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sábado, 13 de dezembro de 2014

Pioneiro entre os museus russos comemora 300º aniversário

Museu com 1.800 minérios e rochas será inaugurado em Natal

Solenidade de inauguração acontece nesta quarta (17) no Campus do IFRN.
Museu dos Minérios será aberto a visitação de segunda a sexta.

Um museu com 1.800 exemplares de minerais e rochas será inaugurado na próxima quarta-feira (17) em Natal. O Museu de Minérios do Rio Grande do Norte irá funcionar nas dependências do Campus Natal-Central do Instituto Federal de Ciência e Tecnologia (IFRN). O espaço é resultado de um convênio assinado entre a Petrobras, o então Centro Federal de Educação Profissional e Tecnológica (Cefet), e a Funcern.

O Museu de Minérios estará aberto ao público em geral das 13h às 17h de segunda à sexta-feira. Já as visitas guiadas e pré-agendadas para colégios serão realizadas também durante a semana, mas apenas pela parte da manhã, das 8h às 12h. O acervo do Museu de Minérios do Rio Grande do Norte é formado por quatro coleções distintas.

A primeira, com cerca de 450 peças e doada pelo governo do Estado, é oriunda do Museu de Minérios Waldemar Meira Trindade, da extinta Companhia de Desenvolvimento Mineral do Rio Grande do Norte (CDM). A segunda, com 300 peças, foi cedida ao museu pelo professor Felippe Fernandez, da Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR); a terceira, também fruto de doação, pertencia a uma professora do IFRN; por fim, a maior de todas as coleções, com 750 peças, pertence à Diretoria de Recursos Naturais do Campus Natal-Central do IFRN.

"Teremos aqui um espaço onde o visitante poderá conhecer toda a produção mineral do RN de forma didática e acessível: petróleo, sal, cerâmica, schelita, ouro, ferro, rochas ornamentais, gemas, minerais de pegmatitos, calcário e a pré-história. Nenhum outro museu tem este olhar”, explicou a coordenadora do museu, a professora Narla Sahtler Musse de Oliveira.

Ao todo, foram investidos R$ 932.968 na construção e equipamento do museu, que ocupa uma área de 670,62 metros quadrados, divididos em dois pavimentos, com oito ambientes internos. Os recursos foram aportados pela Petrobras, sendo que R$ 523.187,20 foram provenientes de renúncia fiscal pelo governo do Estado, através da Lei Câmara Cascudo, em favor da companhia.


fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti Do G1 RN

2,400-Year-Old Coffin's 'Odd' Art Hints at Ancient Egypt's Brain Drain






TORONTO — An ancient Egyptian coffin with strange and amateurish decorations has been revealed, shedding light on a tumultuous period in Egyptian history when the Persian Empire was in control of the region.

In 525 B.C., Persian King Cambyses marched into Memphis, the Egyptian capital, inaugurating a period of Persian rule that would last for more than a century. The Persian Empire was a vast entity that stretched from modern-day Afghanistan to the west coast of Turkey. Ancient texts say that the Persian kings deported Egyptian artists and used them for building projects in Persia.

The coffin bears a series of unusual features that are likely related to the Persian Empire's deportation of artists. [See photos of the ancient Egyptian coffin]




"Many of the best artists in Egypt were taken by the Persians back to Persepolis and Susa as POWs and war booty — you can see their work in those places. There seems to have been a dearth of masters for some time, so that fewer and fewer artists got proper training," Gayle Gibson, an Egyptologist and educator at Toronto's Royal Ontario Museum, told Live Science in an email.

Gibson presented the coffin at the Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities Scholars' Colloquium, which was held Nov. 13 to 16 in Toronto.

Odd features

There are several odd features on the coffin that reflect the lack of knowledge the ancient artist had, Gibson said.

For instance, the deceased is depicted lying on a funerary bed, and the bed has a human-headed bird called a Ba. Flying over the deceased is a winged snake wearing a crown associated with the goddess Hathor. Below them are four jars bearing the heads of the four Sons of Horus, but the jars have a "goofy" appearance, Gibson said.

To an Egyptologist, this is a bizarre scene, Gibson said. "This is the only funerary bed I know of with a Ba's head," she told the Toronto audience, also noting that "we have a winged snake with Hathor's crown — very odd."

There are other oddities. The collar wrapped around the top of the coffin contains two creatures that look almost fishlike. The artist was likely trying to draw falcons, a symbol of the god Horus, but drew them very poorly, Gibson said.

A Mehen snake, a protective deity in Egypt, is also poorly drawn and actually stops at one point and starts in another, something strange for a protective deity. "The artist doesn't really understand the purpose of the Mehen snake," Gibson said. [Image Gallery: Egypt's Great Terrace of God]

Mike Sigler, a collector and Egyptian antiquities enthusiast who lives in Kentucky and now owns the coffin, sent a picture to Live Science showing that the ancient artist clumsily attempted to correct an error in an alternating pattern by scratching out an image of a scepter.

Ancient brain drain

Although there is no longer a mummy in the coffin, its inscriptions say that it belonged to someone named Denit-ast, or Dent-ast, likely a woman. Radiocarbon dating of her coffin indicates that she lived at a time when her country was under Persian control.

Ancient texts tell tales of the deportation of Egyptian artists to Persia during this time. Diodorus Siculus, who died around 30 B.C., said that Cambyses, the conqueror of Egypt, transferred both precious metals and artists from Egypt to Persia.

Additionally, Persian King Darius I bragged about the Egyptian artists he acquired in a text describing the construction of his palace at Susa. "The goldsmiths who wrought the gold, those were Mede and Egyptians. The men who wrought the wood, those were Sardians and Egyptians … the men who adorned the wall, those were Medes and Egyptians" Darius said (translation by Roland Kent).

Authentication

Gibson told the Toronto audience that when she first showed the coffin to other Egyptologists, some expressed skepticism and wondered if it was a fake created before Sigler owned it.

However, radiocarbon dating places the coffin in the Persian period and analysis of its wood indicates that it's sycamore, a wood that was commonly used in ancient Egypt. Additionally, an analysis of the coffin's blue pigments found that the pigment was Egyptian blue, which indicates that the coffin is authentic, Gibson said.

Sigler purchased the coffin in August 2013 from the Edgar L. Owen gallery, which sold it on behalf of a private collector. Paperwork that Sigler received indicates that the collector acquired it from the European art market in 1980. Its history before that is unknown.

Gibson is well-known for her Egyptological work. In the 1990s she helped identify a mummy in Niagara Falls, Canada, as likely being that of pharaoh Ramesses I. The mummy was later returned to Egypt with full military honors.

Given Gibson's reputation, Sigler sought her out and asked her for help in understanding the coffin's strange features.

Despite its odd features, Gibson believes the coffin is not a fake. "I think there is really no doubt that this one is genuine," she said.

Sigler told Live Science that he hopes to find other examples of the coffin's unusual imagery. He said that he is interested in donating the coffin to a museum in the future.

The pigment and wood analysis was carried out by Microscopist William Randle while radiocarbon dating was conducted at the University of Georgia’s Center for Applied Isotope Studies.
 
fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.livescience.com/49059-ancient-egyptian-coffin-odd-art.html?adbpl=tw


 A funerary scene from a 2,400-year-old Egyptian coffin.
Credit: Photo copyright: Mike Sigler








An odd funerary scene, brain drain

A statue honoring Brazilian singer-composer Antonio Carlos "Tom" Jobim was unveiled Monday at the Rio beach where the bossa nova legend immortalized with his song "The Girl from Ipanema."

RIO DE JANEIRO - Brazil
 
 
 Picture of the statue of late Brazilian musician and composer Antonio Carlos "Tom" Jobim, in Rio de Janeiro taken on December 8, 2014, day in which was unveiled. To commemorate the 20th anniversary of Jobim’s passing, Rio de Janeiro's City Hall placed a statue of the artist at Ipanema beach. AFP PHOTO / CHRISTOPHE SIMON.
 
Rio's city hall commissioned the 200 kilo (440 pound) bronze statue depicting Jobim with a guitar slung over his shoulder to mark the 20th anniversary of the star's death. "I chose to represent a young and handsome Tom Jobim showing him at the peak of his success in the 1960s," said sculptor Christina Motta. 
 
"The photo which acted as an inspiration is significant in that it was from the time when he and Vinicius de Moraes had just finished a symphony in Brasilia," Motta added. Jobim died in 1994 at the age of 67, three decades after his 1962 collaboration with Vinicius de Moraes on The Girl from Ipanema took the world of popular music by storm. 
 
The song paid tribute to the bronzed beauties who strutted along the beach in Rio's well-heeled Ipanema district just around the corner from Copacabana beach. One of the most recorded pop songs in history, The Girl from Ipanema album won a Grammy award in 1965 and was sung by many stars, including Frank Sinatra. 
 
A version of the song, a 1964 recording by singer Astrud Gilberto, guitarist Joao Gilberto and jazz saxophonist Stan Getz became a huge international hit. Jobim, who had Rio's international airport named after him in 1999, is considered one of Brazil's greatest musicians, having composed hundreds of songs and released more than 50 albums. 
 
 fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://artdaily.com/news/74951/Brazil-s--Girl-from-Ipanema--beach-gets-statue-of-composer-Antonio-Carlos--Tom--Jobim#.VIwzcMk768A

© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse
RIO DE JANEIRO (AFP).- A statue honoring Brazilian singer-composer Antonio Carlos "Tom" Jobim was unveiled Monday at the Rio beach where the bossa nova legend immortalized with his song "The Girl from Ipanema." Rio's city hall commissioned the 200 kilo (440 pound) bronze statue depicting Jobim with a guitar slung over his shoulder to mark the 20th anniversary of the star's death. "I chose to represent a young and handsome Tom Jobim showing him at the peak of his success in the 1960s," said sculptor Christina Motta. "The photo which acted as an inspiration is significant in that it was from the time when he and Vinicius de Moraes had just finished a symphony in Brasilia," Motta added. Jobim died in 1994 at the age of 67, three decades after his 1962 collaboration with Vinicius de Moraes on The Girl from Ipanema took the world of popular music by storm. The song paid tribute to the bronzed beauties who strutted along the beach in Rio's well-heeled Ipanema district just around the corner from Copacabana beach. One of the most recorded pop songs in history, The Girl from Ipanema album won a Grammy award in 1965 and was sung by many stars, including Frank Sinatra. A version of the song, a 1964 recording by singer Astrud Gilberto, guitarist Joao Gilberto and jazz saxophonist Stan Getz became a huge international hit. Jobim, who had Rio's international airport named after him in 1999, is considered one of Brazil's greatest musicians, having composed hundreds of songs and released more than 50 albums. © 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/74951/Brazil-s--Girl-from-Ipanema--beach-gets-statue-of-composer-Antonio-Carlos--Tom--Jobim#.VIwzcMk768A[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

Rarely-exhibited 18-century tapestries on view while Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art completes renovation

Rarely-exhibited 18-century tapestries on view while Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art completes renovation 
 
 
 
The Bulls of Mars, 1789, After a cartoon by Jean François de Troy. Woven by Royal Gobelins Manufacture, signed “Audran 1789.” Wool, silk, and linen. Gift of Elisha E. Hilliard, 1946.146. 
 
HARTFORD, CONN.- The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is displaying rarely-exhibited tapestries from the eighteenth century in its soaring Morgan Great Hall during the final phase of the museum’s five-year, $33 million renovation. The large, intricate tapestries—which depict the saga of Greek hero Jason—are on view Nov. 28, 2014, through April 2015, at which point the Great Hall will be transformed in preparation for the Sept. 19, 2015, grand reopening of the Morgan Memorial Building. 
 
The Jason Tapestries are enormous in size—ranging in height up to 14 feet, and in width up to 24 feet—presenting a challenge for curators in exhibiting them on a regular basis. 
 
“The sheer magnitude of these stunning woven treasures, when paired with their fragility, prevents the museum from showing them as frequently as we would wish,” said Susan L. Talbott, Director and C.E.O. “The changing of the guard in our magnificent Morgan Great Hall presented us an ideal window in which to share these masterpieces with our visitors, and it is our hope that everyone will take advantage of this marvelous opportunity.” 
 
The Jason Tapestries series was donated to the Wadsworth Atheneum in 1946. 
It consists of four tapestries from an original set of seven, which narrates the saga of Jason, well known to French contemporaries through the book Metamorphosis by Ovid. The tapestries depict Jason’s voyage with the Argonauts, the capture of the Golden Fleece (a symbol of kingship), and their subsequent return to Greece. Jason appears as a tragic hero—youthful, brave and clever—whose entanglement with the sorceress Medea will assure him the Fleece, but will also lead to the annihilation of his family. 
 
From the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries—the great period of tapestry weaving— popes, kings, and aristocrats alike competed for these luxurious pieces. Much more labor-intensive and expensive to produce than paintings and sculpture, tapestries served as portable sources of wealth, and were given as precious diplomatic gifts. Manufactories used the finest materials, such as silk threads that were often combined with silver and gold. The mythological (or historical and biblical) narratives depicted were often used to glorify heroic acts of the past and present. 
 
The story of Jason was one of the most popular tales to illustrate in tapestries of the late eighteenth century, the time of the Ancien Régime in France. In 1743, King Louis XV commissioned a seven-part Jason and Medea series for the Throne Room at Versailles, arguably the most prestigious room in France. Jean François de Troy (1679–1752) provided sketches that were later translated into life-size preparatory drawings and subsequently woven into tapestries at the Gobelins workshop. Other versions of this series were given as precious gifts by the French crown, and today belong to the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, the Royal Collections in Sweden, the Palazzo Reale in Milan and Windsor Castle in England, among others. 
 
Hartford native J. Pierpont Morgan, one of America’s richest men and greatest art collectors during the Gilded Age, donated the land and money to build the Beaux-arts Morgan Memorial. He also had a special interest in tapestries, and when the Great Hall opened in 1915, he loaned ten of them to adorn its walls. The space soon became known as “Tapestry Hall.”Morgan and his contemporaries saw themselves as the offspring of the old European aristocracy, who hung tapestries in the Great Halls of their country houses to demonstrate their power and influence, as well as to keep out the cold. The Wadsworth Atheneum will celebrate the centennial of the Morgan Memorial and its Great Hall in 2015; following the exhibition of The Jason Tapestries, Morgan Great Hall will be installed with masterworks from the museum’s permanent collection of European art, to open Sept. 19, 2015, as part of the unveiling of the restored building.

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti  http://artdaily.com/news/74908/Rarely-exhibited-18-century-tapestries-on-view-while-Wadsworth-Atheneum-Museum-of-Art-completes-renovation#.VIwwN8k768A[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
HARTFORD, CONN.- The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is displaying rarely-exhibited tapestries from the eighteenth century in its soaring Morgan Great Hall during the final phase of the museum’s five-year, $33 million renovation. The large, intricate tapestries—which depict the saga of Greek hero Jason—are on view Nov. 28, 2014, through April 2015, at which point the Great Hall will be transformed in preparation for the Sept. 19, 2015, grand reopening of the Morgan Memorial Building. The Jason Tapestries are enormous in size—ranging in height up to 14 feet, and in width up to 24 feet—presenting a challenge for curators in exhibiting them on a regular basis. “The sheer magnitude of these stunning woven treasures, when paired with their fragility, prevents the museum from showing them as frequently as we would wish,” said Susan L. Talbott, Director and C.E.O. “The changing of the guard in our magnificent Morgan Great Hall presented us an ideal window in which to share these masterpieces with our visitors, and it is our hope that everyone will take advantage of this marvelous opportunity.” The Jason Tapestries series was donated to the Wadsworth Atheneum in 1946. It consists of four tapestries from an original set of seven, which narrates the saga of Jason, well known to French contemporaries through the book Metamorphosis by Ovid. The tapestries depict Jason’s voyage with the Argonauts, the capture of the Golden Fleece (a symbol of kingship), and their subsequent return to Greece. Jason appears as a tragic hero—youthful, brave and clever—whose entanglement with the sorceress Medea will assure him the Fleece, but will also lead to the annihilation of his family. From the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries—the great period of tapestry weaving— popes, kings, and aristocrats alike competed for these luxurious pieces. Much more labor-intensive and expensive to produce than paintings and sculpture, tapestries served as portable sources of wealth, and were given as precious diplomatic gifts. Manufactories used the finest materials, such as silk threads that were often combined with silver and gold. The mythological (or historical and biblical) narratives depicted were often used to glorify heroic acts of the past and present. The story of Jason was one of the most popular tales to illustrate in tapestries of the late eighteenth century, the time of the Ancien Régime in France. In 1743, King Louis XV commissioned a seven-part Jason and Medea series for the Throne Room at Versailles, arguably the most prestigious room in France. Jean François de Troy (1679–1752) provided sketches that were later translated into life-size preparatory drawings and subsequently woven into tapestries at the Gobelins workshop. Other versions of this series were given as precious gifts by the French crown, and today belong to the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, the Royal Collections in Sweden, the Palazzo Reale in Milan and Windsor Castle in England, among others. Hartford native J. Pierpont Morgan, one of America’s richest men and greatest art collectors during the Gilded Age, donated the land and money to build the Beaux-arts Morgan Memorial. He also had a special interest in tapestries, and when the Great Hall opened in 1915, he loaned ten of them to adorn its walls. The space soon became known as “Tapestry Hall.” Morgan and his contemporaries saw themselves as the offspring of the old European aristocracy, who hung tapestries in the Great Halls of their country houses to demonstrate their power and influence, as well as to keep out the cold. The Wadsworth Atheneum will celebrate the centennial of the Morgan Memorial and its Great Hall in 2015; following the exhibition of The Jason Tapestries, Morgan Great Hall will be installed with masterworks from the museum’s permanent collection of European art, to open Sept. 19, 2015, as part of the unveiling of the restored building.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/74908/Rarely-exhibited-18-century-tapestries-on-view-while-Wadsworth-Atheneum-Museum-of-Art-completes-renovation#.VIwwN8k768A[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
Rarely-exhibited 18-century tapestries on view while Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art completes renovation The Bulls of Mars, 1789, After a cartoon by Jean François de Troy. Woven by Royal Gobelins Manufacture, signed “Audran 1789.” Wool, silk, and linen. Gift of Elisha E. Hilliard, 1946.146. Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on email Share on print Share on gmail More Sharing Services 22 HARTFORD, CONN.- The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is displaying rarely-exhibited tapestries from the eighteenth century in its soaring Morgan Great Hall during the final phase of the museum’s five-year, $33 million renovation. The large, intricate tapestries—which depict the saga of Greek hero Jason—are on view Nov. 28, 2014, through April 2015, at which point the Great Hall will be transformed in preparation for the Sept. 19, 2015, grand reopening of the Morgan Memorial Building. The Jason Tapestries are enormous in size—ranging in height up to 14 feet, and in width up to 24 feet—presenting a challenge for curators in exhibiting them on a regular basis. “The sheer magnitude of these stunning woven treasures, when paired with their fragility, prevents the museum from showing them as frequently as we would wish,” said Susan L. Talbott, Director and C.E.O. “The changing of the guard in our magnificent Morgan Great Hall presented us an ideal window in which to share these masterpieces with our visitors, and it is our hope that everyone will take advantage of this marvelous opportunity.” The Jason Tapestries series was donated to the Wadsworth Atheneum in 1946. It consists of four tapestries from an original set of seven, which narrates the saga of Jason, well known to French contemporaries through the book Metamorphosis by Ovid. The tapestries depict Jason’s voyage with the Argonauts, the capture of the Golden Fleece (a symbol of kingship), and their subsequent return to Greece. Jason appears as a tragic hero—youthful, brave and clever—whose entanglement with the sorceress Medea will assure him the Fleece, but will also lead to the annihilation of his family. From the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries—the great period of tapestry weaving— popes, kings, and aristocrats alike competed for these luxurious pieces. Much more labor-intensive and expensive to produce than paintings and sculpture, tapestries served as portable sources of wealth, and were given as precious diplomatic gifts. Manufactories used the finest materials, such as silk threads that were often combined with silver and gold. The mythological (or historical and biblical) narratives depicted were often used to glorify heroic acts of the past and present. The story of Jason was one of the most popular tales to illustrate in tapestries of the late eighteenth century, the time of the Ancien Régime in France. In 1743, King Louis XV commissioned a seven-part Jason and Medea series for the Throne Room at Versailles, arguably the most prestigious room in France. Jean François de Troy (1679–1752) provided sketches that were later translated into life-size preparatory drawings and subsequently woven into tapestries at the Gobelins workshop. Other versions of this series were given as precious gifts by the French crown, and today belong to the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, the Royal Collections in Sweden, the Palazzo Reale in Milan and Windsor Castle in England, among others. Hartford native J. Pierpont Morgan, one of America’s richest men and greatest art collectors during the Gilded Age, donated the land and money to build the Beaux-arts Morgan Memorial. He also had a special interest in tapestries, and when the Great Hall opened in 1915, he loaned ten of them to adorn its walls. The space soon became known as “Tapestry Hall.” Morgan and his contemporaries saw themselves as the offspring of the old European aristocracy, who hung tapestries in the Great Halls of their country houses to demonstrate their power and influence, as well as to keep out the cold. The Wadsworth Atheneum will celebrate the centennial of the Morgan Memorial and its Great Hall in 2015; following the exhibition of The Jason Tapestries, Morgan Great Hall will be installed with masterworks from the museum’s permanent collection of European art, to open Sept. 19, 2015, as part of the unveiling of the restored building.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/74908/Rarely-exhibited-18-century-tapestries-on-view-while-Wadsworth-Atheneum-Museum-of-Art-completes-renovation#.VIwwN8k768A[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

Il transforme sa maison en un musée du Mac. Un Américain se passionne à collectionner tous les anciens ordinateurs de la marque Apple depuis 2004…

Sa maison s’est transformée en un véritable musée… qu’il n’est pas possible de visiter!



Il y a des personnes qui collectionnent des timbres, d’autres – qui ont les moyens – préfèrent collectionner les voitures ou encore les trophées.de chasses, mais en ce qui concerne Mark Peck, ce sont plutôt les Mac qui l’intéresse! Depuis 2004, cet américain passe en effet son temps à débusquer et à acheter de vieux ordinateurs estampillés de la marque à la pomme. Mais pour lui, pas question de dépenser des milliers de dollars pour sa passion. Ce dernier entre en effet en contact avec des personnes qui souhaitent se séparer de ces “antiquités” pour gagner de la place dans leur grenier et/ou qui ne se rendent pas vraiment compte que certaines de ces pièces ont de la valeur… Du coup, il les achète sans se ruiner… Au fil des années, Mark Peck a accumulé plusieurs centaines d’appareils et sa maison s’est véritablement transformée en un musée du Mac… Parmi tous ses “trésors” se trouvent notamment un Mac 128K doté de la signature de Steve Jobs et de Steve Wozniak à l’intérieur de son châssis, plusieurs modèles d’Apple II, de Macintosh Portable, un Lisa et le tout premier modèle d’iPod.

Mark Peck n’ouvre cependant pas son “musée” au grand public. Il a toutefois lancé un site internet – au look très “vintage” – où il est possible de voir un aperçu sur sa collection avec quelques mots d’explication. Nul doute que les férus des premiers ordinateurs d’Apple pourraient toutefois être ravis de visiter cette véritable caverne d’Ali Baba!

Via Mac4Ever
 fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://belgium-iphone.lesoir.be/2014/12/11/il-transforme-sa-maison-en-un-musee-du-mac/
 
Galerie photos :


128k-front lisa-close-up lisa-general mac-portable-front-open open-back open-drives

Projet mammouth pour un musée

Le déménagement du musée d’histoire naturelle de La Chaux-de-Fonds dans le zoo du Bois du Petit Château est soumis en consultation populaire.
 
Arnaud Maeder avec l'affiche de la consultation populaire

Un musée qui s’installe dans un zoo, c’est une première européenne qui se prépare à La Chaux-de-Fonds. L’idée, c’est de transférer les 80’000 animaux naturalisés du Musée d’histoire naturelle dans un bâtiment à construire au zoo de Bois du Petit-Château, une fois l’ancien stand démoli.

Directeur des deux entités, Arnaud Maeder a lancé hier une consultation populaire en ligne «www.chaux-de-fonds.ch), en marge du P’tit Noël qui sera célébré dimanche prochain dans son zoo. Le questionnaire proposé servira à établir un projet répondant aux souhaits de la population.

Une musée payant dans un zoo gratuit? «Le premier profitera de la popularité du second», prévoit Arnaud Maeder. Avec 120’000 visiteurs par an, la fréquentation du zoo est dix fois supérieure à celle du musée. But visé moyennant 17 millions: 200’000 visiteurs au zoo gratuit et 50’000 au musée payant.

Les préparatifs du déménagement durent depuis un an. Premiers specimens préparés: les 500 oiseaux. Les mammifères suivront l’an prochain.

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.lematin.ch/suisse/Projet-mammouth-pour-un-musee/story/24002002

Prix du Musée 2015 du Conseil de l’Europe pour le MuCEM

Le Prix du Musée 2015 du Conseil de l’Europe a été décerné au Musée des civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée (MuCEM) de Marseille. Le musée, retenu parmi les trois candidats présélectionnés sur les 42 nommés, a été choisi par la Commission de la culture de l’Assemblée parlementaire du Conseil de l’Europe (APCE), lors d’une réunion qui s'est tenue, vendredi 5 décembre, à Paris. Le nom du lauréat sera officiellement annoncé à l'occasion de la clôture de l'assemblée annuelle du Forum européen du Musée (FEM) qui se tiendra à Glasgow (Ecosse) du 13 au 16 mai 2015.




 


Le MuCEM, dont l'architecture a été signée par le Français Rudy Ricciotti, étudie la Méditerranée, berceau des civilisations, à la croisée des cultures européenne et arabe. Selon la rapporteuse du Prix du Musée, la Serbe Vesna Marjanovic, deuxième vice-présidente de la Commission de la culture, de la science, de l'éducation et des médias au sein du Conseil de l'Europe, ce musée est fondé sur « un concept original et novateur, situé dans un lieu époustouflant et doté d’une architecture exceptionnelle ; il remplit parfaitement tous les critères du Prix du Musée du Conseil de l’Europe ». Mme Marjanovic a fait l’éloge du musée qui se veut une « agora contemporaine » attirant un vaste public grâce à une programmation impressionnante (visites pédagogiques, débats avec des artistes et des écrivains, séminaires, festivals et concerts).

Lire aussi : Jean-François Chougnet, nouveau patron du MuCEM
Une statuette en bronze et un diplôme

Le Prix du Musée du Conseil de l’Europe, attribué sur la base d’une sélection effectuée par le jury du Forum européen du Musée, récompense chaque année, depuis 1977, un établissement apportant une contribution importante à la connaissance du patrimoine culturel européen. Les dernières institutions à avoir obtenu ce prix sont le Musée Baksi en Turquie (2014), le Musée de Liverpool au Royaume-Uni (2013) et le Musée Rautenstrauch-Joest de Cologne en Allemagne (2012). Comme tous les lauréats de ce Prix du Musée du Conseil de l’Europe, le MuCEM va recevoir une statuette en bronze de Joan Miró, la Femme aux beaux seins, qu’il devra conserver durant un an, ainsi qu’un diplôme.

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.lemonde.fr/architecture/article/2014/12/12/prix-du-musee-2015-du-conseil-de-l-europe-pour-le-mucem_4539424_1809550.html