Google+ Followers

sábado, 6 de maio de 2017

A Major Exhibition Recasts the Influence of Italian Sculptor Medardo Rosso. --- Uma grande exposição refaz a influência do escultor italiano Medardo Rosso.

Peers like Auguste Rodin may have overshadowed Rosso, but time has vindicated him as a decisive contributor to the birth of Modernism.





Medardo Rosso, “Enfant malade (Sick Child)” (1893–95), bronze, 10 x 5 3/4 x 6 1/2 inches, Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milano (all images courtesy Pulitzer Arts Foundation).

ST. LOUIS — An extensive study of the little-known turn-of-the-century Italian sculptor Medardo Rosso, Experiments in Light and Form, now on view at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis, does the important work of rescuing specificity from history. I fell in love with each of Rosso’s sculptures individually, as well as the way architecture by Tadao Ando held the difficult forms lightly on their pedestals, giving each work more than enough space to tell its story. Rosso’s sculptures run the gamut of sensations, from evil to angelic, while maintaining an uneasy chiaroscuro abstraction. Peers like Auguste Rodin may have overshadowed Rosso, but time has vindicated him as a decisive contributor to the birth of Modernism.

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, installation view (photograph by Jim Corbett © 2016 Alise O’Brien Photography).

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, installation view (photograph by Jim Corbett © 2016 Alise O’Brien Photography)

Rosso falls into the stereotype of an “artist’s artist.” Experts on his work hypothesize that he wasn’t just influential in the Parisian avant-garde during the emergence of Modernism, but that he also had a productive impact on artists like Pablo Picasso, Constantin Brancusi, and Henri Matisse. Brancusi’s slick and elegant sculptural forms echo famous works by Rosso, like “Enfant Malade” (1893–95) and “Madame X” (1896). Matisse and Picasso’s gestures and textures with oil paint mirror the surfaces of Rosso’s rough edges.

Prior to an extensive exhibition at the Center for Italian Modern Art in 2014, Rosso hadn’t been featured in a major US show in more than 50 years, since his 1963 show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Meanwhile, Brancusi’s “La Muse Endormie” (1913) is scheduled for auction at Christie’s for an estimated $20 to $30 million in a few weeks. Once the connection is made, it’s impossible not to see Rosso’s sculpture of the sick child in Brancusi’s bust with the same angular, lean features, Brancusi’s lovingly rendered muse reflecting the soft oblong face of the ailing youngster. Walking through the galleries at the Pulitzer, I kept thinking of the textures in Käthe Kollwitz’s charcoal portraits and woodcuts of abstracted, everyday suffering. How far-reaching was this unsung hero’s influence?.

Medardo Rosso, “Henri Rouart” (late 1889–90), bronze, 67 15/16 x 27 15/16 x 19 11/16 in with pedestal, Kunstmuseum Winterthur, donated by the Galerieverein, 1964 (photograph by TeAnne Chartrau © 2016 Alise O’Brien Photography).
Medardo Rosso “Enfant au sein (Child at the Breast)” (late 1889–90), bronze, 19 3/4 x 17 3/4 x 7 7/8 in, Museo Medardo Rosso.

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, installation view (photograph by Jim Corbett © 2016 Alise O’Brien Photography).


Rosso’s “Madame Noblet” (1897), cast in plaster, demonstrates how his work needs to be circumnavigated by the viewer to be appreciated in its fullness. The front of the sculpture, a figure rendered almost unrecognizable in clay, bears likeness to the emotionally charged charcoal gestures in portraits by Kollowitz. Long abrasions are left where the artist used his fingers to carve out big pieces of clay from the woman’s face. The form is even more voluptuously material from behind, where the figure of Madame Noblet has all but disappeared. The immediacy with which Rosso stacked blocks of clay to wrestle out an image is preserved in the cast. He was violently, unapologetically experimental, and the result is work that requires patience to fully appreciate.

Medardo Rosso, “Madame Noblet” (c. 1897–98), 
plaster, 25 1/2 x 20 3/4 x 18 in, Museo Medardo Rosso

The show’s title is didactic and self-evident, but it’s true that Rosso was obsessed with light and experimentation. The drawings and photos on view, many of which have never been exhibited before, offer glimpses into the artist’s vision for his works, which were created to be exhibited under obsessively strict lighting conditions. In his studio, Rosso cast and recast, exhibiting wax forms from lost-wax casts — what is normally “lost” in the process — as final works, purposefully creating unfinished edges and imperfections in bronze and plaster. He photographed or sketched the works over and over with different light, sometimes even photographing his own drawings and reprinting them with different papers and cropping.

Medardo Rosso, “Une conversation (A Conversation)” (1892–99), plaster, 13 3/4 x 26 1/4 x 16 in, Museo Medardo Rosso.

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, installation view (photograph by TeAnne Chartrau © 2016 Alise O’Brien Photography).

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, 
installation view (© 2016 Alise O’Brien Photography)


These and many other secrets are revealed by Sharon Hecker and Tamara H. Schenkenberg’s curating, which deserves recognition for its restraint and precision. Museology tends to be an underappreciated art, because when exhibition design is at its finest, it goes unnoticed: The show opens up to the viewer and takes them by the hand, keeping them unaware that they’re being led. Here, the combination of Rosso’s humble sculptures — which demand a wide radius despite their subtle scale — Ando’s grand architecture, and Hecker and Schenkenberg’s curatorial vision made me want to dance around the museum, trying to see each piece from every possible angle.

The Pulitzer’s pitch-perfect galleries are a regional treasure, providing a strong argument for major exhibition spaces outside of crowded metropolises where space is expensive and galleries are often overhung as a result. When over-curating reigns supreme, both the artworks and the architecture can suffer catastrophically from a “the more the merrier” approach. Getting out of the city and discovering an exhibition space like the Pulitzer presenting such an outstanding show — and truly giving it room to breathe — is exciting for the possibilities of world-class institutions off the beaten path.

Medardo Rosso, “Ecce puer (Behold the Child)” (1906), bronze with plaster investment, 17 1/4 x 14 1/4 x 13 inches, private collection (photograph by Robert Pettus).

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, installation view (photograph by Jim Corbett © 2016 Alise O’Brien Photography)/


Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form continues at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard) until May 13.







Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 
A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.

Vamos compartilhar.

Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing.











--br via tradutor do google
Uma grande exposição refaz a influência do escultor italiano Medardo Rosso.

Pares como Auguste Rodin podem ter ofuscado Rosso, mas o tempo o vindicou como um contribuinte decisivo para o nascimento do Modernismo.

Medardo Rosso, Enfant malade (1893-95), bronze, 10 x 5 3/4 x 6 1/2 polegadas, Galleria d'Arte Moderna, Milano (todas as imagens cedidas pela Pulitzer Arts Foundation)

ST. LOUIS - Um extenso estudo do pouco conhecido bastidor italiano Medardo Rosso, experimentos em luz e forma, agora em exibição na Fundação de Artes Pulitzer em St. Louis, faz o importante trabalho de resgatar a especificidade da história . Eu me apaixonei por cada uma das esculturas de Rosso individualmente, assim como a maneira pela qual a arquitetura de Tadao Ando segurou as formas difíceis levemente em seus pedestais, dando cada trabalho mais do que bastante espaço para contar sua história. As esculturas de Rosso correm toda a gama de sensações, do mal para o angélico, ao mesmo tempo em que mantêm uma desconfortável abstração de chiaroscuro. Pares como Auguste Rodin podem ter ofuscado Rosso, mas o tempo o vindicou como um contribuinte decisivo para o nascimento do Modernismo.


Medardo Rosso: Experiências em Luz e Forma, vista de instalação (fotografia de Jim Corbett © 2016 Alise O'Brien Photography)


Rosso cai no estereótipo do "artista de um artista". Especialistas em sua obra supõem que ele não era apenas influente na vanguarda parisiense durante o surgimento do Modernismo, mas também teve um impacto produtivo em artistas como Pablo Picasso, Constantin Brancusi e Henri Matisse. As elegantes formas escultóricas de Brancusi ecoam obras famosas de Rosso, como "Enfant Malade" (1893-95) e "Madame X" (1896). Os gestos e texturas de Matisse e Picasso com pintura a óleo espelham as superfícies das bordas ásperas de Rosso.

Antes de uma exposição extensa no Centro de Arte Moderna Italiana em 2014, Rosso não tinha sido apresentado em um grande show dos EUA em mais de 50 anos, desde o seu show de 1963 no Museu de Arte Moderna de Nova York. Enquanto isso, "La Muse Endormie" de Brancusi (1913) está agendada para leilão na Christie's por um valor estimado de US $ 20 a US $ 30 milhões em poucas semanas. Uma vez que a conexão é feita, é impossível não ver a escultura de Rosso da criança doente no busto de Brancusi com os mesmos traços angulosos, magros, a musa amorosamente rendida de Brancusi refletindo o rosto oblongo suave do jovem doente. Percorrendo as galerias do Pulitzer, fiquei pensando nas texturas dos retratos de carvão vegetal de Käthe Kollwitz e em xilogravuras de sofrimento cotidiano abstraído. Quão abrangente era a influência desse herói desconhecido?


Medardo Rosso, "Henri Rouart" (final de 1889-90), bronze, 67 15/16 x 27 15/16 x 19 11/16 com pedestal, Kunstmuseum Winterthur, doado pela Galerieverein, 1964 (fotografia de TeAnne Chartrau © 2016 Alise O'Brien Fotografia)

Medardo Rosso "Enfant au sein" (final 1889-90), bronze, 19 3/4 x 17 3/4 x 7 7/8 in, Museu Medardo Rosso

Medardo Rosso: Experiências em Luz e Forma, vista de instalação (fotografia de Jim Corbett © 2016 Alise O'Brien Photography)

"Madame Noblet" de Rosso (1897), moldada em gesso, demonstra como seu trabalho precisa ser circumnavigado pelo espectador para ser apreciado em sua plenitude. A frente da escultura, figura quase irreconhecível em barro, tem semelhança com os gestos de carvão carregados emocionalmente em retratos de Kollowitz. As abrasões longas são deixadas onde o artista usou seus dedos para cinzelar para fora grandes pedaços de argila do rosto da mulher. A forma é ainda mais voluptuosamente material por trás, onde a figura de Madame Noblet quase desapareceu. O imediatismo com que Rosso empilhou blocos de argila para lutar para fora uma imagem é preservado no elenco. Ele foi violentamente, sem remorso experimental, eo resultado é um trabalho que requer paciência para apreciar plenamente.


Medardo Rosso, "Madame Noblet" (1897-98), gesso, 25 1/2 x 20 3/4 x 18 in, Museu Medardo Rosso

O título do show é didático e auto-evidente, mas é verdade que Rosso estava obcecado com a luz e a experimentação. Os desenhos e fotos em exibição, muitos dos quais nunca foram exibidos antes, oferecem vislumbres na visão do artista para suas obras, que foram criados para ser exibido sob condições de obsessiva rigorosa iluminação. Em seu estúdio, Rosso lançou e reformulou, exibindo formas de cera de cera perdida - o que normalmente é "perdido" no processo - como obras finais, criando propositalmente bordas inacabadas e imperfeições em bronze e gesso. Ele fotografava ou esboçava os trabalhos uma e outra vez com luz diferente, às vezes até fotografando seus próprios desenhos e reimprimindo-os com papéis e culturas diferentes.


Medardo Rosso, "Uma conversação" (1892-1899), gesso, 13 3/4 x 26 1/4 x 16 in, Museu Medardo Rosso

Medardo Rosso: Experiências em Luz e Forma, visão de instalação (fotografia de TeAnne Chartrau © 2016 Alise O'Brien Photography)



Estes e muitos outros segredos são revelados por Sharon Hecker e Tamara H. Schenkenberg de curadoria, que merece reconhecimento por sua contenção e precisão. A museologia tende a ser uma arte subestimada, porque quando o design da exposição está no seu melhor, passa despercebido: o show se abre para o espectador e os toma pela mão, mantendo-os sem saber que eles estão sendo conduzidos. Aqui, a combinação das esculturas humildes de Rosso - que exigem um grande raio apesar da sua escala sutil - a arquitectura grandiosa de Ando ea visão curatorial de Hecker e Schenkenberg me fizeram querer dançar ao redor do museu, tentando ver cada peça de todos os ângulos possíveis.

As galerias perfeitas do Pulitzer são um tesouro regional, proporcionando um forte argumento para grandes espaços de exposição fora das metrópoles lotadas onde o espaço é caro e as galerias são muitas vezes superadas como resultado. Quando over-curating reina supremo, tanto as obras de arte ea arquitetura pode sofrer catastróficamente de uma abordagem "o mais o melhor". Sair da cidade e descobrir um espaço de exposição como o Pulitzer apresentando um espetáculo tão notável - e realmente dar-lhe espaço para respirar - é emocionante para as possibilidades de instituições de classe mundial fora do caminho batido.

Medardo Rosso, "Ecce puer (Behold a Criança)" (1906), bronze com investimento em gesso, 17 1/4 x 14 1/4 x 13 polegadas, coleção privada (fotografia de Robert Pettus)

Medardo Rosso: Experiências em Luz e Forma, vista de instalação (fotografia de Jim Corbett © 2016 Alise O'Brien Photography)


Nenhum comentário:

Postar um comentário