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domingo, 14 de dezembro de 2014

Archaeologists unearth tomb of Queen at the Mortuary Temple of Ramesses II

An Egyptian-French archaeological mission carrying out excavations at the Ramesseum temple on the west bank of Luxor have discovered a tomb dating back more than 3,000 years inscribed with, “the divine wife of God Amun”, an ancient Egyptian title given only to royal wives. The discovery has great historical importance as it sheds more light on the ancient figure, Karomama, whose name was found on statuettes within the tomb.
 
The Ramasseum, mortuary temple of Pharaoh Ramesses II, in Luxor


View of Luxor from within the RamesseumView of Luxor from within the Ramesseum

View of Luxor from within the Ramesseum. Source: BigStockPhoto

The Ramesseum is the mortuary temple of Pharaoh Ramesses II ("Ramesses the Great"). It is located in the Theban necropolis in Upper Egypt, across the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor. Ramesses II commissioned the construction of many buildings during his reign, and the most splendid of these, in accordance with New Kingdom Royal burial practices, would have been his memorial temple: a place of worship dedicated to pharaoh, god on earth, where his memory would have been kept alive after his death.


Stone carving of Ramesses II found at the Ramesseum. Source: BigStockPhoto

The Agence France-Presse (AFP) announced that it was during ongoing investigations at the Ramesseum that the new discovery of the Queen’s tomb was made. Although not spectacular in terms of treasures or decoration, the tomb provides important new information about the title “Karomama”.

“The tomb is relatively small with a stone door leading to a 5-meter shaft and a burial chamber, where funerary equipments, offerings and 20 well-preserved statuettes were found,” Abdel-Hakim Karar, director of the Upper Egypt Antiquities Department told The Cairo Post.

The statuettes, found by the tomb’s entrance, bore the name of “Karomama” and hieroglyphic inscriptions describe her as “the earthly spouse of the god Amun.”
 


Ushabtis Of Karomama Found At The Temple Of Ramses II Ushabtis Of Karomama Found At The Temple Of Ramses II

Ushabtis Of Karomama Found At The Temple Of Ramses II - Courtesy Of The Antiquities Ministry’s Facebook Page

The Louvre houses a unique bronze statuette of Karomama that was brought to France following the Napoleon’s mission to Egypt (1798 – 1801).

“She was a Divine Adoratrice, a virgin and earthly spouse of the god Amun, who was worshiped at Karnak. She held the status of a queen, and is portrayed in a robe encircled by vulture wings,” writes the Louvre in a description about the statuette. “Her life was devoted entirely to the god, and she performed the religious rites in the Temple of Karnak, rattling the sistrums to please and pacify Amun. She ruled as a sovereign in her own right and wore the royal insignia; her names were enclosed in cartouches.”

The archaeological team who made the discovery was led by Christian Leblanc, a French archaeologist, who has been excavating at the Ramesseum since the 1980s.


Statues at the Ramesseum, LuxorStatues at the Ramesseum, Luxor

Statues at the Ramesseum, Luxor. Source: BigStockPhoto

“The new discovery may not be spectacular from the artistic point of view, but due to the scarcity of Karomama’s artifacts that have been discovered so far, it is definitely a significant find as it sheds more light on her life,” Leblanc was quoted by the Pharaoh Magazine.

During the Ramesside Period – the Nineteenth Dynasty (1314-1200 BC) and Twentieth Dynasty (1200-1085 BC) – eleven kings were named Ramesses, so it is not clear who Karomama was married to. It is hoped that further investigations may unravel her story.

Featured image: The Ramasseum, mortuary temple of Pharaoh Ramesses II, in Luxor. Source: BigStockPhoto

- fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/archaeologists-unearth-tomb-queen-mortuary-temple-ramesses-ii-002444#sthash.ZzJ03CI0.dpuf

Archaeologists unearth tomb of Queen at the Mortuary Temple of Ramesses II

An Egyptian-French archaeological mission carrying out excavations at the Ramesseum temple on the west bank of Luxor have discovered a tomb dating back more than 3,000 years inscribed with, “the divine wife of God Amun”, an ancient Egyptian title given only to royal wives. The discovery has great historical importance as it sheds more light on the ancient figure, Karomama, whose name was found on statuettes within the tomb.
View of Luxor from within the Ramesseum
View of Luxor from within the Ramesseum. Source: BigStockPhoto
The Ramesseum is the mortuary temple of Pharaoh Ramesses II ("Ramesses the Great"). It is located in the Theban necropolis in Upper Egypt, across the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor. Ramesses II commissioned the construction of many buildings during his reign, and the most splendid of these, in accordance with New Kingdom Royal burial practices, would have been his memorial temple: a place of worship dedicated to pharaoh, god on earth, where his memory would have been kept alive after his death.
Stone carving of Ramesses II found at the Ramesseum. Source: BigStockPhoto
The Agence France-Presse (AFP) announced that it was during ongoing investigations at the Ramesseum that the new discovery of the Queen’s tomb was made. Although not spectacular in terms of treasures or decoration, the tomb provides important new information about the title “Karomama”.
“The tomb is relatively small with a stone door leading to a 5-meter shaft and a burial chamber, where funerary equipments, offerings and 20 well-preserved statuettes were found,” Abdel-Hakim Karar, director of the Upper Egypt Antiquities Department told The Cairo Post.
The statuettes, found by the tomb’s entrance, bore the name of  “Karomama” and hieroglyphic inscriptions describe her as “the earthly spouse of the god Amun.”
Ushabtis Of Karomama Found At The Temple Of Ramses II
Ushabtis Of Karomama Found At The Temple Of Ramses II - Courtesy Of The Antiquities Ministry’s Facebook Page
The Louvre houses a unique bronze statuette of Karomama that was brought to France following the Napoleon’s mission to Egypt (1798 – 1801).
“She was a Divine Adoratrice, a virgin and earthly spouse of the god Amun, who was worshiped at Karnak. She held the status of a queen, and is portrayed in a robe encircled by vulture wings,” writes the Louvre in a description about the statuette. “Her life was devoted entirely to the god, and she performed the religious rites in the Temple of Karnak, rattling the sistrums to please and pacify Amun. She ruled as a sovereign in her own right and wore the royal insignia; her names were enclosed in cartouches.”
The archaeological team who made the discovery was led by Christian Leblanc, a French archaeologist, who has been excavating at the Ramesseum since the 1980s.
Statues at the Ramesseum, Luxor
Statues at the Ramesseum, Luxor. Source: BigStockPhoto
“The new discovery may not be spectacular from the artistic point of view, but due to the scarcity of Karomama’s artifacts that have been discovered so far, it is definitely a significant find as it sheds more light on her life,” Leblanc was quoted by the Pharaoh Magazine.
During the Ramesside Period – the Nineteenth Dynasty (1314-1200 BC) and Twentieth Dynasty (1200-1085 BC) – eleven kings were named Ramesses, so it is not clear who Karomama was married to. It is hoped that further investigations may unravel her story.
Featured image: The Ramasseum, mortuary temple of Pharaoh Ramesses II, in Luxor. Source: BigStockPhoto
- See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/archaeologists-unearth-tomb-queen-mortuary-temple-ramesses-ii-002444#sthash.ZzJ03CI0.dpuf

Archaeologists unearth tomb of Queen at the Mortuary Temple of Ramesses II

An Egyptian-French archaeological mission carrying out excavations at the Ramesseum temple on the west bank of Luxor have discovered a tomb dating back more than 3,000 years inscribed with, “the divine wife of God Amun”, an ancient Egyptian title given only to royal wives. The discovery has great historical importance as it sheds more light on the ancient figure, Karomama, whose name was found on statuettes within the tomb.
View of Luxor from within the Ramesseum
View of Luxor from within the Ramesseum. Source: BigStockPhoto
The Ramesseum is the mortuary temple of Pharaoh Ramesses II ("Ramesses the Great"). It is located in the Theban necropolis in Upper Egypt, across the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor. Ramesses II commissioned the construction of many buildings during his reign, and the most splendid of these, in accordance with New Kingdom Royal burial practices, would have been his memorial temple: a place of worship dedicated to pharaoh, god on earth, where his memory would have been kept alive after his death.
Stone carving of Ramesses II found at the Ramesseum. Source: BigStockPhoto
The Agence France-Presse (AFP) announced that it was during ongoing investigations at the Ramesseum that the new discovery of the Queen’s tomb was made. Although not spectacular in terms of treasures or decoration, the tomb provides important new information about the title “Karomama”.
“The tomb is relatively small with a stone door leading to a 5-meter shaft and a burial chamber, where funerary equipments, offerings and 20 well-preserved statuettes were found,” Abdel-Hakim Karar, director of the Upper Egypt Antiquities Department told The Cairo Post.
The statuettes, found by the tomb’s entrance, bore the name of  “Karomama” and hieroglyphic inscriptions describe her as “the earthly spouse of the god Amun.”
Ushabtis Of Karomama Found At The Temple Of Ramses II
Ushabtis Of Karomama Found At The Temple Of Ramses II - Courtesy Of The Antiquities Ministry’s Facebook Page
The Louvre houses a unique bronze statuette of Karomama that was brought to France following the Napoleon’s mission to Egypt (1798 – 1801).
“She was a Divine Adoratrice, a virgin and earthly spouse of the god Amun, who was worshiped at Karnak. She held the status of a queen, and is portrayed in a robe encircled by vulture wings,” writes the Louvre in a description about the statuette. “Her life was devoted entirely to the god, and she performed the religious rites in the Temple of Karnak, rattling the sistrums to please and pacify Amun. She ruled as a sovereign in her own right and wore the royal insignia; her names were enclosed in cartouches.”
The archaeological team who made the discovery was led by Christian Leblanc, a French archaeologist, who has been excavating at the Ramesseum since the 1980s.
Statues at the Ramesseum, Luxor
Statues at the Ramesseum, Luxor. Source: BigStockPhoto
“The new discovery may not be spectacular from the artistic point of view, but due to the scarcity of Karomama’s artifacts that have been discovered so far, it is definitely a significant find as it sheds more light on her life,” Leblanc was quoted by the Pharaoh Magazine.
During the Ramesside Period – the Nineteenth Dynasty (1314-1200 BC) and Twentieth Dynasty (1200-1085 BC) – eleven kings were named Ramesses, so it is not clear who Karomama was married to. It is hoped that further investigations may unravel her story.
Featured image: The Ramasseum, mortuary temple of Pharaoh Ramesses II, in Luxor. Source: BigStockPhoto
- See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/archaeologists-unearth-tomb-queen-mortuary-temple-ramesses-ii-002444#sthash.ZzJ03CI0.dpuf

The New Cooper Hewitt - You may have heard that the new Cooper Hewitt has touch-screen tables, an interactive Immersion Room, and, arriving in early 2015, a special pen that will allow museumgoers to virtually collect items from their visit.

In an essay on the work of Charles and Ray Eames, the design critic Ralph Caplan fixes upon a quote from Charles: “The details are not the details. They make the product. The connections, the connections, the connections.” “Connections between what?” Caplan then asks rhetorically, answering, “Between such disparate materials as wood and steel, between such seemingly alien disciplines as physics and painting, between clowns and mathematical concepts, between people—architects and mathematicians and poets and philosophers and corporate executives.”


  Credit Courtesy Cooper Hewitt



If that’s the task of the designer, imagine the task of the design museum that must explain all the connections—a design problem itself. How to bring together building models and slide rules and folios and quill pens and executive desks from over the centuries, explain their origins, tell the stories of their use, and make a visually dramatic display, without being boring or pandering? More prosaically, how do you make people pay to see forks and phones, when we have forks at home and phones in our pockets? That’s been the struggle for the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum for many years. In 2011, the museum took the major step of closing its heavy front doors for what it was calling a transformation. Today, they open to the public again.



You may have heard that the new Cooper Hewitt has touch-screen tables, an interactive Immersion Room, and, arriving in early 2015, a special pen that will allow museumgoers to virtually collect items from their visit. But what it also has are lots of fascinating, three-dimensional objects. What the new Cooper Hewitt is trying to do is to love things and the Internet of things at the same time.

The first thing you may notice: they fixed the logo. What once was Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution is Cooper Hewitt, no hyphen, in a bold all-caps, sans-serif font designed by Chester Jenkins, of Village; it’s available for download, should you need to revivify an institution. The decision by the graphic-design team, led by Pentagram’s Eddie Opara, to keep the founders’ names rather than blowing up “design” or “Smithsonian” feels like a new peace with the museum’s roots, its historical collections, and its glorious mansion.

At a time when so many museums seem intent on new spaces for new design and new art (like the Whitney, Upper East Side deserter), it’s a relief that the Cooper Hewitt finally spent the time and the money to make their 1902 Carnegie Mansion sing. Rather than being a straightjacket, the mansion’s ornate rooms and halls now form a rich and idiosyncratic frame for design objects of all ages. Gluckman Mayner and Beyer Blinder Belle worked together on restoring, updating, and adding to the architecture. The cases, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, are crisp and clean, designed for sightlines and visual connections across the grand salons. The firm, as it did at Lincoln Center, has also jazzed up the outside: a new typographic canopy on Ninetieth Street leeeeans toward Fifth Avenue, and there’s L.E.D. lighting on the granite piers out front. Another example of new and old meeting in an elegant place is Boym Partners’ rendering of the mansion as emoticon: architecture transformed into “#”s, “+”s, and “[]”s, and applied to mugs, playing cards, and notebooks.

If you’re already tired of designers’ names, well, that’s part of the lesson here. Design is not made by one pair of hands, and the team effort required to restore, redesign, fit out, and rebrand a design museum shouldn’t be lumped under the name of one famous, usually male person. Each element that you interact with (and there is a lot of interaction) was created by a different set of skilled people, before you even arrive at the objects on display. It’s only fairly recently that museums have credited Charles Eames and his wife (not brother), Ray, with much of their work, as well as investigated the other talented hands in the Eames office. Courtesy Cooper Hewitt

The renovated museum now has four floors of galleries, and sixty per cent more exhibition space. The new exhibitions on the first floor ease you into it. “Beautiful Users,” curated by Ellen Lupton, concerns user-centric design and data-gathering. It features many familiar and everyday products, tweaked to make them easier, more flexible, and “smarter.” These include Sabi’s pillboxes, the 3D-printable Free Universal Construction Kit (because why can’t Tinkertoy, Lego, and Zoob just get along?), and the 2011 Nest thermostat, appropriately displayed next to its design grandfather, Henry Dreyfuss’s 1953 Honeywell Round. Much of the coverage of the Nest focussed on the designer Tony Fadell’s short-term callback to his work on the original iPod wheel; we need design museums to point out that there were round thermostats before Fadell was born.

Next door, there’s “Maira Kalman Selects,” the artist’s meditation on time that’s told through a selection of objects, including Abraham Lincoln’s pocket watch, children’s books, and fragile glasses. On one podium, Kalman quotes Charles Dickens: “One lives only to make blunders.” Then, around the corner, a Process Lab—a chance to D.I.Y. Stubby pencils and paper, and the command to “Try it!”: mash up two objects from your purse or backpack, or add gels, twist ties, and wire to customize a gooseneck lamp. Interactive museum-going isn’t just for kids.

If you feel like you already know something about design, though, I’d recommend heading straight up the stairs to the second floor, where four exhibits highlight different aspects of the museum’s permanent collection. I understand that the museum is reintroducing itself as an accessible, hands-on sort of place, but I missed the Cooper Hewitt’s equivalent of MoMA’s helicopter: something big and beautiful and immediate that you are not expecting to see in a museum. Maybe DS+R’s swoopy visitor-services desk is supposed to be that, but it read as Zaha lite—and, with white Sayl chairs behind it, a little like the “Hunger Games” control room.

The real futuristic moment is upstairs, in the Immersion Room: a touch-screen table, developed by Local Projects and Ideum, catercorner to the door, facing a pair of blank walls. A river of patterned circles wends its way across the middle of the table. Tap a circle and the pattern pops onto those walls, immersing you in what is now a period room decorated with one of two hundred wallpapers from the collection. Delft tiles or faux concrete, mossy lace or trompe l’oeil picture frames—the variety, complexity, and scene-setting power of wallpaper is on display. There’s something delightful in using technology to animate the fustiest of design-museum categories; it’s not only a gimmick but an updated version of flipping through swatch books. (Now they just need to get the color corrected.) Let’s not confuse looking with acting like a designer, though. To get a taste of that, play with another feature of the tables that lets you draw a pattern and see it repeated on the walls, which seems closer in spirit, and in clunky results, to the pencil-and-paper sketching offered downstairs.

More traditional, but just as spectacular, is the long, south-facing second-floor gallery that is split by a stair-stepped white display case fitted out with three hundred and fifty items from the museum’s permanent collection. These are arranged by loose, suggestive themes such as “Color” and “Line,” juxtaposing industrial design, fashion, graphics, and tableware from many decades. It is hard to resist the pull of the red area, with Ettore Sottsass’s Valentine typewriter, a noodle chair by the Campana Brothers, and a classic bandana. On the wall opposite, illustrating “Line,” the curators combine one of Joris Laarman’s baroque 2007 radiators, Milton Glaser’s 1966 Bob Dylan poster, and a waveform cut-paper stencil from turn-of-the-century Japan. That’s creative curation, one that generates an infinite string of your own sinuous visual references.

If your mental image search is lacking, that’s where more of those iPhone-like tables (there are seven total) could help. Draw a curve on the surface and the table presents something from the collection that contains the same shape, whether an arabesque in a textile or the outer bulge of a vase. You can also watch the river of circular vignettes running down the middle of the table, and tap on something you recognize or would like to see more of. Up it pops, with credits, tags, and a row of items deemed algorithmically similar. Both of these functions were enriching, and I could how they could be used to gain deep knowledge on the spot, after viewing the real things before you.

The critic Justin Davidson already sounded the alarm about all that D.I.Y. tech undermining the curators’ thinking. The tables are indeed like a bigger, better version of your ever-distracting phone. If you spend your time at the Cooper Hewitt parked at one, you might as well be at home surfing the Internet. But there is a reason why the tables don’t have chairs and don’t make noise: you can ignore them, and long-term loitering would be pretty uncomfortable. The combination, in a smaller gallery, of a big table in front of a whole wall hung with the founding Hewitt sisters’ collections seemed very smart. It made an easy connection between the plenty in three dimensions and in the digital sphere. The one place I found a table obtrusive was in the second-floor hallway, where prime real estate could have been used for a few more I.R.L. objects—including a historic table.

It’s a shame, then, to arrive on the third floor and feel a loss of energy. Here’s where the museum finally got the plain, flexible, six-thousand-square-foot gallery it has been wanting for years. This gallery has been installed with the truly topical exhibition “Tools: Extending Our Reach,” curated by Cara McCarty and Matilda McQuaid, with tools, patents, code, and tunnel borers from all branches of the Smithsonian. As our handheld electronics are called upon to be more and more multi-functional, it’s important to reconsider how we got from hand axes to silvery solids, and to recognize all the ways in which design augments our abilities. There is a homely early-twentieth-century child’s tool chest, from the National Museum of American History, that provides an inadvertent lesson in the continuum of gender stereotyping (“Bliss … for Boys”), and there are out-of-this-world displays like the Solar Wall, from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. (I chatted with the scientist who designed the software that lets us look at the sun.) Downstairs, it felt as if the elements were speaking to one another, and they came together in vivid tableaux. Up on the third floor, Thinc, the exhibition designers for “Tools,” spaced things out and made it harder to make temporal or cross-disciplinary leaps. I loved the giant slide rule—a classroom model—hanging from the ceiling, but what came next? What came before? My mind strayed to Maira Kalman’s selections, and a numbered sampler upon which a nineteenth-century girl had practiced her stitches.

Which is another way of saying: I made a connection. A museum reopening after a three-year hiatus has to flood the zone: six thousand here, three hundred and fifty there, two hundred there. Hacking and 3D-printing and interactive. But I do think, once the excitement dies down, that there are many things to discover on the walls and in the cases, plus a glorious mansion (with a perfect new downtown-minimal staircase) to explore, classes to take, and, indeed, tables to fondle. If a Luddite and a technologist were to fall in love, the Cooper Hewitt would be an excellent place to do it—and the museum shop could provide the engagement gift.

 fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/new-cooper-hewitt?mbid=social_twitter

Curled up for 1,000 years: Peruvian mummy found sitting in foetal position in pre-Inca burial site goes on display

More than 1,000 years ago, this 50-year-old woman was laid to rest in a ceremonial ritual in the ancient settlement of Pachacamac, near Lima, Peru.

The mummified skeleton, which was found in a vast burial site just yards from the long-abandoned civilisation's temple, was discovered in a foetal position.

Careful not to damage the well-preserved body of the woman, archaeologists have kept her in the same state she was found in as they prepare to unveil the mummy for a French museum exhibition.




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The mummified skeleton of a 50-year-old woman, found in a foetal position in an ancient burial site in Peru, will go on display this week




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Careful not to damage the well-preserved body of the woman, archaeologists have kept her in the same state she was found in as they prepare to unveil the mummy




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Experts carefully lower the woman, discovered in the ancient civilisation of Pachacamac, as they prepare the skeleton for its unveiling at the Musee de Confluences, in Lyon, later this month

The mummy will be revealed to the public at the Musee de Confluences, in Lyon, when it opens later this month.

From a pre-Inca civilisation, the frail skeleton will form part of the new museum's exploration of human representations of death in different ages and cultures around the world.






Pachacamac, based around 25 miles south of the Peruvian capital, was situated on the Pacific coastline. More than 80 skeletons and mummies - including infants who appeared to have been killed for ritual reasons - were found in a spectacular 1,000-year-old tomb at the site in 2012. Beyond these bodies, a further 70 skeletons and mummies - all in the fetal position - were lying around, most of them still wrapped up.




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The frail skeleton will form part of the new museum's exploration of human representations of death




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The Pachacamac civilisation, based around 25 miles south of the Peruvian capital, followed the god Pacha Kamaq - who they believed created the first man and first woman




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Pachacamac, with its temple and 17 pyramids, is revered as one of the most significant ancient settlements in South America




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The mummy as found by the Ychsma Project, directed by of the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium

The thousands who lived in the ancient town, which existed between the years 800 and 1450, followed the god Pacha Kamaq - who they believed created the first man and first woman.

The townsfolk, who built 17 pyramids, merged with the Incas as they conquered much of South America.

The monumental site, which covers almost 600 hectares of arid land, is considered one of the most important ancient settlements in South America, widely thought to be as significant as Machu Picchu and the Nazca Lines.

The mummy as found by the Ychsma Project, directed by of the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium, which has held archaeological digs in Pachacamac since 1999




Amazing 3D scan of the cartonnage of a mummy (related)


fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2872483/Peruvian-mummy-1-000-years-old-curled-foetal-position-pre-Inca-burial-site-goes-display-French-museum.html#ixzz3LuTysTMJ 

Museu do Benfica é o Museu Português do Ano 2014

O Museu Benfica – Cosme Damião, em Lisboa, foi distinguido com o Prémio Museu Português 2014, atribuído pela Associação Portuguesa de Museologia (APOM), anunciou esta entidade.

De acordo com o palmarés anunciado pela APOM, em Lisboa, o Museu da Imprensa, na Madeira, e o Museu do Vinho e da Vinha, em Bucelas, receberam menções honrosas nesta categoria, que distingue o melhor museu português do ano.

O Museu do Benfica foi inaugurado em Julho de 2013 no complexo do Estádio da Luz, em Lisboa, para dar a conhecer a história do Sport Lisboa e Benfica. Batizado com o nome do fundador, jogador e dirigente Cosme Damião (1885-1947), o museu está dividido em 29 áreas temáticas e reúne cerca de um milhar de troféus conquistados pelas diferentes modalidades do clube. Possui uma coleção de 20 mil objetos e documentação ligada à história do Benfica, inseridos num percurso que evoca o contexto sociocultural de Portugal.

A APOM, entidade dedicada à museologia, atribui os prémios anualmente, desde 1997, a museus, projetos, profissionais e atividades desenvolvidas no setor.
Museu Benfica1
fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.movenoticias.com/2014/12/museu-do-benfica-e-o-museu-portugues-do-ano-2014/

Línguas indígenas podem sumir de RR em 15 anos, diz Museu do Índio

Roraima tem 8 idiomas; falta de produção influencia na perda da cultura. Universidade Federal de Roraima tenta reverter situação criando métodos.
 


Um levantamento do Museu do Índio, órgão que faz a documentação de línguas indígenas, constatou que nos próximos 15 anos os idiomas podem desaparecer de Roraima. Atualmente, no estado são falados o Wapichana, Macuxi, Taurepang, Wai-Wai, Iekuana, Yanomani, Ingarikó e Sapará. A Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR) tenta criar métodos para evitar que as línguas desapareçam.

Celino Raposo, indígena da comunidade da Raposa, disse que crianças e adultos falavam Macuxi na região nos anos 80, algo que não acontece hoje. "Aquelas pessoas que produziam foram deixando aos poucos e agora estão mais velhas", afirmou, complementando que a falta de produção no idioma indígena influencia na perda da cultura.

Segundo Amanda Machado, coordenadora do Programa de Valorização de Línguas e Culturas Macuxi e Wapichana da UFRR, 'a língua é uma questão de sobrevivência cultural'. A coordenadora afirmou que os idiomas indígenas guardam conhecimentos preciosos para a Universidade. "A gente tenta fazer o nosso papel [de preservar as línguas] da melhor forma possível. Estamos nos reunindo com os professores de línguas e produzindo material", afirmou.

"A gente está aqui na Universidade justamente para fazer com que o aluno tenha consciência de sua identidade própria e sua importância", afirmou Celino, que é coordenador do curso de Licenciatura Intercultural, que forma professores incentivadores da autoafirmação da identidade indígena.

fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://g1.globo.com/rr/roraima/noticia/2014/12/linguas-indigenas-podem-sumir-de-rr-em-15-anos-diz-museu-do-indio.html
Com informações da TV Roraima
Segundo estudo, idiomas podem desaparecer em 15 anos (Foto: Reprodução/TV Roraima) 
Segundo estudo, idiomas podem desaparecer em
15 anos (Foto: Reprodução/TV Roraima)
 

Ouzbékistan : un musée volé par son propre conservateur

Le conservateur du Musée national des Arts de Tachkent en Ouzbékistan a été condamné ce vendredi, après avoir remplacé les oeuvres de la collection par des copies. Depuis 15 ans, il récupérait les originales avant de les vendre sur le marché noir.





Mirfaïz Ousmanov a été condamné à neuf ans de prison pour avoir échanger des œuvres originales par des copies avant de les vendre au marché noir.


Mirfaïz Ousmanov devra ainsi purger une peine de neuf ans de prison, tandis que deux de ses employés, complices dans l'affaire, ont été condamnés à huit ans de prison d'après le quotidien ouzbek Huquq. Les trois hommes sont accusés d'avoir remplacé entre 1999 et 2014 des dizaines de tableaux d'artistes européens, comme ceux du peintre et sculpteur de la Renaissance italienne Lorenzo di Credi. Viktor Oufimtsev et Alexander Nikolaev, artistes d'avant-garde soviétiques ont également été la victime de cette supercherie. Non cotés sur le marché de l'art, leurs œuvres ont aussi été vendues, à des prix oscillant entre 80 et 650 euros.

Principal musée d'Ouzbékistan, le Musée national des Arts de Tachkent avait déjà vu sa collection tronquée de plusieurs oeuvres. Certaines auraient été confisquées par Goulnara Karimova, la propre fille aînée du président du pays Islom Karimov, d'après des dissidents ouzbeks.


fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti http://www.lefigaro.fr/arts-expositions/2014/12/12/03015-20141212ARTFIG00293-ouzbekistan-un-musee-vole-par-son-propre-conservateur.php