Google+ Followers

quarta-feira, 17 de maio de 2017

Museums, Can We Stop Letting Objects Control The Narrative? --- Museus, podemos parar de deixar os objetos controlar a narrativa?

It’s rare that you can remember the exact moment when your thinking changes. But I can pinpoint the project that altered my perspective about the role of objects in museums. In 2013 I was designing a new school tour for the Atlanta History Center. We wanted to replace the old Black History tour (which had content that was mile-wide-inch-deep) with something more dynamic and relevant. Research told us there was a big demand for programming around the Civil Rights Era. But the museum had only one object on display from the movement. How would we build a tour around one object?

The answer: take objects out of the equation. 




In focusing solely on the experience and the story we wanted to tell, we freed ourselves from the constraints of objects that either didn’t exist or didn’t tell the right story. 

Hallelujah! It was like a weight had been lifted. Suddenly anything was possible. Have you ever been compelled to tell stories that are important to the human species, but that your collections don’t support? Maybe it’s time to think about using your collections as a sideshow instead of the main event.




Reinventing school tours at the Atlanta History Center was a part of grant-funded initiative called “Meet the Past.” It called for theatre-driven “immersive” learning in all educational programming. So we had a strong drive to make the tour completely experiential. I think that’s what gave our brains permission to think outside the box. I started to realize that I could create worlds where they didn’t exist if I thought creatively. At first it was daunting, but ultimately freeing. The circumstance reminded me of my teaching days when an administrator said, “You’re teaching anthropology this semester. There’s no textbook or curriculum. Good luck.” This led to a total freak out . . . followed by the best semester I ever had. 

"Fight For Your Rights" would be the museum’s first field trip program that excluded object-based learning completely. For a simulation of the 1961 Freedom Rides we created a bus façade out of plywood. We held sit-ins in the museum’s café. And we appropriated part of a folk art exhibit for a church rally on voter registration. We used photographs to anchor the experiences in history, but no objects. The program, called “Fight For Your Rights” was an immediate success. Student visitation increased by more than 50%, compared with the old tour. [for more pics & info see Portfolio page]

But didn’t teachers complain about a school tour without any real artifacts? No, quite the opposite. School groups come for a unique experience that they can’t get in the classroom and a more visceral experience with academic content. I don’t think they care how they get it, whether it’s by seeing objects or having experiences. The feedback we got after launching the new tour indicated that kids gained a deep understanding of using non-violent action to affect change – and about the power of being an ordinary person protesting an unjust system. I don’t know if that can be accomplished in the same way with objects. 

Equally important, social justice topics don't always come with a nice set of objects to tell the story. Sometimes histories of the oppressed and marginalized never get collected by museums - especially in the past. But this doesn't have to be a deterrent if we make objects less central to our educational missions (which includes the physical galleries). 


"Fight For Your Rights" school tour, Atlanta History Center. Shown here: Freedom Riders simulation using plywood bus.

Don’t get me wrong, I believe there is real power in objects. “They can be almost spiritual links to the past,”

says my exhibit designer friend Isabella Bruno (formerly of the 9/11 Museum, now a fellow freelancer). Would I have loved to show students the melted steering wheel of the Greyhound bus that carried Freedom Riders? Absolutely. After experiencing a simulation, seeing the authentic steering wheel charred with the marks of real danger could have had a profound impact on the students. And in fact, I’m convinced that the experience would have given the steering wheel more power than just displaying it in a case with text. 


Anniston, Alabama 1961. Freedom Riders bus is bombed by anti-civil rights protesters. 


But we didn’t have this object. In fact I don’t even know if it has been preserved. Have you ever come across this frustration? You want an object to help tell a particular story, but that object hasn’t been preserved. Or it isn’t available. Hypothetically, instead of the charred steering wheel, maybe you settle for a wallet belonging to a later Freedom Rider who wasn’t on the bombed bus. Does the wallet have the same emotional impact? Maybe not, but it’s what you have. You settle for it because it’s real.

But does real = impact? 

Another thought from Isabella Bruno: “In our increasingly digital world I think people are going to be more obsessed with authenticity . . . with the analog . . . with things they can see in real life or hold in their hands.” True. True. But isn’t there a way to communicate authenticity without being hamstrung or limited by collections. In talking it through we wondered if the mere fact that museums do collect objects and engage in scholarship around those objects gives them the credibility to “inject” authenticity into museum experiences – even when no objects are used. 

Let’s not throw away our collections in favor of experiences. But let’s NOT let them control the narrative either. Imagine the power of museum experiences driven by inspiring ideas and questions instead of objects. If objects can support a big idea or question, then let’s include them. If not, let’s not be confined by their absence.

In a popular 2011 History News article, “Do History Museums Still Need Objects?” Rainey Tisdale wrote:


“Museums now rely on all sort of interpretive tools to tell their stories

– we need everything in the arsenal to do our job well. . .” 

Yes, everything! Digital media. Immersive spaces. Interactives. Dialogues with docents. Theatre. Maker spaces. Crafting stations. Wall text. Wonderous visuals. Lighting design. Sound design. Games. Simulations. And yes, objects. There are so many tools that can be used to investigate, interrogate, and interpret our existence. And as museums accept their role as institutions that serve the interests of their communities, rather than as mere storage facilities, mastery of more tools becomes imperative. We don't always have to use the hammer. We can choose the tools that give us the freedom to make a lasting impact and become more relevant to the communities we serve. 




Rainey and fellow envelope pushers Elee Wood and Trevor Jones have some ground-breaking ideas about collecting (and not collecting) objects that they will be unleashing on the world in a forthcoming book entitled Active Collections (Coming by end of 2017 but until then check out their website). They (and other authors) call into question the justifications museums use for keeping vast stockpiles of objects that aren’t pulling their weight. They translate, into museum practice, the already pervasive trends to downsize and simplify our consumer-driven material world. I full-heartedly agree with their manifesto. And within this dialogue, I think there is space to talk about using objects in a supporting role, if at all.


Illustration: active collections.org

Would museums be forced to offer more meaningful and interactive experiences if they didn’t have a collection to display? Consider science centers. They task themselves with illustrating concepts – gravity, climate change, how sound travels, etc. They’re less concerned with the remaining evidence of events, people or culture. Phenomenon-based science museums are inherently more experiential because they have to be. They illustrate processes – verbs – that can’t readily be illustrated by static artifacts in cases. 

The Chicago Museum of Science and Industry’s “You! The Experience” is a great example. A big over-arching question helps frame the exhibition: how can I improve my well-being? How could an exhibition be more relevant? It’s about me! And it shows me how I work in a way that involves me – no objects required.

For example, a game called “Mindball” teaches visitors how to control their brainwaves and use mindful relaxation. The goal is to “out relax” your opponent. I have not seen “You! The Experience,” but it’s on my bucket list. 




Does a science museum’s lack of collections and focus on abstract processes give it freedom to explore more interpretive tools? Maybe history museums should focus on processes and abstract concepts too. For example, I would love to see a history museum exhibition that helps visitors explore the limits of personal freedom. When should freedom take a back seat to safety? When is it ok for the government to regulate my freedom? These are big picture questions, but they could be explored through experiential learning using historical context. With Trump in office, I've been wondering about the limits of personal freedom more than ever before. We need museums to tackle topics like this. Objects can certainly add potency to the punchline, but I’m not sure they can actually help me feel the “process” of freedom - or the lack of it. 


The Cooper-Hewitt has gotten lots of attention for it’s nifty digital pens, but for me, that wasn’t the most compelling part of this museum.

Not an exhibit, but more of creative strategy incubator, The Process Lab does a spectacular job of scaffolding an experience to empower, not overwhelm, its users. How can good design solve real-life problems and make a more equitable world? Well, try the process yourself. I did, and I managed to leave with a concrete strategy to connect people of different backgrounds in my neighborhood with others who care about the same things.

Start with what you value. I chose “Connectivity.” Then choose a question you want to tackle. My question was “How might we encourage people to explore their communities?” Next look at the 36 design tactic cards for ideas. My result –- a sort of diversity speed dating at the grocery store. Hey, maybe it could work?

I love that this activity is so focused on pragmatic solutions to sustainability and social equity issues. Its heart is in the right place and it practices what it preaches –- good design + community engagement leads to impact.

Does a science museum’s lack of collections and focus on abstract processes give it freedom to explore more interpretive tools? Maybe history museums should focus on processes and abstract concepts too. For example, I would love to see a history museum exhibition that helps visitors explore the limits of personal freedom. When should freedom take a back seat to safety? When is it ok for the government to regulate my freedom? These are big picture questions, but they could be explored through experiential learning using historical context. With Trump in office, I've been wondering about the limits of personal freedom more than ever before. We need museums to tackle topics like this. Objects can certainly add potency to the punchline, but I’m not sure they can actually help me feel the “process” of freedom - or the lack of it. 

Here are 3 more stellar museum experiences that do not rely on objects:

1. “Dialogue in the Dark” by Dialogue Social Enterprises (Hamburg, Germany) Visitors are guided by blind guides, in absolute darkness, through simulated environments representing adventures in everyday life. The perspective shift in this experience is profound. As they say, “the blind become sighted and the sighted become blind.” The tagline is “changing the way you see,” which is not a BS marketing motto. This powerful experience really did change my perception of blind people and the everyday world I experience with sight. At the end of the tour, our blind guide sat with us and our group in a dark café and discussed what it’s like to be blind. What people reveal in the dark is refreshingly honest.




I don’t know if this technically qualifies as a museum experience since the tours are offered in rented retail spaces, but this program is both educational and exhilarating. I briefly worked at Premiere Exhibitions in Atlanta (a for-profit company that rented “Dialogue” and also exhibits “Bodies”), so I got to see behind the scenes. All the simulated environments, which I first experienced in the dark, were drearily ordinary when we had to clean them at night. The magic really is in the experience that is created in visitors' imaginations. 

Dialogue in the Dark is mostly conducted in Europe. I’m not sure why more American venues haven’t picked it up. 

2. “Making Marines” by the National Museum of the Marine Corps (Triangle, Virginia)


If you’ve never been to the Marine Museum just south of DC, it’s really a hidden gem full of experiential elements and immersive environments. I’m a pretty extreme pacifist, so I was surprised to find myself there -- and enjoying it. But after developing a small exhibit on veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, I became interested in this place. The “Making Marines” exhibition puts you in role as a wannabe marine and makes transparent the whole process of stripping away your civilian identity and instilling discipline. Do you have what it takes to be a marine? I asked myself this question as I stood in a bootcamp simulator booth while auditory drill instructors yelled in my ears. “Put your heels together! Say something! How many weapons! Look at your weapons!” Confusing and multi-directional stimulus is designed to ready marines for psychologically stressful conditions and to train their brains to focus. After experiencing this and several other challenges, and despite my skepticism of the military industrial complex, I felt a strange call to action –- a summoning of my courage, and a more complex understanding of what it means to be a marine. Impressive. 





The Cooper-Hewitt has gotten lots of attention for it’s nifty digital pens, but for me, that wasn’t the most compelling part of this museum.

Not an exhibit, but more of creative strategy incubator, The Process Lab does a spectacular job of scaffolding an experience to empower, not overwhelm, its users. How can good design solve real-life problems and make a more equitable world? Well, try the process yourself. I did, and I managed to leave with a concrete strategy to connect people of different backgrounds in my neighborhood with others who care about the same things.

Start with what you value. I chose “Connectivity.” Then choose a question you want to tackle. My question was “How might we encourage people to explore their communities?” Next look at the 36 design tactic cards for ideas. My result –- a sort of diversity speed dating at the grocery store. Hey, maybe it could work?









I love that this activity is so focused on pragmatic solutions to sustainability and social equity issues. Its heart is in the right place and it practices what it preaches –- good design + community engagement leads to impact.

The Process Lab was designed to be a companion activity for the exhibition “For the People: Designing a Better America.” I love this exhibition, too. It was full of objects –- design solutions created by very innovative people to make the world a better place. But it was in the Process Lab that I thought “Hey, I could do this.”

Andrea Jones is a consultant specializing in helping museums to create transformative learning experiences. She conducts workshops and designs experiential programs for museums and cultural organizations.

Join Peak Experience Lab on Facebook! 

Tags Objects, Experience, Atlanta History Center, Isabella Bruno, Freedom Rides, Rainey Tisdale, Elee Wood, Trevor Jones, Active Collections, Cooper Hewitt, Dialogue in the Dark, Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, You! The Experience, National Museum of the Marine Corps, Process Lab








Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 
A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.

Vamos compartilhar.


Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing.









--br via tradutor do google
Museus, podemos parar de deixar os objetos controlar a narrativa?

É raro que você possa se lembrar do momento exato em que seu pensamento muda. Mas posso apontar o projeto que alterou minha perspectiva sobre o papel dos objetos nos museus. Em 2013 eu estava projetando uma nova turnê escolar para o Atlanta History Center. Nós quisemos substituir a excursão velha da história preta (que teve o índice que era milha-largura-polegada-profundamente) com algo mais dinâmico e relevante. A pesquisa nos disse que havia uma grande demanda por programação em torno da Era dos Direitos Civis. Mas o museu tinha apenas um objeto em exibição do movimento. Como construiríamos uma excursão em torno de um objeto?

A resposta: tirar objetos da equação.



Ao nos concentrarmos unicamente na experiência e na história que queríamos contar, livramo-nos das restrições de objetos que não existiam ou não contavam a história correta.

Aleluia! Era como se um peso tivesse sido levantado. De repente, tudo era possível. Você já foi obrigado a contar histórias que são importantes para a espécie humana, mas que suas coleções não suportam? Talvez seja hora de pensar em usar suas coleções como um espetáculo em vez do evento principal.

Reinventar os passeios escolares no Atlanta History Center foi uma parte da iniciativa financiada por doações chamada "Conheça o Passado". Ela exigia uma aprendizagem "imersiva" baseada em teatro em toda a programação educacional. Portanto, teve um forte Drive para fazer o passeio completamente experimental. Acho que foi isso que deu a nossa cabeça a permissão para pensar fora da caixa. Eu comecei a perceber que eu poderia criar mundos onde eles não existiam se eu pensava criativamente. No começo era assustador, mas finalmente libertador. A circunstância lembrou-me dos meus dias de ensino quando um administrador disse: "Você está ensinando antropologia neste semestre. Não há livro ou currículo. Boa sorte. "Isso levou a uma surpresa total. . . Seguido pelo melhor semestre que já tive.

"Fight for Your Rights" seria o primeiro programa de viagem de campo do museu que excluía completamente a aprendizagem baseada em objetos. Para uma simulação do 1961 Freedom Rides nós criamos uma fachada de ônibus em madeira compensada. Nós mantivemos sit-ins no café do museu. E nos apropriamos parte de uma exibição de arte popular para uma reunião da igreja sobre o registro de eleitores. Usamos fotografias para ancorar as experiências da história, mas não objetos. O programa, chamado "Fight For Your Rights" foi um sucesso imediato. A visitação dos alunos aumentou em mais de 50%, em comparação com a antiga turnê. 

Mas os professores não se queixaram de uma excursão escolar sem artefatos reais? Não, muito pelo contrário. Os grupos escolares vêm para uma experiência única que não podem entrar na sala de aula e uma experiência mais visceral com conteúdo acadêmico. Eu não acho que eles se preocupam como eles conseguem, seja por ver objetos ou ter experiências. O feedback que recebemos após o lançamento da nova turnê indicou que as crianças adquiriram uma compreensão profunda de usar a ação não-violenta para afetar a mudança - e sobre o poder de ser uma pessoa comum que protesta contra um sistema injusto. Eu não sei se isso pode ser realizado da mesma maneira com objetos.

Igualmente importante, os temas de justiça social nem sempre vêm com um belo conjunto de objetos para contar a história. Às vezes, histórias de oprimidos e marginalizados nunca são coletadas pelos museus - especialmente no passado. Mas isso não tem que ser um impedimento se tornarmos objetos menos centrais para nossas missões educacionais (que inclui as galerias físicas).

Não me interpretem mal, eu acredito que há poder real nos objetos. "Eles podem ser quase espiritual links para o passado",

Diz minha amiga do designer da exposição Isabella Bruno. Eu teria adorado mostrar aos alunos o volante derretido do ônibus Greyhound que levava Freedom Riders? Absolutamente. Depois de experimentar uma simulação, ver o autêntico volante carbonizado com as marcas de perigo real poderia ter tido um profundo impacto sobre os alunos. E na verdade, estou convencido de que a experiência teria dado ao volante mais poder do que apenas exibi-lo em um caso com texto.

Mas não tínhamos esse objetivo. Na verdade, eu nem sei se ele foi preservado. Você já se deparou com essa frustração? Você quer que um objeto ajude a contar uma história específica, mas esse objeto não foi preservado. Ou não está disponível. Hipoteticamente, em vez do volante carbonizado, talvez você se contentar com uma carteira pertencente a um mais tarde Freedom Rider que não estava no ônibus bombardeado. A carteira tem o mesmo impacto emocional? Talvez não, mas é o que você tem. Você se contentar com isso porque é real.

Mas o impacto é real?

Outro pensamento de Isabella Bruno: "Em nosso mundo cada vez mais digital, eu acho que as pessoas vão ficar mais obcecadas com a autenticidade. . . Com o analógico. . . Com coisas que eles podem ver na vida real ou segurar em suas mãos. "Verdade. Verdade. Mas não há uma maneira de comunicar a autenticidade sem ser hamstrung ou limitado por coleções. Ao falar sobre isso, perguntamos se o mero fato de que os museus coletam objetos e se envolvem em estudos ao redor desses objetos lhes dá a credibilidade de "injetar" autenticidade nas experiências do museu - mesmo quando não há objetos usados.

Não vamos jogar fora nossas coleções em favor de experiências. Mas não vamos deixá-los controlar a narrativa quer. Imagine o poder das experiências do museu impulsionadas por idéias e perguntas inspiradoras em vez de objetos. Se os objetos podem suportar uma grande idéia ou pergunta, então vamos incluí-los. Se não, não vamos ser confinados por sua ausência.

Em um artigo popular da notícia da história 2011, "os museus da história necessitam ainda objetos?" Rainey Tisdale escreveu:

"Os museus agora contam com todo tipo de ferramentas interpretativas para contar suas histórias

- precisamos de tudo no arsenal para fazer o nosso trabalho bem. . . "

Sim tudo! Mídia digital. Espaços imersivos. Interativos. Diálogos com docentes. Teatro. Espaços do fabricante. Crafting estações. Texto de parede. Imagens maravilhosas. Design de iluminação. Design de som. Jogos. Simulações. E sim, objetos. Existem tantas ferramentas que podem ser usadas para investigar, interrogar e interpretar nossa existência. E como os museus aceitam seu papel como instituições que servem os interesses de suas comunidades, ao invés de meras instalações de armazenamento, o domínio de mais ferramentas torna-se imperativo. Nem sempre precisamos usar o martelo. Podemos escolher as ferramentas que nos dão a liberdade de fazer um impacto duradouro e se tornarem mais relevantes para as comunidades que servimos.

Rainey e os empurradores do envelope do companheiro Elee Wood e Trevor Jones têm algumas idéias inovadoras sobre a coleta (e não a coleta) de objetos que eles estarão desencadeando no mundo em um próximo livro intitulado Coleções Ativas (Vindo até o final de 2017 mas até então confira Seu site). Eles (e outros autores) questionam as justificações que os museus usam para manter vastos estoques de objetos que não estão puxando seu peso. Eles traduzem, na prática do museu, as tendências já difundidas para reduzir e simplificar nosso mundo material orientado ao consumidor. Concordo inteiramente com seu manifesto. E dentro desse diálogo, eu acho que há espaço para falar sobre o uso de objetos em um papel de apoio, se é que é.

Será que os museus seriam forçados a oferecer experiências mais significativas e interativas se eles não tivessem uma coleção para exibir? Considere centros de ciência. Eles se encarregam de ilustrar conceitos - gravidade, mudança climática, como o som viaja, etc. Eles estão menos preocupados com as provas restantes de eventos, pessoas ou cultura. Fenômeno baseado em museus de ciência são inerentemente mais experiencial porque eles têm que ser. Eles ilustram processos - verbos - que não podem ser facilmente ilustrados por artefatos estáticos em casos.

O Museu de Ciência e Indústria de Chicago "Você! A experiência "é um grande exemplo. Uma grande questão geral ajuda a enquadrar a exposição: como posso melhorar meu bem-estar? Como poderia uma exposição ser mais relevante? É sobre mim! E isso me mostra como eu trabalho de uma maneira que me envolve - nenhum objeto necessário.

Por exemplo, um jogo chamado "Mindball" ensina aos visitantes como controlar suas ondas cerebrais e usar o relaxamento consciente. O objetivo é "relaxar" o seu adversário. Eu tenho visto você! The Experience ", mas está na minha lista de balde.

A falta de coleções de um museu de ciências e o foco em processos abstratos dão liberdade para explorar ferramentas mais interpretativas? Talvez os museus de história deveriam se concentrar em processos e conceitos abstratos também. Por exemplo, eu adoraria ver uma exposição de museus de história que ajuda os visitantes a explorar os limites da liberdade pessoal. Quando deve a liberdade tomar um banco traseiro para a segurança? Quando é ok para o governo regular minha liberdade? Estas são grandes questões de imagem, mas poderiam ser exploradas através de aprendizagem experiencial usando o contexto histórico. Com Trump no escritório, eu estive me perguntando sobre os limites da liberdade pessoal mais do que nunca. Precisamos de museus para abordar temas como este. Os objetos podem certamente adicionar potência ao punchline, mas não tenho certeza se eles realmente podem me ajudar a sentir o "processo" de liberdade - ou a falta dele.



Aqui estão 3 experiências de museus mais estelares que não dependem de objetos:

1. "Diálogo nas Trevas", Diálogo Social Enterprises (Hamburgo, Alemanha) Os visitantes são guiados por guias cegos, em absoluta escuridão, através de ambientes simulados que representam aventuras na vida cotidiana. A mudança de perspectiva nesta experiência é profunda. Como dizem, "os cegos tornam-se videntes e os videntes tornam-se cegos." O slogan é "mudar a maneira como você vê", que não é um lema de marketing da BS. Essa poderosa experiência realmente mudou minha percepção de pessoas cegas e do mundo cotidiano que eu experimento com a visão. No final do passeio, o nosso guia cego sentado com nós e o nosso grupo em um café escuro e discutiu o que é como ser cego. O que as pessoas revelam no escuro é refrescante honesto.

Eu não sei se isso tecnicamente qualifica como uma experiência de museu desde os passeios são oferecidos em espaços alugados de varejo, mas este programa é educativo e estimulante. Trabalhei brevemente na Premiere Exhibitions em Atlanta (uma empresa com fins lucrativos que alugou "Diálogo" e também exibe "Corpos"), então eu cheguei a ver nos bastidores. Todos os ambientes simulados, que eu experimentei pela primeira vez no escuro, eram drearily ordinário quando nós tínhamos que limpá-los na noite. A magia realmente está na experiência que é criada na imaginação dos visitantes.

Diálogo no escuro é conduzido na maior parte em Europa. Não tenho a certeza por que mais locais americanos não ter apanhado.

2. "Fazendo Fuzileiros Navais" pelo Museu Nacional do Corpo de Fuzileiros Navais (Triangle, Virgínia)

Se você nunca foi para o Museu Marinho apenas ao sul de DC, é realmente uma jóia escondida cheia de elementos experiencial e ambientes imersivos. Eu sou um pacifista bastante extremo, então fiquei surpreso ao me encontrar lá - e curtindo-o. Mas depois de desenvolver uma pequena exposição sobre veteranos das guerras do Iraque e do Afeganistão, fiquei interessado neste lugar. A exposição "Making Marines" coloca você no papel como um marinheiro wannabe e torna transparente todo o processo de retirar sua identidade civil e instilar disciplina. Você tem o que é preciso para ser um fuzileiro naval? Perguntei-me esta pergunta como eu estava em uma cabine de simulador de bootcamp enquanto instrutores de perfuração audível gritou em meus ouvidos. - Ponha os calcanhares juntos! Diga algo! Quantas armas! Olhe para suas armas! "Estímulo confuso e multidirecional foi projetado para preparar os fuzileiros navais para condições psicologicamente estressantes e treinar seus cérebros para se concentrarem. Depois de experimentar este e vários outros desafios, e apesar do meu ceticismo do complexo industrial militar, senti um estranho apelo à ação - um chamado de minha coragem e uma compreensão mais complexa do que significa ser um fuzileiro naval. Impressionante.

3. O Laboratório de Processos foi projetado para ser uma atividade complementar para a exposição "Para o Povo: Projetando uma América Melhor." Eu amo esta exposição, também. Estava cheio de objetos - soluções de design criadas por pessoas muito inovadoras para tornar o mundo um lugar melhor. Mas foi no Laboratório de Processo que eu pensei "Ei, eu poderia fazer isso."

Andrea Jones é um consultor especializado em ajudar os museus a criarem experiências de aprendizagem transformadoras. Ela realiza oficinas e projetos programas experienciais para museus e organizações culturais.

Participe do Peak Experience Lab no Facebook!

Tags Objetos, Experiência, Centro de História de Atlanta, Isabella Bruno, Freedom Rides, Rainey Tisdale, Elee Wood, Trevor Jones, Coleções Ativas, Cooper Hewitt, Diálogo nas Trevas, Museu de Ciência e Indústria de Chicago! A Experiência, Museu Nacional do Corpo de Fuzileiros Navais, Laboratório de Processos




History of "Menorah" honored by Vatican and Jewish Museums. --- História da "Menorá" homenageada por Museus Vaticanos e Judaico.

Vatican City (RV) - "Menorah. Cult, history and myth "is the name of the exhibition inaugurated this Monday (05-15) simultaneously in the Charlemagne Arm of the Vatican Museums (entrance to the left in St. Peter's Square) and the Museum of the Jewish Community of Rome.
Menorah - sacred chandelier with seven arms - is one of the oldest religious symbols of Judaism - AFP


The exhibition, which tells the millennial history of one of the oldest symbols of Judaism - the seven-pointed candlestick - is the result of the first collaboration between the Vatican Museums and the Jewish Museum of Rome and will open until July 23, exhibiting 130 pieces.

Visitors, of course, will not be able to see the original Menorah, a sacred object that has been missing for more than a thousand years, but you can see paintings, sculptures and other objects that have immortalized this piece throughout the centuries, with copies kept in several museums throughout the country world.

For example, from the Palacio de Liria in Madrid comes a Jewish Bible in Castilian, while from the National Gallery in London comes the 16th century oil painting "The Purification of the Temple" by Marcello Venusti. The Jewish Museum of New York has already yielded the oil of the nineteenth-century "The Ruby's Blessing" by Mortiz Daniel Oppenheim.

It is a unique occasion - in the words of the Director of the Jewish Museum of Rome, Alesandra Di Castro - to delve into the history of this enigmatic object in solid gold, whose design was revealed by God to Moses, according to the Book of Exodus.

The object was to be placed in the First Temple of Jerusalem, which was destroyed by order of the King of Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar II, in the year 586 BC.

In AD 70 the troops of Emperor Titus besieged and conquered the city of Jerusalem, looting the second Temple and stealing various valuables, among them the "Menorah", which was later brought to Rome.

This episode is still remembered annually by the Jews during the festival Tisha b'Av.

In Rome, it was immortalized with a relief in the Arch of Titus - in the Imperial Fora - built shortly after the death of the Emperor.

The Vatican Museums displays a copy of this relief depicting the Roman soldiers carrying the "Menorah" withdrawn from the Temple of Jerusalem.

This true treasure was lost in Rome in the fifth century, concretely in the year 455, when the Vandals, led by the Genseric King, penetrated the capital of the Empire looting the city.

Some historians report that the object would have been taken to Carthage, but there is no proof of this. Even because there are numerous other accounts trying to explain their fate, such as the disappearance in the waters of the Tiber River, or even that it has been taken back to Jerusalem.

(JE with information from Ag. Efe)






Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 
A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.

Vamos compartilhar.

Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing.








--br
História da "Menorá" homenageada por Museus Vaticanos e Judaico.

Cidade do Vaticano (RV) – “Menorá. Culto, história e mito” é o nome da mostra inaugurada esta segunda-feira (15/05) simultaneamente no Braço Carlos Magno dos Museus Vaticanos (entrada à esquerda na Praça São Pedro) e no Museu da Comunidade Judaica de Roma.

A exposição, que conta a milenar história de um dos símbolos mais antigos do judaísmo - o candelabro de sete pontas – é fruto da primeira colaboração entre os Museus Vaticanos e o Museu Judaico de Roma e estará aberta até 23 de julho, expondo 130 peças.

Os visitantes, naturalmente, não poderão contemplar a Menorá original, objeto sagrado que está desaparecido há mais de mil anos, mas poderão observar pinturas, esculturas e outros objetos que imortalizaram esta peça ao longo dos séculos, com exemplares custodiados em diversos museus em todo o mundo.

Como por exemplo, do Palácio de Liria, de Madrid, provém uma Bíblia judaica em castelhano, enquanto que da National Gallery, de Londres, é proveniente o óleo do século XVI “The Purification of the Temple”, de Marcello Venusti. Já o Museu Judaico de Nova Iorque cedeu o óleo “The rubbi’s blessing”, do século XIX, de Mortiz Daniel Oppenheim.

Trata-se de uma ocasião única – nas palavras da Diretora do Museu Judaico de Roma, Alesandra Di Castro – para mergulhar na história deste enigmático objeto em ouro maciço, cujo desenho foi revelado por Deus a Moisés, segundo o Livro do Êxodo.

O objeto deveria ser colocado no Primeiro Templo de Jerusalém, que foi destruído por ordem do Rei de Babilônia, Nabucodonosor II, no ano de 586 a.C.

No ano 70 d.C. as tropas do Imperador Tito sitiaram e conquistaram a cidade de Jerusalém, saqueando o segundo Templo e roubando diversos objetos de valor, entre eles, a “Menorá”, que posteriormente foi trazida a Roma.

Este episódio ainda hoje é recordado anualmente pelos judeus durante a festividade Tisha b’Av.

Em Roma, foi imortalizado com um alto-relevo no Arco de Tito – nos Foros Imperiais - construído pouco depois da morte do Imperador.

Os Museus Vaticanos expõe uma cópia deste alto-relevo, que representa os soldados romanos carregando a “Menorá” retirada do Templo de Jerusalém.

Este verdadeiro tesouro perdeu-se em Roma no século V, concretamente no ano de 455, quando os vândalos, liderados pelo Rei Genserico, penetraram na capital do Império saqueando a cidade.

Alguns historiadores relatam que o objeto teria sido levado a Cartago, porém não existe comprovação disto. Mesmo porque, existem numerosos outros relatos tentando explicar o seu destino, como o desaparecimento nas águas do Rio Tibre, ou até mesmo que tenha sido levada de volta a Jerusalém.

(JE com informações da Ag. Efe)