terça-feira, 28 de outubro de 2014

MX_SI's addition to the Serlachius Museum Gösta has a stripy facade based on an "abstract forest"



Spanish studio MX_SI added vertical wooden mullions to the exterior of this museum extension in Mänttä, Finland, to evoke the trunks of trees in the surrounding park (+ slideshow).












MX_SI won a competition in 2011 to design a new wing for the Contemporary Art Museum Gösta Serlachius with a proposal for a building with a timber frame and wooden cladding, intended to blend in with its setting in a forested park.




Related story: Controversial Helsinki Guggenheim competition attracts record number of entrants

Situated next to the Joennimei Manor, a residence constructed in 1935 that previously housed the museum, the extension provides additional space for the expanding collection and for temporary exhibitions.



The building's long and narrow plan is arranged parallel to the axis between the existing house, its garden and a nearby lake. This frames a new plaza at one end, providing access to the house and the extension.



A curving roofline dips down so as not to obstruct views to and from the manor, but sweeps upwards to form a more prominent facade at one end, where the landscape descends towards the lake.



Locally sourced spruce was laminated to create a structural framework that is surrounded by vertical mullions, with strips of twisted spruce placed in between them. This provides a textural surface that varies over the length of the facades.



"The project is conceptualised as an abstract and dense forest," said the architects in a statement, "a forest that represents and translates into a series of parallel wooden frames that define the geometry and structure of the new building."



Various openings and angular incisions interrupt the elongated elevations, featuring reflective glazing to break up the otherwise homogenous wooden facades and increase the connection with the surrounding landscape.



"To reduce the visual impact of a building in such a sensitive environment, the building seeks to decompose into smaller fragments," said the architects.

"The result of these incisions is the perception of spaces of infinite mirrors – doors or forest walkways optically subdividing the building transversely."



The incisions into the facades introduce variety to the route through the building, allowing natural light to enter and offering views from the galleries, foyer and cafeteria.

"These invasions transform what would have been a linear path into an emotional one, thanks to the rhythm of the constant repetition of the structural frames and interruptions that allow external spaces to penetrate inside the building," added the architects. Photograph by Tuomas Uusheimo

Ceiling beams have been left exposed inside the galleries and public spaces to emphasise the curving form of the roof and to highlight the use of wood throughout the entire project. Photograph by Eugeni Bach

MX_SI was also responsible for improvements to the landscape around the buildings, which provides a site for outdoor artworks including sculptures by Finnish artist Harry Kivijärvi.

Part of the task involved the introduction of a bridge linking the park with a small island on the site of a crossing that had collapsed decades previously. Photograph by Eugeni Bach

The new structure connects the gently sloping shore of the park with a higher bank on the island and is therefore angled slightly.

The lower end emerges from the ground before ascending to a narrower point that appears to balance on the island's rocky shore.



The bridge is made from weathered steel sheeting. This material was bent in four places to create a structural section that supports a balustrade on one side and a larch wood surface on the other, which alters along its length to form a bench in the centre.

Photography is by Pedro Pegenaute unless stated otherwise. Concept diagram – click for larger imageLower floor plan – click for larger imageUpper floor plan – click for larger imageSections – click for larger imageBridge section – click for larger image
Related story: Kaap Skil Maritime and Beachcombers Museum by Mecanoo

This maritime museum in the Netherlands by Dutch studio Mecanoo features reclaimed wooden cladding and a zig-zagging roof that reference the gabled houses of the surrounding hamlet (+ slideshow). More »

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.dezeen.com/2014/10/27/mx_si-contemporary-art-museum-gosta-serlachius-extension-finland-wooden-facade/

High Museum of Art presents rarely exhibited masterpieces by Cézanne, van Gogh, Degas and Modigliani

ATLANTA, GA.- The High Museum of Art presents “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” a major traveling exhibition organized by the Princeton University Art Museum featuring 50 modern masterworks, many of which are rarely exhibited. 

Paul Cézanne, Provençal Manor, ca. 1885. Oil on canvas, 13 x 19 in. The Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation, on long-term loan to the Princeton University Art Museum.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/73800/High-Museum-of-Art-presents-rarely-exhibited-masterpieces-by-C-zanne--van-Gogh--Degas-and-Modigliani#.VFAJJWfhW1s[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
 
Paul Cézanne, Provençal Manor, ca. 1885. Oil on canvas, 13 x 19 in. The Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation, on long-term loan to the Princeton University Art Museum.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/73800/High-Museum-of-Art-presents-rarely-exhibited-masterpieces-by-C-zanne--van-Gogh--Degas-and-Modigliani#.VFAJJWfhW1s[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
 
On view Oct. 25, 2014, through Jan. 11, 2015, the exhibition will offer visitors the chance to view exceptional masterpieces by Cézanne, van Gogh, Manet, Modigliani, Degas, Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec and others. Featured works showcase the extraordinary vision of Henry Pearlman (1895-1974), a modest American entrepreneur who amassed an astonishing collection of modern art from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including perhaps the greatest collection of watercolors by Cézanne outside of France. 
 
Since 1976, the Henry and Rose Pearlman Collection has resided at the Princeton University Art Museum, and this exhibition marks the first international tour of the entire collection since Pearlman’s death in 1974. “Cézanne and the Modern” features 24 works by Cézanne, including an exceptional set of 16 watercolors. The exhibition also features 26 paintings and sculptures by Degas, Manet, Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustave Courbet, Honoré Daumier, Oskar Kokoschka, Wilhelm Lembruck, Jacques Lipchitz, Camille Pissarro and Alfred Sisley. Highlights include Cézanne’s “Mont Sainte-Victoire” (ca. 1904–06), van Gogh’s “Tarascon Stagecoach” (1888), and Modigliani’s portrait of Jean Cocteau (1916). 
 
The exhibition also includes seven works by Chaïm Soutine, and in conjunction with “Cézanne and the Modern,” the High will present five portraits by the Expressionist painter, generously on loan from the Lewis Collection. “The High is honored to present these remarkable collections featuring works by many of the most famous artists of the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movements,” said Michael E. Shapiro, Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr. director of the High. 
 
”The opportunity to share these treasured, historic works with our visitors is a true joy.” Over three decades, Pearlman assembled one of the finest collections of European art remaining in private hands. A lifelong New Yorker, Pearlman founded the Eastern Cold Storage Company in 1919, which made important contributions to marine shipbuilding during World War II. He began seriously collecting avant-garde art in the 1940s with the purchase of a canvas by Soutine, an artist known for his bold use of color and expressive brushwork. Pearlman quickly became interested in Modigliani, another artist of the so-called School of Paris, and eventually began to collect works by some of the artists who influenced them, including Manet, Toulouse-Lautrec, van Gogh, Gauguin and Cézanne. 
 
By building close relationships with a number of dealers in the U.S. and abroad, and befriending artists directly, Pearlman secured numerous paintings that today are deemed masterpieces. He relished the hunt for secreted masterworks and was fascinated by the networks of aesthetic influence and personal relationships among artists. “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection” is organized by the Princeton University Art Museum in cooperation with the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation. 
 
The exhibition premiered at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Oxford, Oxford, England (March 13–June 22, 2014), then traveled to the Musée Granet, Aix-en-Provence, France (July 11–Oct. 5, 2014) before the High Museum of Art (Oct. 25, 2014–Jan. 11, 2015). Following its presentation at the High, the exhibition will be on view at Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, Canada (Feb. 7–May 18, 2015), and the tour will culminate at Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, N.J. (Sept. 12, 2015–Jan. 3, 2016). The exhibition is co-curated by the Princeton University Art Museum’s Betsy Rosasco, research curator of European painting and sculpture, and Laura Giles, Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970, curator of prints and drawings.

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti: http://artdaily.com/news/73800/High-Museum-of-Art-presents-rarely-exhibited-masterpieces-by-C-zanne--van-Gogh--Degas-and-Modigliani#.VFAJJWfhW1s[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org







ATLANTA, GA.- The High Museum of Art presents “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” a major traveling exhibition organized by the Princeton University Art Museum featuring 50 modern masterworks, many of which are rarely exhibited. On view Oct. 25, 2014, through Jan. 11, 2015, the exhibition will offer visitors the chance to view exceptional masterpieces by Cézanne, van Gogh, Manet, Modigliani, Degas, Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec and others. Featured works showcase the extraordinary vision of Henry Pearlman (1895-1974), a modest American entrepreneur who amassed an astonishing collection of modern art from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including perhaps the greatest collection of watercolors by Cézanne outside of France. Since 1976, the Henry and Rose Pearlman Collection has resided at the Princeton University Art Museum, and this exhibition marks the first international tour of the entire collection since Pearlman’s death in 1974. “Cézanne and the Modern” features 24 works by Cézanne, including an exceptional set of 16 watercolors. The exhibition also features 26 paintings and sculptures by Degas, Manet, Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustave Courbet, Honoré Daumier, Oskar Kokoschka, Wilhelm Lembruck, Jacques Lipchitz, Camille Pissarro and Alfred Sisley. Highlights include Cézanne’s “Mont Sainte-Victoire” (ca. 1904–06), van Gogh’s “Tarascon Stagecoach” (1888), and Modigliani’s portrait of Jean Cocteau (1916). The exhibition also includes seven works by Chaïm Soutine, and in conjunction with “Cézanne and the Modern,” the High will present five portraits by the Expressionist painter, generously on loan from the Lewis Collection. “The High is honored to present these remarkable collections featuring works by many of the most famous artists of the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movements,” said Michael E. Shapiro, Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr. director of the High. ”The opportunity to share these treasured, historic works with our visitors is a true joy.” Over three decades, Pearlman assembled one of the finest collections of European art remaining in private hands. A lifelong New Yorker, Pearlman founded the Eastern Cold Storage Company in 1919, which made important contributions to marine shipbuilding during World War II. He began seriously collecting avant-garde art in the 1940s with the purchase of a canvas by Soutine, an artist known for his bold use of color and expressive brushwork. Pearlman quickly became interested in Modigliani, another artist of the so-called School of Paris, and eventually began to collect works by some of the artists who influenced them, including Manet, Toulouse-Lautrec, van Gogh, Gauguin and Cézanne. By building close relationships with a number of dealers in the U.S. and abroad, and befriending artists directly, Pearlman secured numerous paintings that today are deemed masterpieces. He relished the hunt for secreted masterworks and was fascinated by the networks of aesthetic influence and personal relationships among artists. “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection” is organized by the Princeton University Art Museum in cooperation with the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation. The exhibition premiered at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Oxford, Oxford, England (March 13–June 22, 2014), then traveled to the Musée Granet, Aix-en-Provence, France (July 11–Oct. 5, 2014) before the High Museum of Art (Oct. 25, 2014–Jan. 11, 2015). Following its presentation at the High, the exhibition will be on view at Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, Canada (Feb. 7–May 18, 2015), and the tour will culminate at Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, N.J. (Sept. 12, 2015–Jan. 3, 2016). The exhibition is co-curated by the Princeton University Art Museum’s Betsy Rosasco, research curator of European painting and sculpture, and Laura Giles, Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970, curator of prints and drawings.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/73800/High-Museum-of-Art-presents-rarely-exhibited-masterpieces-by-C-zanne--van-Gogh--Degas-and-Modigliani#.VFAJJWfhW1s[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

Sistine Chapel being used as sacred place – not 'venue for private parties'



Director of the Vatican Museums Antonio Paolucci has rejected rumors that they are now renting the Sistine Chapel, adding that beauty is always an occasion to grow in charity and generosity.
 
 


“In the last few days I've read that someone thought we are renting the Sistine Chapel to those who have money to spend,” Paolucci said in an Oct. 20 statement released by the Vatican Museums.

“It is nothing of the sort, because the Sistine Chapel is a sacred place: it's certainly not able to be rented on request, nor will it ever become a venue for private parties!”

Rumors surrounding the Sistine Chapel began following the Oct. 18 launch of the museum’s “The Art of Charity” initiative, which consists of a series of exclusive events that include a guided tour of the museums with a private concert inside the Sistine Chapel, as well as a dinner inside the museums.

The Rome-based Orchestra of the Academy of Santa Cecilia, was the group selected to play during the launch event. They performed Rossini’s “Petite Messe Solennelle.”

The Porsche Travel Club was the first to take advantage of the new project, with members paying up to $6,000 per person for the concert-tour combo, which would yield a ballpark total of $200,000, a Vatican source confirmed. Up to 70 people are expected to participate in such events.

In his statement, Paolucci lamented the confusion that has arisen out of the event, explaining that the Vatican Museums have always accepted groups for private tours after hours, during which a visit to the Sistine Chapel is customary.

This, he said, is “a natural part of the Museum tour, so this is not 'news;’ we are not doing anything that different, (only adding) an additional pretense which is the novelty of the project.”

Paolucci noted that as the museums belonging to the Vatican, they seek to channel the energy and resources they receive from these events in the name of “the beauty of the arts” toward the always-present and ever-increasing needs of the poor.

“The insight that we give is simple: art is charity and love. It gives so much to man, it recalls the sense of his existence, without asking anything in return other than a glance and an open heart.”

For those who still maintain the “contemptuous audacity” to ask the Pope why he doesn’t sell his art if he is so interested in the poor, the museum director said that the museum’s response is simple: “because man would be poorer in every sense” for it.

When art and the generosity of businesses and individuals come together so much more can be done, he said, and expressed his hope that the Oct. 18 launch of “The Art of Charity” will only be the first of many other such events that “many others” will support in the future.

In the statement, the museums also emphasized the “daily actions of solidarity” practiced by the Church throughout the world, which are executed “silently but effectively, without clamor, without making any noise, and for which there is always a need for new resources.”

“It is, therefore, a unique opportunity aimed at those who want to embrace initiatives of high cultural and social value,” the statement closed.

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.ewtnnews.com/catholic-news/Vatican.php?id=11014

7 Formas de Reconocer un Museo Moderno · en CULTURA, MUSEOGRAFÍA, MUSEOLOGÍA, OPINIÓN.


“El futuro depende de
lo que hagamos hoy“. 
 Mahatma Gandhi



“The Museum” de Joanne Young

Los museos no solo contienen cultura y conocimiento, también representan a la cultura. Si la cultura se transforma, el museo debe hacerlo a su vez. Los museos modernos reciben una enorme presión desde la cultura del consumo que obliga a generar experiencias memorables a los visitantes que pueden rozar el espectáculo, ya paralelamente seducir al potencial visitante que no acude a los museos. En la búsqueda de los nuevos museos por un nuevo posicionamiento entre la sociedad, asistimos a cambios de toda clase y condición, comenzando por la reformulación de la arquitectura – edificios emblemáticos / arquitectos star system -, la aplicación de la nueva museología y la museografía moderna. Está claro que la tendencia de ahora en el futuro es que los museos se centren menos en su “contenido” para transformarse en relato. Un relato que nos fascine a todos.



Identidad Institucional: Museo del Helado / Brandemia

Podemos apoyarnos en 7 fundamentos para reconocer un Nuevo Museo:

1. El museo se enuncia a si mismo con un nombre sobre un tema: el museo del hombre, el museo del clima, el museo de la biología, el museo de los niños… Son temas-lema de gran dimensión, conceptos que no han sido hasta ahora motivo de creación de un museo. Los museos de arte moderno deberían reformular su denominación.

2. El museo se convierte en entidad activa. El dinamismo, la flexibilidad y la gestión del museo con equipos de trabajo buscan generar espacios culturales, artísticos y científicos con participación ciudadana. Evitan a toda costa convertirse en entidades aisladas y alejadas de la sociedad.

3. Se promueve una fusión entre arquitectura, museología y museografía. La arquitectura debe sacrificar espectacularidad para generar más espacios museográficos, siendo coherente con la temática del museo. Arquitectos, museólogos y museógrafos debe trabajar en equipo. A ver si es verdad.

4. Los recorrido de los museos se adaptan a los intereses de los visitantes ofreciendo múltiples opciones dirigidas. El perfil del visitante cada vez es más importante para la adaptación de los contenidos, entendiendo y haciendo nuestra la forma que tiene cada grupo social de entender la realidad.

5. El entorno urbano y paisajístico alrededor del museo se vuelve más importante, cada vez más. El museo debe integrarse en su medio urbano o natural, respondiendo a la coherencia del conjunto y dejando de ser edificios contenedores para transformarse en instrumentos de difusión del conocimiento – todo el conjunto del museo -.



Exposición “Remember Me” Museo Memorial de la Guerra de Australia

6. El museo debe defender y difundir valores universales que no generalistas y difusos. Los temas varían adaptándose a los tiempos que corren y a nuestra forma de ver el mundo que nos está tocando vivir. Un museo militar ya no debe mostrar armas en vitrinas sin más, debe enseñarnos a todos lo horrible y estúpida que es la maldita guerra.

7. El museo debe convertirse en un espacio amable de aprendizaje para todos, pero no solo apoyándose en su contenido sino también con la programación de todo tipo de actividades didácticas. Los museos modernos deben ser la referencia de la verdad y la responsabilidad social. Su discurso didáctico debe tener un principio, un desarrollo y un final.



Indianapolis Museum of Art / Matt Kelm Design

Resumiendo, la arquitectura debe fundirse con el proyecto museológico y el museográfico. Si en la reunión para la creación de un nuevo museo, o la renovación de uno que se ha quedado viejo, solo se convoca al arquitecto y a los promotores, mal empezamos. Decir también que los concursos son una absoluta aberración moderna, que, además, están formulados por personas que saben a muy poco de museos y que son una fuente irreparable de pérdidas económicas para los estudios que participen. Un nuevo museo puede convocar a un grupo de profesionales de los museos – de todos los ámbitos profesionales, incluida la jardinería – para provocar una tormenta de ideas, pero eso sí, remunerando su esfuerzo. Hoy ya nada es gratis; nos lo recuerdan los bancos todos los días, a todas horas. Es la única manera conocida de que la creatividad, de la mano de buenas y coherentes ideas, redunde en beneficio de la sociedad y no solo de juego a un pequeño grupo de privilegiados. Si no lo decimos, reventamos.



Cartel anunciador del Museo Andy Warhol

Cuando hablamos de nuevos museos, también nos referimos a los viejos que deben renovarse urgentemente si quieren seguir existiendo.

 fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti Espacio Visual Europa (EVE)

Staatliche Museen zu Berlin -

The Kunstgewerbemuseum (Museum of Decorative Arts) is the oldest of its kind in Germany. It houses world-famous examples of European arts and crafts from the early Middle Ages to the present day as well as outstanding collections of fashion and design, including magnificent reliquaries made of gold and precious gemstones, exquisite vases of glass and porcelain, finely embroidered textiles, ornate inlaid furniture and complete sets of wall panelling such as the Chamber of Mirrors from Schloss Wiesentheid, as well as classic examples of modern industrial design. The permanent and special exhibitions hosted by the Kunstgewerbemuseum can be seen at two locations in Berlin: at the Kulturforum near Potsdamer Platz and in the picturesque setting of Schloss Köpenick on an island on the river Dahme.



Das Kunstgewerbemuseum am Kulturforum | © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin / Maximilian Meisse


In the Baroque palace of Köpenick the Kunstgewerbemuseum presents examples of interior design from the 16th to 18th centuries. The museum at the Kulturforum was completed in 1985 to designs by Rolf Gutbrod, one of the leading German architects in the 1960s. Gutbrod’s trademark is that he allowed structural elements of his buildings to remain clearly visible. The museum is conceived as a ‘constructed landscape’ and together with its greenery makes reference to the adjacent Tiergarten park. While the building has a closed appearance from the outside, it welcomes visitors on the inside with an open stairwell and generous exhibition spaces. Visitors are encouraged to focus completely on the remarkable exhibits in the collection and to wander from one level to the next.

The Museum of Decorative Arts at the Kulturforum is closed since 2 January 2012 for reconstruction work which is being undertaken by the architects Kuehn Malvezzi. It will reopen at 21 November 2014.


Once it has reopened, the Kunstgewerbemuseum will offer visitors a comprehensive presentation across two floors of the museum, featuring the great accomplishments of European design and the decorative arts spanning the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo periods to Jugendstil and Art Deco. An entire exhibition space will be dedicated to classic design. Visitors can also expect a newly organised gallery of fashion with an extensive exhibition of costumes and accessories from the 18th to 20th century.

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.smb.museum/en/museums-and-institutions/kunstgewerbemuseum/home.html

À Giverny, le Musée des Impressionnistes racheté par les collectivités locales

Voisin de la maison de Claude Monet, cet établissement qui accueille très régulièrement des expositions était jusqu’ici propriété de la fondation américaine Terra.





ROBERT FRANCOIS/AFP
musée des impressionnistes de Giverny.





Il porte le nom de musée, mais cet établissement culturel a la particularité de ne pas posséder de collections propres. Installé non loin de la maison de Claude Monet et de son somptueux jardin, le Musée des Impressionnistes est, en réalité, un lieu d’expositions qui, depuis plus de 15 ans, a notamment fait découvrir au public la riche école des peintres américains influencés par le célèbre mouvement pictural français.
Un mécène américain

Les visiteurs du monde entier y affluent (plus d’un million durant et été 2014), associant la découverte du refuge normand de Monet à celle de ce musée qui appartenait jusqu’ici à la Fondation Terra, du nom de Daniel J. Terra (1911-1996), un mécène américain.

En 1992, cet ami des arts fortuné avait fait édifier le bâtiment, alors appelé Musée d’Art américain, et, depuis 2008, plusieurs collectivités locales (1) s’étaient regroupées en Établissement public de coopération culturelle (EPPC) pour en assurer la gestion. En effet, la Fondation Terra, tout en demeurant propriétaire des lieux, avait choisi de se retirer de l’exploitation du musée.

Le coût du rachat par les collectivités locales s’élève à 5 millions d’euros, alors que l’établissement et les biens attenants étaient estimés à 9,8 millions ; cette vente ne sera effective qu’en 2016.
Projets de développement

Fort de sa nouvelle cohérence, le musée espère renforcer ses partenariats, notamment avec la Fondation Monet et le musée d’Orsay, lancer divers projets de développement dont un « itinéraire culturel européen consacré à l’impressionnisme ».

Il va également répondre, en lien avec la région Île-de-France, à l’appel à projets « destinations touristiques » lancé par le ministère des Affaires étrangères.

Jusqu’au 2 novembre, le musée présente une exposition consacrée à « Bruxelles, une capitale impressionniste » : une centaine d’œuvres témoigne de l’accueil quasi-immédiat que connut l’Impressionnisme dans une ville où fleurirent les mouvements avant-gardistes dont l’Art Nouveau.

À Bruxelles, des toiles furent notamment présentées aux Salons des XX et de la Libre Esthétique, tandis que des peintres comme James Ensor, Émile Claus ou Théo Van Rysselberghe nourrissaient leur regard et leur style du travail de leurs « confrères » français.

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.la-croix.com/Culture/Expositions/A-Giverny-le-Musee-des-Impressionnistes-rachete-par-les-collectivites-locales-2014-10-26-1254722

Le succès au rendez-vous pour la Fiac et le musée Picasso

Le musée Picasso a accueilli 10.000 visiteurs pour le weekend de sa réouverture tandis que la Fiac s’est félicitée d’un «formidable engouement» avec plus de 74.000 visiteurs en quatre jours.

Des visiteurs au musée Picasso à Paris, le 25 octobre 2014 (Photo Patrick Kovarik. AFP)

Après cinq ans de rénovation, le musée Picasso a rouvert ses portes au public samedi midi et a accueilli 10.000 visiteurs ce weekend, un chiffre qualifié «d’exemplaire» par la direction, qui rappelle que le musée ne peut recevoir qu’un maximum de 700 personnes simultanément.

Pour sa 41ème édition, la Fiac, l’une des plus importantes foires d’art contemporain au monde, a attiré 74.567 visiteurs, en hausse de 1,4% par rapport à 2013.

«Je suis très satisfaite de cette Fiac 2014. Le succès est au rendez-vous. Le ressenti des galeries est extrêmement positif. Je suis heureuse d’avoir vu un public, parisien et étranger, extrêmement nombreux et joyeux», a déclaré à l’AFP Jennifer Flay, sa directrice.

Participants et organisateurs qui tablaient cette année sur une présence sans précédent de collectionneurs étrangers attirés par la nouvelle image de Paris sur la scène artistique actuelle, affichaient leur satisfaction, à l’issue d’une semaine artistique exceptionnelle pour Paris entre l’inauguration de la fondation Louis Vuitton lundi dernier et la réouverture du Musée Picasso samedi.

Pour l’un des responsables de la galerie britannique David Zwirner, Matt Glenn, «c’était une Fiac étonnante. Nous avons vendu beaucoup d’œuvres, c’est une très bonne foire pour nous». Une citrouille rouge à pois blancs («Pumpkin») de Yasoi Kusama a ainsi été cédée 600.000 dollars à un collectionneur.

Même appréciation pour Claudia Greve de la galerie Karsten Greve (Paris, Cologne, St-Moritz) : «C’est beaucoup mieux que les autres années, il y a plus de collectionneurs étrangers».

Parmi les plus belles ventes, une oeuvre de l’Américain Christopher Wool, s’est négociée dans une fourchette de 2,3/2,8 millions d’euros tandis qu’une peinture de l’Allemand Gerhard Richter a atteint 2,2 millions, selon un communiqué.

Quelques œuvres exceptionnelles n’ont cependant pas trouvé preneurs. L’imposante sculpture de Jean Dubuffet, intitulée «Cherche-aubaine» (Bargain hunter), appartenant au cycle de l’Hourloupe et vendue 2,2 millions de dollars par la galerie britannique Waddington Custot, n’a séduit aucun acheteur.

Une autre pièce de prestige, un cylindre de verre brut d’1,5 t de Roni Horn, mis en vente 3,4 millions de dollars par la galerie Hauser & Wirth (Zurich, Londres, New York), est restée sans acquéreur.

«Je reviens de Londres pour la Frieze Art Fair et je trouve que Paris, c’est un excellent équilibre entre quelque chose qui est classique et contemporain», estime Severine Waelchli, l’une des responsables de la galerie Thaddeus Ropac (Paris, Pantin, Salzbourg) qui expose Roberto Longo, Georg Baselitz ou Nan Goldin.

191 galeries venues de 26 pays étaient présentes sous la verrière du prestigieux Grand Palais. 65% d’entre elles étaient européennes contre 73% en 2013. Parmi les participants, la France arrivait en tête avec 48 galeries, suivie par les Etats-Unis (45) et l’Allemagne (26).

La FIAC s’était agrandie pour cette 41e édition, avec un nouvel événement baptisé (OFF)ICIELLE et ouvert aux «nouveaux territoires». Installée aux aux Docks - Cité de la Mode et du Design et reliée au Grand Palais par navette fluviale. (OFF)ICIELLE accueillait une soixantaine de galeries, revendiquant «un regard à 360°, à l’opposé de la standardisation».

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.liberation.fr/societe/2014/10/26/le-succes-au-rendez-vous-pour-la-fiac-et-le-musee-picasso_1130178

Museu Antropológico (MA) da Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG)



O Museu Antropológico (MA) da Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG) é uma instituição sem fins lucrativos, aberta ao público, e que se destina à coleta, inventário, documentação, preservação, segurança, exposição e comunicação de seu acervo.

Vinculado à Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa e Inovação (PRPI), o MA é um órgão suplementar da UFG, e tem em seu caráter dinâmico e pedagógico, suas principais características.

Foi criado por iniciativa de professores do então Departamento de Antropologia e Sociologia (DAS) da UFG, vinculado ao antigo Instituto de Ciências Humanas e Letras (ICHL), atual Faculdade de Ciências Sociais (FCS), a partir da realização de uma pesquisa no Parque Indígena do Xingu. Participaram dessa viagem de estudos os professores Acary de Passos Oliveira, Vivaldo Vieira da Silva, Antônio Theodoro da Silva Neiva e o Pe. José Pereira de Maria, já falecidos.


O acervo da primeira coleção etnográfica do Museu decorre dessa viagem. Em relatório de estudos remetido à Profa. Lena Castello Branco Ferreira, na ocasião diretora do ICHL, o grupo de professores sugere um plano de pesquisa com o objetivo de estudar as populações do Xingu e criar um museu antropológico na UFG. Esse espaço cultural foi proposto para salvaguardar a cultura material indígena da Região Centro-Oeste do Brasil. Com essa perspectiva, o Museu Antropológico da UFG foi criado em junho de 1969, sendo inaugurado em 5 de setembro de 1970.
 
fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://museu.ufg.br/pages/22114-historia