Google+ Followers

terça-feira, 27 de junho de 2017

Stunning 4th century mosaic floor unearthed in Cyprus illustrates scenes of ancient Roman chariot races in the hippodro. --- O deslumbrante piso de mosaico do século 4 descoberto em Chipre ilustra cenas de antigas corridas de carros romanos no hipódromo.

Mosaic floor is 36 feet long and 13 feet wide and was discovered just 19 miles from the capital Nicosia


Experts believe it once belonged to a nobleman and wealthy person while Cyprus was under Roman rule

Four charioteers being drawn by four horses are believed to represent factions of ancient Rome

Farmer first discovered a piece of the floor in 1938, but digging did not start decades later

Archaeologists have uncovered a 36-foot mosaic floor depicting scenes of ancient chariot races in the Roman hippodrome.

Dating back to the 4th century, this magnificent artifact was discovered in the Akaki village outside the capital Nicosia, making it the only one of its kind in Cyprus and one of seven in the world.

Not only is this mosaic incredibly detailed, but it illustrates complete race scenes for four charioteers, each being drawn by a team of four horses.

Experts believe this is a representation of the different factions that competed in ancient Rome.



A 36-foot mosaic floor depicting scenes of ancient chariot races in the hippodrome has been uncovered. Dating back to the 4th century, this magnificent artifact was discovered in the Akaki village outside the capital Nicosia, making it the only one of its kind in Cyprus and one of only a handful in the world



'The hippodrome was very important in ancient Roman times, it was the place where the emperor appeared to his people and projected his power,' said Fryni Hadjichristofi, a Cyprus Antiquities Department archaeologist.

Derived from the Greek words hippos ('horse') and dromos ('course'), the hippodrome was an open-air stadium, used for chariot and horse racing, which was a common Grecian activity during the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine eras.


The team believes this stunning piece was once part of a villa owned by a wealthy individual or nobleman while Cyprus was under Roman rule.

Since it was found just 19 miles west of the capital Nicosia, researchers also believe this finding will shed light on the ancient past of the island's interior.

The excavation crew is still working to uncover the entire floor, but the area that is visible measures 36 feet long and 13 feet wide. The team believes this stunning piece was once part of a villa owned by a wealthy individual or nobleman while Cyprus was under Roman rule


'The hippodrome was very important in ancient Roman times, it was the place where the emperor appeared to his people and projected his power,' said Fryni Hadjichristofi, a Cyprus Antiquities Department archaeologist whose shadow is shown in the image. Derived from the Greek words hippos ('horse') and dromos ('course'), the hippodrome was an open-air stadium, used for chariot and horse racing

The mosaic displays scenes from a chariot race, with one charioteer standing as he is being pulled by four horses – in total it shows four different races.

Near each of the four charioteers are inscriptions, which is believed to be their names and the name of one of the horses.

Archaeologists believe this representation is the four factions that would compete in chariot races while ancient Rome reigned. 

Three cones can be seen along the circular arena, each topped with egg-shaped objects, and three columns seen in the distance hold up dolphin figures with what appears like water flowing from them.



This mosaic floor is said to be a rare and unique find, due to how well-preserved and detailed it is.  Experts believe it depicts the four factions that once competed in chariot races during ancient Rome, which was also a common activity among the Greeks during this time



This ancient work of art displays scenes from a chariot race, with one charioteer standing as he is being pulled by four horse – in total it shows four different races. Near each of the four charioteers are inscriptions, which is believed to be their names and the name of one of the horses

On another part of the mosaic is one man on horseback and two others that are standing - one is holding a whip and the other a jug of water.

'It is an extremely important finding, because of the technique and because of the theme,' the director of the Department of Antiquities Marina Ieronymidou said during a press conference in front of the mosaic this week. 

'It is unique in Cyprus since the presence of this mosaic floor in a remote inland area provides important new information on that period in Cyprus and adds to our knowledge of the use of mosaic floors on the island.'

The typical hippodrome was carved into a hillside and the material pulled from the ground was packed along the edges to construct an embankment for seats.



Three cones can be seen along the circular arena, which are topped with egg-shaped objects and three columns are seen in the distance that are holding up dolphin figures with what appears like what is flowing from. On another part of the mosaic is one man on horseback and two others that are standing - one is holding a whip and the other a jug of water

WHAT DID ARCHAEOLOGISTS UNEARTH IN CYPRUS?
Archaeologist uncovered a 36-foot long mosaic floor in the Akaki village outside the capital Nicosia.

This masterpiece depicts  complete scenes with four chariots, each with a team of four horses, that are competing in the hippodrome – a representation of the different factions that competed in ancient Rome.

One charioteer can be seen standing as he is being pulled by four horse – in total it shows four different races.



The team believes this stunning piece may have once been part of a villa owned by a wealthy individual or nobleman while Cyprus was under Roman rule. Since it was found just 19 miles west of the capital Nicosia, researchers also believe this finding will shed light on the ancient past of the island's interior
Under each of the four charioteers are inscriptions, which is believed to be their names and the name of one of the horses.

There are three cones along the circular arena that are topped with an egg-shaped object and three columns are topped with a dolphin figure with what appears like what is flowing from.

On another part of the mosaic is one man on horseback and two others that are standing - one is holding a whip and the other a jug of water.

The team believes this stunning piece may have once been part of a villa owned by a wealthy individual or nobleman while Cyprus was under Roman rule. 
Since it was found just 19 miles west of the capital Nicosia, researchers also believe this finding will shed light on the ancient past of the islands interior, as little is known. 


Its shape was oblong, with one end semicircular and the other squared – similar to a 'U', but with a closed top.

A low wall, called a spina, was constructed through the middle and ran almost from one end of the stadium to the other in order to divide the course.

This wall was decorated with monuments and sculptures that were shifted around to inform spectators of the laps completed during the race.

Since it could hold as many 10 chariot races at once, the course was sometimes as wide as 400 feet wide and 600 to 700 feet long.

This scene was depicted in the 1959 American film Ben Hur, which is famous for its nine-minute chariot race in a hippodrome.

Ben Hur, played by Charlton Heston, races around the course with a team of four horses as thousands of spectators cheer him on from the embankment.




A famous movie in the 1959 file Ben Hur was the nine minute chariot race around a hippodrome. Ben Hur, played by Charlton Heston, is racing with a team of four horses



A small piece of decorated floor was first discovered by a farmer back in 1939, but full-fledged digging wasn't started until decades later due to work on other sites, explained researchers



Experts say this mosaic floor is a unique find because of the technique and theme used to construct it. They hope this find provides new information on this period in Cyprus and how people used mosaic floors on the island +12

Experts say this mosaic floor is a unique find because of the technique and theme used to construct it. They hope this find provides new information on this period in Cyprus and how people used mosaic floors on the island 

Researchers found that most of the important ancient finds on the island, like this well-preserved mosaic, are usually found along the coast, because this is where cities and town flourished in antiquity.

A small piece of decorated floor was first discovered by a farmer back in 1939, but full-fledged digging wasn't started until decades due to work on other sites, explained Hadjichristofi.

Cyprus was once a a wealthy island in antiquity, as it was known for producing copper, timber from its then-ample forests, as well as pottery, many examples of which have been found in neighboring countries, said Hadjichristofi.
'We know that Cyprus was once wealthy, the latest discoveries confirm this,' she said. 



The typical hippodrome was carved into a hillside and the material pulled from the ground was packed along the edges to construct an embankment for seats. Its shape was oblong, with one end semicircular and the other squared – similar to a ‘U’, but with a closed top. Pictured are the ruins of a hippodrome in Aphrodisias, Turkey +12

The typical hippodrome was carved into a hillside and the material pulled from the ground was packed along the edges to construct an embankment for seats. Its shape was oblong, with one end semicircular and the other squared – similar to a 'U', but with a closed top. Pictured are the ruins of a hippodrome in Aphrodisias, Turkey



Researchers found that most of the important ancient finds on the island, like this well-preserved mosaic, are usually found along the coast because this is where cities and town flourished in antiquity.  Cyprus was once a a wealthy island in antiquity, as it was known for producing copper, timber from its then-ample forests, as well as pottery, many examples of which have been found in neighboring countries +12


Researchers found that most of the important ancient finds on the island, like this well-preserved mosaic, are usually found along the coast because this is where cities and town flourished in antiquity.  Cyprus was once a a wealthy island in antiquity, as it was known for producing copper, timber from its then-ample forests, as well as pottery, many examples of which have been found in neighboring countries





fonte: @edisonmariotti #edisonmariotti

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3732887/Rare-4th-century-mosaic-chariot-race-Cyprus.html

Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 
A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.

Vamos compartilhar.

Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing.






--br via tradutor do google
O deslumbrante piso de mosaico do século 4 descoberto em Chipre ilustra cenas de antigas corridas de carros romanos no hipódromo.

O piso mosaico tem 36 pés de comprimento e 13 metros de largura e foi descoberto a apenas 19 milhas da capital de Nicosia

Os especialistas acreditam que pertencia a um nobre e uma pessoa rica enquanto Chipre estava sob o domínio romano

Espera-se que quatro cavaleiros sejam desenhados por quatro cavalos para representar facções da Roma antiga

O agricultor primeiro descobriu um pedaço do chão em 1938, mas cavar não começou décadas depois

Arqueólogos descobriram um piso de mosaico de 36 pés que retratava cenas de raças de carruagens antigas no hipódromo romano.

Datada do século 4, este magnífico artefato foi descoberto na aldeia de Akaki, fora da capital, em Nicósia, tornando-se o único desse tipo em Chipre e um dos sete no mundo.

Não só este mosaico é incrivelmente detalhado, mas ilustra cenas completas de corridas para quatro carros, sendo cada um desenhado por uma equipe de quatro cavalos.

Os especialistas acreditam que esta é uma representação das diferentes facções que competiram na Roma antiga.

Um chão de mosaico de 36 pés que descreve cenas de antigas corridas de carros no hipódromo foi descoberto. Datada do século IV, este magnífico artefato foi descoberto na aldeia de Akaki, fora da capital, Nicosia, tornando-se o único desse tipo em Chipre e um dos poucos do mundo +12

Um chão de mosaico de 36 pés que descreve cenas de antigas corridas de carros no hipódromo foi descoberto. Datada do século 4, este magnífico artefato foi descoberto na aldeia de Akaki, fora da capital, em Nicosia, tornando-se o único desse tipo em Chipre e um dos poucos do mundo

"O hipódromo era muito importante na época romana antiga, era o lugar onde o imperador apareceu ao seu povo e projetou seu poder", disse Fryni Hadjichristofi, um arqueólogo do Departamento de Antiguidades de Chipre.

Derivado das palavras gregas hipopótamos ("cavalo") e dromos ("curso"), o hipódromo era um estádio ao ar livre, usado para carruagens e corridas de cavalos, que era uma atividade grega comum durante as eras helenísticas, romanas e bizantinas.

A equipe de escavação ainda está trabalhando para descobrir todo o piso, mas a área visível mede 36 pés de comprimento e 13 metros de largura.

A equipe acredita que essa peça deslumbrante foi uma vez parte de uma vila possuída por um homem rico ou nobre, enquanto Chipre estava sob o domínio romano.

Uma vez que foi encontrado apenas 19 milhas a oeste da capital de Nicósia, os pesquisadores também acreditam que esta descoberta irá esclarecer o antigo passado do interior da ilha.

A equipe de escavação ainda está trabalhando para descobrir todo o piso, mas a área visível mede 36 pés de comprimento e 13 metros de largura. A equipe acredita que essa peça deslumbrante foi uma vez parte de uma vila possuída por um homem rico ou nobre, enquanto Chipre estava sob o domínio romano +12

A equipe de escavação ainda está trabalhando para descobrir todo o piso, mas a área visível mede 36 pés de comprimento e 13 metros de largura. A equipe acredita que essa peça deslumbrante foi uma vez parte de uma vila possuída por um indivíduo rico ou nobre, enquanto Chipre estava sob o domínio romano

"O hipódromo era muito importante na época romana antiga, era o lugar onde o imperador apareceu ao seu povo e projetou seu poder", disse Fryni Hadjichristofi, um arqueólogo do Departamento de Antiguidades de Chipre, cuja sombra é mostrada na imagem. Derivado das palavras gregas hipopótamos ('cavalo') e dromos ('curso'), o hipódromo era um estádio ao ar livre, usado para carruagens e corridas de cavalos +12

"O hipódromo era muito importante na época romana antiga, era o lugar onde o imperador apareceu ao seu povo e projetou seu poder", disse Fryni Hadjichristofi, um arqueólogo do Departamento de Antiguidades de Chipre, cuja sombra é mostrada na imagem. Derivado das palavras gregas hipopótamos ('cavalo') e dromos ('curso'), o hipódromo era um estádio ao ar livre, usado para carruagens e corridas de cavalos

O mosaico exibe cenas de uma corrida de carruagens, com um carroiro parado enquanto ele está sendo puxado por quatro cavalos - no total mostra quatro corridas diferentes.

Perto de cada um dos quatro carros são inscrições, que se acredita serem seus nomes e o nome de um dos cavalos.

Os arqueólogos acreditam que esta representação é as quatro facções que competiriam em corridas de carros enquanto a Roma antiga reinava.

Três cones podem ser vistos ao longo da arena circular, cada um coberto com objetos em forma de ovo, e três colunas vistas à distância sustentam figuras de golfinhos com o que aparece como água que flui de elas.

Este piso de mosaico é considerado um achado raro e único, devido a quão bem preservado e detalhado é. Os especialistas acreditam que retrata as quatro facções que uma vez competiram em corridas de carros durante a Roma antiga, que também era uma atividade comum entre os gregos durante esse período

Esta antiga obra de arte exibe cenas de uma corrida de carros, com um carrocero parado enquanto ele está sendo puxado por quatro cavalos - no total mostra quatro raças diferentes. Cerca de cada um dos quatro carros são inscrições, que se acredita serem seus nomes e o nome de um dos cavalos
Em outra parte do mosaico há um homem a cavalo e outros dois que estão em pé - um está segurando um chicote e outro um jarro de água.
"É uma descoberta extremamente importante, por causa da técnica e por causa do tema", disse o diretor do Departamento de Antiguidades, Marina Ieronymidou, durante uma conferência de imprensa em frente ao mosaico desta semana.
"É único em Chipre, uma vez que a presença deste piso de mosaico em uma área interior remota fornece novas informações importantes sobre esse período em Chipre e contribui para o nosso conhecimento do uso de pisos de mosaico na ilha".
O hipódromo típico foi esculpido em uma encosta e o material puxado do chão foi embalado ao longo das bordas para construir um aterro para assentos.

Três contos podem ser vistos ao longo da arena circular, que são cobertos com objetos em forma de ovo e três colunas são vistas na distância que mantêm figuras de golfinhos com o que parece ser o que está fluindo. Em outra parte do mosaico é um homem a cavalo e outros dois que estão em pé - um está segurando um chicote e outro um jarro de água

O QUE ARQUERAOLOGIA DETERMINOU EM CHIPRE?
Arqueólogo descobriu um piso de mosaico de 36 pés de comprimento na vila de Akaki, fora da capital, Nicosia.
Esta obra-prima retrata cenas completas com quatro carros, cada um com uma equipe de quatro cavalos, que estão competindo no hipódromo - uma representação das diferentes facções que competiram na Roma antiga.
Um carroiro pode ser visto parado enquanto ele está sendo puxado por quatro cavalos - no total mostra quatro raças diferentes.


A equipe acredita que essa peça deslumbrante pode ter sido parte de uma vila de propriedade de um indivíduo rico ou nobre, enquanto Chipre estava sob o domínio romano. Uma vez que foi encontrado apenas 19 milhas a oeste da capital Nicosia, os pesquisadores também acreditam que esta descoberta irá esclarecer o antigo passado do interior da ilha
Sob cada um dos quatro carros são inscrições, que se acredita serem seus nomes e o nome de um dos cavalos.
Há três cones ao longo da arena circular que são cobertos com um objeto em forma de ovo e três colunas são cobertas com uma figura de golfinhos com o que parece ser o que está fluindo.
Em outra parte do mosaico há um homem a cavalo e outros dois que estão em pé - um está segurando um chicote e outro um jarro de água.
A equipe acredita que essa peça deslumbrante pode ter sido parte de uma vila de propriedade de um indivíduo rico ou nobre, enquanto Chipre estava sob o domínio romano.
Uma vez que foi encontrado a apenas 19 milhas a oeste da Nicosia, os pesquisadores também acreditam que essa descoberta dará luz sobre o antigo passado do interior das ilhas, como pouco se sabe.


Sua forma era oblonga, com uma extremidade semicircular e a outra quadrada - semelhante a um 'U', mas com um topo fechado.
Uma parede baixa, chamada de espinha, foi construída pelo meio e correu quase de um lado do outro para dividir o percurso.
Este muro foi decorado com monumentos e esculturas que foram deslocados para informar os espectadores das voltas finalizadas durante a corrida.
Uma vez que poderia conter tantas corridas de 10 carruagens ao mesmo tempo, o curso era às vezes tão grande quanto 400 pés de largura e 600 a 700 pés de comprimento.
Esta cena foi retratada no filme americano Ben Hur de 1959, que é famoso por sua corrida de carros de nove minutos em um hipódromo.
Ben Hur, interpretado por Charlton Heston, corre ao redor do curso com uma equipe de quatro cavalos enquanto milhares de espectadores o animam do aterro.


Um filme famoso no arquivo de 1959, Ben Hur, foi a corrida de carros de nove minutos em torno de um hipódromo. Ben Hur, interpretado por Charlton Heston, está correndo com uma equipe de quatro cavalos

Um pequeno pedaço de piso decorado foi descoberto pela primeira vez por um fazendeiro em 1939, mas a descoberta de pleno direito não foi iniciada até décadas depois devido ao trabalho em outros sites, explicaram os pesquisadores
Especialistas dizem que este piso de mosaico é um achado único por causa da técnica e do tema usado para construí-lo. Eles esperam que esta pesquisa forneça novas informações sobre esse período em Chipre e como as pessoas usaram pisos de mosaico na ilha +12
Especialistas dizem que este piso de mosaico é um achado único por causa da técnica e do tema usado para construí-lo. Eles esperam que este encontrar forneça novas informações sobre esse período em Chipre e como as pessoas usaram pisos de mosaico na ilha
Os pesquisadores descobriram que a maioria dos importantes achados antigos na ilha, como este mosaico bem preservado, geralmente são encontrados ao longo da costa, porque é aqui que as cidades e a cidade floresceram na antiguidade.

Um pequeno pedaço de piso decorado foi descoberto pela primeira vez por um fazendeiro em 1939, mas a exploração de pleno direito não foi iniciada até décadas, devido ao trabalho em outros sites, explicou Hadjichristofi.

Chipre era uma vez uma ilha rica na antiguidade, como era conhecida por produzir cobre, madeira de suas então amplas florestas, bem como cerâmica, muitos exemplos dos quais foram encontrados em países vizinhos, disse Hadjichristofi.

"Nós sabemos que Chipre já foi rica, as últimas descobertas confirmam isso", disse ela.

O hipódromo típico foi esculpido em uma encosta e o material puxado do chão foi embalado ao longo das bordas para construir um aterro para assentos. Sua forma era oblonga, com uma extremidade semicircular e a outra quadrada - semelhante a um 'U', mas com um topo fechado. Representados são as ruínas de um hipódromo em Afrodisias, Turquia +12

O hipódromo típico foi esculpido em uma encosta e o material puxado do chão foi embalado ao longo das bordas para construir um aterro para assentos. Sua forma era oblonga, com uma extremidade semicircular e a outra quadrada - semelhante a um 'U', mas com um topo fechado. As ruínas de um hipódromo em Aphrodisias, Turquia

Os pesquisadores descobriram que a maioria dos importantes achados antigos na ilha, como esse mosaico bem preservado, geralmente são encontrados ao longo da costa, porque é aqui que as cidades e a cidade floresceram na antiguidade. Chipre era uma vez uma ilha rica na antiguidade, como era conhecida por produzir cobre, madeira de suas então amplas florestas, bem como cerâmica, muitos exemplos dos quais foram encontrados em países vizinhos +12


Os pesquisadores descobriram que a maioria dos importantes achados antigos na ilha, como esse mosaico bem preservado, geralmente são encontrados ao longo da costa, porque é aqui que as cidades e a cidade floresceram na antiguidade. Chipre era uma vez uma ilha rica na antiguidade, como era conhecida por produzir cobre, madeira de suas florestas então amplas, bem como cerâmica, muitos exemplos dos quais foram encontrados em países vizinhos

Nenhum comentário:

Postar um comentário