the most outstanding pieces is a silver diadem which encircled the skull of the woman. The silver diadem is of great scientific and patrimonial value, since the only other four diadems known to have existed were all discovered 130 years ago at the site of El Algar in Almeria, but none of them remain today in Spain.
Silver diadem
A silver diadem discovered in the Spanish Bronze Age tomb, perched atop the head of a female skeleton. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Four ear dilators, which are unusual objects for the Bronze Age, were also discovered; two are made of solid gold and two of silver.
The abundance of silver is especially notable, since archaeologists also found nine other objects made of silver, including rings, earrings and bracelets. They also discovered that the nails used to hold the handle of an elaborate bronze dagger were made of silver.
Skull and detail of the jewels
Skull and detail of the jewels, with the golden and silver ear dilators. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
One of the most admirable items is nonetheless a small ceramic cup with the rim and outer part covered in fine layers of silver and which constitutes a pioneering example of silverwork on vessels.
The last item worth mentioning is a metallic punch with a bronze tip and a handle forged in silver. This item is considered unique and archaeologists were surprised to discover the perfection with which it was crafted and the grooved designs which decorate the top of the punch.
According to researchers, the artifacts found at La Almoloya are of great historical and patrimonial relevance. Their interest transcends local scale and should be considered of first order for all of Europe. They assure that the items are unique and that in addition to their intrinsic value, there is also the fact that they are perfectly contextualised. The archaeologists also stress the need to conserve, study and disseminate these findings.
La Almoloya contains many unknown answers and offers many promising perspectives for future digs. The completion of the urban tissue and revealing the details of the first political structure of the West are some of the challenges remaining, archaeologists conclude.
Featured image: The sprawling site of La Almoloya, near Pliego, Murcia in southeastern Spain. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Source:
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. "Bronze age palace and grave goods discovered at the archaeological site of La Almoloya in Pliego, Murcia." ScienceDaily.
- See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/archaeologists-discover-bronze-age-palace-spain-102983#sthash.ygqZMjXr.dpuf

Archaeologists discover Bronze Age palace and huge trove of grave goods in Spain

shareThis
Archaeologists from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have discovered a palatial construction with an audience hall which makes up the first specifically political precincts built in continental Europe. A prince's tomb in the subsoil contains the largest amount of grave goods from the Bronze Age existing in the Iberian Peninsula. Some of the most outstanding items include a silver diadem of great scientific and patrimonial value, the only one conserved from that era in Spain, as well as four golden and silver ear dilators.
Excavations conducted in August by the researchers of the UAB's Department of Prehistory Vicente Lull, Cristina Huete, Rafael Micó y Roberto Risch have made evident the unique archaeological wealth of La Almoloya site, located in Pliego, Murcia. The site was the cradle of the "El Argar" civilisation which lived in the south-eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula during the Bronze Age.
La Almoloya is located on a steep plateau which dominated an extensive region. This strategic and privileged position gave way to over six centuries of occupation, from 2200 to 1550 before our common era. The site was discovered in 1944 by Emeterio Cuadrado and Juan de la Cierva.
The findings indicate that La Almoloya was a primary centre of politics and wealth within the political territory of El Argar -- located a few hundred kilometres to the south in Almeria -- and sheds new light on the politics and gender relations in one of the first urban societies of the West.
A Palatial Building and new Argaric Style
The discoveries made by the archaeological team include an urban tissue made up of fully equipped buildings, as well as dozens of tombs, most of them including grave goods. According to archaeologists, this urban tissue, as well as the solidity and mastery of the construction techniques, are unique samples of prehistoric constructions in continental Europe.
The excavations indicate that the La Almoloya plateau, of 3,800 metres square, was densely populated and included several residential complexes of some 300 square metres, with eight to twelve rooms in each residence.
The buildings' walls were constructed with stones and argamasa, and covered with layers of mortar. Some parts contain stucco decorated with geometric and naturalistic motifs, a novelty which represents the discovery of an Argaric artistic style.
Among the discoveries made is a wide hall with high ceilings measuring some 70 square metres, with capacity for 64 people seated on the benches lining the walls. The hall includes a ceremonial fireplace and a podium of symbolic character. This unique building was used for political purposes and archaeologists consider that it must have been used to celebrate hearings or government meetings.
La Almoloya's Great Hall
La Almoloya's Great Hall. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Archaeologists affirm that this is the first time a building specifically dedicated to governing purposes has been discovered in Western Europe, and believe that decisions were taken here which affected many of the region's other communities.
The hall and adjoining rooms make up a large building which the archaeologists have classified as a palace. They highlight the fact that only the most important of Oriental civilisations had similar constructions during the Bronze Age, with comparable structures and functions.
Several items were recovered from the interior of the buildings, including objects made with metals, stones, bones, fabrics and ceramics; all in exceptional states of conservation.
A Princely Tomb with Objects of Great Value
Of the fifty tombs excavated from under the La Almoloya buildings, one stands out in particular. Located in a privileged area, next to the main wall of the hall, the tomb reveals the remains of a man and woman buried with their bodies in a flexed position and accompanied by some thirty objects containing precious metals and semi-precious stones.
One of the most outstanding pieces is a silver diadem which encircled the skull of the woman. The silver diadem is of great scientific and patrimonial value, since the only other four diadems known to have existed were all discovered 130 years ago at the site of El Algar in Almeria, but none of them remain today in Spain.
Silver diadem
A silver diadem discovered in the Spanish Bronze Age tomb, perched atop the head of a female skeleton. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Four ear dilators, which are unusual objects for the Bronze Age, were also discovered; two are made of solid gold and two of silver.
The abundance of silver is especially notable, since archaeologists also found nine other objects made of silver, including rings, earrings and bracelets. They also discovered that the nails used to hold the handle of an elaborate bronze dagger were made of silver.
Skull and detail of the jewels
Skull and detail of the jewels, with the golden and silver ear dilators. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
One of the most admirable items is nonetheless a small ceramic cup with the rim and outer part covered in fine layers of silver and which constitutes a pioneering example of silverwork on vessels.
The last item worth mentioning is a metallic punch with a bronze tip and a handle forged in silver. This item is considered unique and archaeologists were surprised to discover the perfection with which it was crafted and the grooved designs which decorate the top of the punch.
According to researchers, the artifacts found at La Almoloya are of great historical and patrimonial relevance. Their interest transcends local scale and should be considered of first order for all of Europe. They assure that the items are unique and that in addition to their intrinsic value, there is also the fact that they are perfectly contextualised. The archaeologists also stress the need to conserve, study and disseminate these findings.
La Almoloya contains many unknown answers and offers many promising perspectives for future digs. The completion of the urban tissue and revealing the details of the first political structure of the West are some of the challenges remaining, archaeologists conclude.
Featured image: The sprawling site of La Almoloya, near Pliego, Murcia in southeastern Spain. Credit: Image courtesy of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Source:
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. "Bronze age palace and grave goods discovered at the archaeological site of La Almoloya in Pliego, Murcia." ScienceDaily.
- See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/archaeologists-discover-bronze-age-palace-spain-102983#sthash.ygqZMjXr.dpuf

Estudantes brasileiros poderão estagiar em museus de Londres


Oportunidade
Candidatos devem se inscrever para as vagas por meio do British Council e no Edital Conexão Cultura Brasil #Intercâmbios


A Secretaria da Economia Criativa do Ministério da Cultura, em parceria com o British Council, obteve duas (2) vagas em estágios em museus de Londres. As oportunidades serão no Science Museum Group e no Horniman Museum and Gardens.

Os candidatos devem se inscrever para as vagas por meio do British Council e simultaneamente no Edital Conexão Cultura Brasil #Intercâmbios para obtenção de ajuda de custo para a cobertura de gastos de viagem. As inscrições para viagens em janeiro, fevereiro e março devem ser feitas até o dia 7 de novembro. Confira a seguir mais detalhes sobre essas oportunidades.

Para mais informações, acesse o site do Ministério da Cultura.

Estágio no Science Museum Group

O Science Museum Group é um dos museus dedicado à ciência mais importantes do mundo. É um organismo público do Reino Unido do qual também fazem parte o Museu Nacional Ferroviário (nas cidades de York e Shildon), o Museu Nacional de Comunicação Social (em Bradford) e o Museu de Ciência e Indústria (Manchester).

O estágio é uma oportunidade única para fazer parte de uma equipe que entrega um programa inovador baseado em ciência contemporânea, tecnologia e medicina, com foco no desenvolvimento de conteúdo, exposição, desenvolvimento de eventos e relações interpessoais.

Os candidatos devem ter inglês intermediário, e o estágio tem duração de 12 semanas, a partir de janeiro de 2015.

Estágio Profissional no Horniman Museum and Gardens

Inaugurado em 1901, o Museu Horniman tem uma coleção de 350 mil objetos de todo o mundo, e suas galerias incluem história natural, antropologia, música e um aclamado aquário.

A oportunidade de estágio profissional possibilitará ao estudante trabalhar com equipe de aprendizagem e voluntariado do museu. Dentre as atividades previstas, aprenderá a manusear as coleções e a receber os visitantes, além de trabalhar na área de pesquisa e desenvolvimento de atividades e programas familiares. Os candidatos devem ter inglês intermediário, e o estágio tem duração de 10 semanas, a partir de fevereiro de 2015.

Fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.brasil.gov.br/cultura/2014/10/estudantes-brasileiros-poderao-estagiar-em-museus-de-londres Ministério da Cultura
 

Au Musée Jacquemart-André, Le Pérugin ou la manière douce

Fêté en son temps comme l’un des meilleurs, le peintre ombrien a les honneurs du Musée Jacquemart-André, à Paris, qui rapproche son œuvre de celle du divin Raphaël.




(C LANCIEN/C. LOISEL/MUSEES DE LA VILLE DE ROUEN)
« La Résurrection », Le Perugin, Rouen, Musée des Beaux-Arts.





En plein centre de Perugia, capitale de l’Ombrie, le peintre a donné son nom à un magnifique « corso » où il fait bon flâner quand le soir tombe. La ville rend légitimement hommage à Pietro Vanucci (dit Le Pérugin, vers 1450-1523), lui qui répandit sur ses toiles les lumières blondes, les brumes matinales frangées d’argent et les courbes sinueuses des paysages ombriens. Lui qui noyait les lignes de fuite de ses tableaux dans les eaux limpides du lac Trasimène, bordé d’arbres verdoyants et de tendres prairies.
Le « maître de Raphaël »

Le Musée Jacquemart-André lui consacre une séduisante exposition, tout en précisant au visiteur qu’il fut le « maître de Raphaël ». Il est vrai qu’aux yeux de la postérité (et du marketing culturel…), le divin artiste d’Urbino (1483-1520) brille plus haut que celui auquel il doit pourtant beaucoup, mais que le grand public connaît moins. Les historiens d’art ne sont pas unanimes quant à la fréquentation effective par le cadet de l’atelier de son aîné.

Il n’empêche : le style de Raphaël, la composition de ses scènes intimes (Madones à l’enfant ou saints accueillant le martyre avec sérénité) ou plus lyriques, s’inscrivent dans la lignée et la haute technicité du Pérugin. Jusqu’aux vêtements de la Vierge (robe rouge gansée de noir et manteau bleu) qui semblent empruntés au même vestiaire. Si bien que l’on hésite encore aujourd’hui à attribuer tel ou tel panneau à l’un plutôt qu’à l’autre : qui est l’auteur de la prédelle du retable de Fano où figurent, vivantes saynètes, les épisodes de la vie de Marie ? « Une énigme sans solution », souligne Alessandro Marchi dans le catalogue de l’exposition.
Un talent reconnu en son temps

Influencé par Piero della Francesca et élève de Verrocchio à Florence dont il partage l’enseignement avec Léonard de Vinci et Botticelli, Le Pérugin tend une passerelle entre le quattrocento et les premiers feux, rayonnants, du XVIe siècle. Des petits tableaux de piété jusqu’aux grands chantiers artistiques de la chrétienté, telle la chapelle Sixtine où il est appelé par le pape Sixte IV au début des années 1480, son art épanoui, à la fois suave et brillant, attire à lui célébrité et commandes.

Sa renommée franchit les frontières italiennes et l’on peut lire en 1504, sous la plume du poète français Jean Lemaire de Belges, ces quelques mots : « Perusin, qui si bien couleurs mesle ». Son éblouissante palette chromatique mérite amplement l’éloge, depuis des verts audacieux côtoyant d’ardents orangers, jusqu’à ces mauves, roses ou gris tourterelle qui s’enroulent autour des formes gracieuses d’anges aux prunelles ambrées.
Deux œuvres exceptionnelles

Parmi les œuvres venues de musées italiens, français, britanniques ou américains, se glissent deux tableaux prêtés par des particuliers : à eux seuls, ils justifient la visite. Voici un diptyque aux tons sombres et sobres : la Vierge et le Christ y partagent une même expression mélancolique, un même regard qui traverse le spectateur pour se perdre au loin.

Et voilà une étonnante Annonciation dont la composition géométrique presque froide (architecture envahissante, clarté dorée irréelle qui réduit les ombres à quelques traces) est contredite par l’attitude de la jeune fille qui a fait tomber son livre de surprise. Et se détourne presque de l’Ange qui vient bouleverser sa vie…
fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.la-croix.com/Culture/Expositions/Au-Musee-Jacquemart-Andre-Le-Perugin-ou-la-maniere-douce-2014-10-10-1247228


Jusqu’au 19 janvier. Rens. : 01.45.62.11.59. et www.musee-jacquemart-andre.com
10/10/14 - 17 H 00

Premier musée de la presse du monde francophone à l'ESJ Lille

Lille, 10 oct 2014 (AFP) - La France et la francophonie disposent désormais de leur premier musée de la presse, installé à l'Ecole supérieure de journalisme (ESJ) de Lille à l'occasion de son 90e anniversaire, et qui devait être accessible dès vendredi soir sur un site internet déjà riche.

"Moments de presse", comme est intitulé cet ensemble d'objets symboliques, de faits saillants voire héroïques et de unes historiques relatifs aux médias de 1631 à 2014, est physiquement logé dans une salle de l'ESJ, sous l'égide du réseau Théophraste des écoles de journalisme francophones.

La collection et ses prolongements ont été d'emblée également conçus comme "le musée sans murs d'un métier sans frontières", au travers de son site internet www.momentspresse.org, a expliqué à l'AFP son conservateur français, Bertrand Labasse, qui enseigne à l'université d'Ottawa.

Parmi les livres sur le journalisme qui pourront y être consultés ou téléchargés gratuitement, ceux de Jules Verne, d'Emile Zola ou de Voltaire.

La naissance du musée est marquée par une exposition que devait inaugurer vendredi en fin de journée à la mairie de Lille la ministre de la CultureFleur Pellerin venue assister à la leçon inaugurale de la 90e promotion de l'ESJ de Lille. Celle-ci devait être donnée par Anne Sinclair, directrice du Huffington Post, devant des centaines d'invités dans le grand hall de la mairie.

Le visiteur découvrira entre autres dans cette exposition le premier zoom de caméra au monde, fabriqué par une entreprise française méconnue, mais aussi le havresac d'un correspondant de guerre de l'agence de presse américaine UPI ou encore une de ces petites machines à écrire Remington au clavier insonorisé utilisée par la presse d'outre-Atlantique.

D'autres grandes aires linguistiques bénéficiaient depuis longtemps de musées de ce type, tels le Newseum de Washington, le Zeitungsmuseum d'Aix-la-Chapelle, ou encore le Newspark de Yokohama (Japon).

Le noyau de la collection "Moments de presse" est français, car il hérite des objets rassemblés à l'origine par le défunt centre technique de la presse française installé à Lyon sous les auspices de la Fédération nationale de la presse (FNPF) qui a disparu en 2009.

Mais ce musée est désormais aussi celui des pays ayant le français en partage, avec le soutien de l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie (OIF).

Pour autant, a souligné M. Labasse, "ce n'est pas un musée de la presse francophone mais bien un musée francophone de la presse mondiale".

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://tempsreel.nouvelobs.com/education/20141010.AFP7987/premier-musee-de-la-presse-du-monde-francophone-a-l-esj-lille.html