Listen to the text.

quarta-feira, 21 de março de 2018

The Beauty and Horror of Medusa, an Enduring Symbol of Women’s Power. - A beleza e o terror da Medusa, um símbolo duradouro do poder das mulheres.

Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art explores how the snake-haired Gorgon transformed from a hideous monster into a beautiful femme fatale.


 1
Chariot pole finial with the head of Medusa (detail) (Roman, Imperial, 1st–2nd century CE), bronze, silver, and copper, height: 7 1/4 inches, width: 7 inches; diameter: 4 1/4 inches (courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Rogers Fund, 1918)


The earliest portrayals of Medusa show a grotesque part human, part animal creature with wings and boar-like tusks. By the fifth century BCE, that figure from Greek myth began to morph into an alluring seductress, shaped by the idealization of the body in Greek art. Her writhing hair of serpents became wild curls, with maybe a couple of serpents beneath her chin to hint at her more bestial origins.

Today Medusa, with her snake hair and stare that turns people to stone, endures as an allegorical figure of fatal beauty, or a ready image for superimposing the face of a detested woman in power. For more often than not, she’s depicted just as a severed head — a visual that even has its own name, the Gorgoneion — sculpted, painted, or carved being held aloft by her slayer Perseus.


2
Bronze greave (shin guard) for the left leg with Medusa head (Greek, 4th century BCE), bronze, width: 4 7/8 inches; length: 15 3/4inches (courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan P. Rosen, 1991)


Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art draws on around 60 works from the Manhattan museum’s collections to explore the transformation of Medusa and other classical female hybrid creatures, from sphinxes to sirens to Scylla, a sailor-eating sea creature with twelve legs and six necks who makes an appearance in Homer’s Odyssey. On a 570 BCE terracotta stand, Medusa is comically hideous, and fully bearded, sticking out her tongue between two tusks. Meanwhile, a rotation of 1990s Versace fashions presents Medusa as a modern luxury logo.

“Medusa, in effect, became the archetypal femme fatale: a conflation of femininity, erotic desire, violence, and death,” writes Kiki Karoglou, associate curator in the Met’s Department of Greek and Roman Art and organizer of Dangerous Beauty, in an issue of the Met’s quarterly Bulletin on the show. “Beauty, like monstrosity, enthralls, and female beauty in particular was perceived — and, to a certain extent, is still perceived — to be both enchanting and dangerous, or even fatal.”

The story of Medusa shifted over time along with her visage. In Greek mythology, she is one of the Gorgon sisters (derived from the Greek gorgós for “dreadful”), and Perseus uses a reflective bronze shield to defeat her. He then employs her head and its stony glare as a weapon, a tool he subsequently gives to the goddess Athena who wore it on her armor. In a later version, as told by the Roman poet Ovid, Medusa is a beautiful human woman, who is turned into a monster by Athena as punishment after she is raped by Poseidon (woe to mortal women in mythology). A 450–440 BCE red figure pelike container is among the earliest depictions of Medusa as an innocent maiden, with Perseus creeping up on the sleeping Gorgon. The Classical period of Greek art — from 480 to 323 BCE — further associated beauty with danger when Medusa, the sirens, sphinxes, and Scylla all got a little hotter, losing some scales and wings as their bodies were more and more humanized.

3
Installation view of Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

4
Terracotta pelike (jar) with Perseus beheading the sleeping Medusa, attributed to Polygnotos (Greek, 450–440 BCE), terracotta, height: 18 13/16 inches, diameter: 13 1/2 inches (courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fund, 1945)


Madeleine Glennon in a 2017 essay on “Medusa in Ancient Greek Art” for the Met notes that “Classical and Hellenistic images of Medusa are more human, but she retains a sense of the unknown through specific supernatural details such as wings and snakes. These later images may have lost the gaping mouth, sharp teeth, and beard, but they preserve the most striking quality of the Gorgon: the piercing and unflinching outward gaze.”


On a chariot-pole finial from 1st-2nd century Rome, Medusa is almost angelic with her flowing hair (and a pair of snakes peeking through her tresses), yet her penetrating eyes of inlaid silver recall her petrifying gaze. On funerary urns or armor, she was a talisman of protection, those eyes symbolically warding off evil. Even into the 19th century, as the romanticization continued, her eyes did not close. An early 1800s plaster cast from the studio of Antonio Canova shows preparation for the marble statue that now presides over the Met’s European Sculpture Court. In it, a nude Perseus proudly presents the dead Gorgon’s head in one hand, grasping some of the hair that writhes with a few subtle serpents. Her expression is one of surprised, but unblinking, sorrow.


5
Studio of Antonio Canova, “Head of Medusa” (Rome, 1806-07), plaster cast with modern metal rod (courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fletcher Fund, 1967)


Dangerous Beauty boldly mingles objects from across centuries in the compact exhibition. While the wild red locks of Edvard Munch’s 1902 lithograph “The Sin (Woman with Red Hair and Green Eyes),” or Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s “Lady Lilith” (1867) with the Pre-Raphaelite subject brushing her long hair, are more of a stretch in the narrative, they reinforce the ongoing artistic portrayal of women as dangerous through their looks or power. In her 2017 book Women & Power: A Manifesto, classicist Mary Beard explores how the image of Medusa is used to skewer women in contemporary politics, from Angela Merkel to Hillary Clinton (with Trump as Perseus in a popular manifestation). “There have been all kinds of well-known feminist attempts over the last fifty years or more to reclaim Medusa for female power (‘Laugh with Medusa’, as the title of one recent collection of essays almost put it) — not to mention the use of her as the Versace logo — but it’s made not a blind bit of difference to the way she has been used in attacks on female politicians,” writes Beard.


A soundscape in the exhibition composed by Austin Fisher (which you can also hear on the Met’s site) is alternately serene and cacophonous, reflecting how Medusa is pulled back and forth between these seemingly opposed forms. Her story always starts in these objects when her power is possessed, her head severed and turned into a weapon, whether she’s a damsel in distress or a monster. Returning to those startling early images of Medusa, with her bared teeth and frightful snake hair, there’s a narrative here on how transforming her into something benignly ornamental was another level of control. Still no matter her form — or decapitation — her gaze is never averted, looking directly at the viewer as an assertion of her horrifying power that cannot be completely subverted by beauty.

6
Installation view of Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)


7
Installation view of Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)



8
Terracotta two-handled funnel vase with Medusa head (Greek, South Italian, Apulian, Canosan, Early Hellenistic, late 4th–early 3rd century BCE), terracotta, height: 30 3/4 inches; diameter: 17 5/16 inches (courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fund, 1906)




9
Installation view of Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)


Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art continues through January 6, 2019 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1000 Fifth Avenue, Upper East Side, Manhattan).





Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 

A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.
Vamos compartilhar.

Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing







--br via tradutor do google
A beleza e o terror da Medusa, um símbolo duradouro do poder das mulheres.

Beleza Perigosa: Medusa em Arte Clássica no Museu Metropolitano de Arte explora como a Górgona de cabelos de cobra transformou-se de um monstro hediondo em uma linda femme fatale.

1
Poste de carruagem com cabeça de Medusa (detalhe) (Romano, Imperial, 1º a 2º século dC), bronze, prata e cobre, altura: 7 1/4 polegadas, largura: 7 polegadas; diâmetro: 4 1/4 polegadas (cortesia do Metropolitan Museum of Art, Nova York; Rogers Fund, 1918)


Os primeiros retratos da Medusa mostram uma parte grotesca humana, parte criatura animal com asas e presas de javali. No quinto século AEC, essa figura do mito grego começou a se transformar em uma sedutora sedutora, moldada pela idealização do corpo na arte grega. Seu cabelo de serpentes se contorcendo tornou-se cachos selvagens, com talvez um par de serpentes sob o queixo para sugerir suas origens mais bestiais.


Hoje Medusa, com seu cabelo de cobra e olhar que transforma as pessoas em pedra, perdura como uma figura alegórica de beleza fatal, ou uma imagem pronta para sobrepor o rosto de uma mulher detestada no poder. Por mais que não, ela é retratada apenas como uma cabeça decepada - um visual que até tem seu próprio nome, o Gorgoneion - esculpido, pintado ou esculpido sendo mantido no alto por seu matador Perseus.

2
Grevas de bronze (caneleira) para a perna esquerda com cabeça de Medusa (grego, século 4 aC), bronze, largura: 4 7/8 polegadas; comprimento: 15 3/4 polegadas (cortesia do Museu Metropolitano de Arte, Presente do Sr. e Sra. Jonathan P. Rosen, 1991)


Beleza Perigosa: Medusa em Arte Clássica agora no Museu Metropolitano de Arte atrai cerca de 60 obras das coleções do museu de Manhattan para explorar a transformação da Medusa e outras criaturas híbridas femininas clássicas, de esfinges a sereias a Scylla, uma criatura marinha devoradora de marujos com doze pernas e seis pescoços que aparece na Odisseia de Homero. Em uma bancada de terracota de 570 aC, Medusa é comicamente horrível e totalmente barbada, estendendo a língua entre duas presas. Enquanto isso, uma rotação da moda Versace dos anos 90 apresenta a Medusa como um logotipo moderno de luxo.

“A Medusa, na verdade, tornou-se a femme fatale arquetípica: uma fusão de feminilidade, desejo erótico, violência e morte”, escreve Kiki Karoglou, curadora associada do Departamento de Arte Grega e Romana da Met e organizadora da Dangerous Beauty, em um número do boletim trimestral do Met sobre o show. “A beleza, como a monstruosidade, cativa e a beleza feminina em particular era percebida - e, até certo ponto, ainda é percebida - como encantadora e perigosa, ou até fatal”.


A história de Medusa mudou ao longo do tempo junto com seu rosto. Na mitologia grega, ela é uma das irmãs Gorgon (derivada do grego gorgós para "terrível"), e Perseu usa um escudo de bronze reflexivo para derrotá-la. Ele então emprega sua cabeça e seu olhar de pedra como uma arma, uma ferramenta que ele posteriormente dá à deusa Atena que a usava em sua armadura. Em uma versão posterior, como contada pelo poeta romano Ovídio, Medusa é uma linda mulher humana, que é transformada em um monstro por Atena como punição depois que ela é estuprada por Poseidon (ai das mulheres mortais na mitologia). Um contêiner de peles de 450 a 440 aC está entre as primeiras representações da Medusa como uma donzela inocente, com Perseu subindo no Gorgon adormecido. O período clássico da arte grega - de 480 a 323 aC - associou ainda mais a beleza com o perigo quando a Medusa, as sereias, esfinges e Cila ficaram um pouco mais quentes, perdendo algumas escamas e asas à medida que seus corpos se tornavam cada vez mais humanizados.

3
Vista da instalação da Beleza Perigosa: Medusa em Arte Clássica no Metropolitan Museum of Art (foto do autor para Hyperallergic)

4
Terracotta pelike (jarra) com Perseu decapitando a Medusa adormecida, atribuída a Poligotos (em grego, 450–440 aC), terracota, altura: 18 13/16 polegadas, diâmetro: 13 1/2 polegadas (cortesia do Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fundo, 1945)



Madeleine Glennon em um ensaio de 2017 sobre "Medusa na arte grega antiga" para o Met observa que "imagens clássicas e helenísticas de Medusa são mais humanas, mas ela mantém um senso do desconhecido através de detalhes sobrenaturais específicos como asas e cobras. Essas imagens posteriores podem ter perdido a boca aberta, os dentes afiados e a barba, mas preservam a qualidade mais impressionante da Górgona: o olhar penetrante e inabalável para fora. ”


Em um poste de carruagem do século I a Roma do século II, Medusa é quase angelical com seus cabelos soltos (e um par de cobras espreitando através de seus cabelos), mas seus penetrantes olhos de prata incrustada lembram seu olhar petrificante. Em urnas funerárias ou armaduras, ela era um talismã de proteção, aqueles olhos simbolicamente afastando o mal. Mesmo no século 19, enquanto a romantização continuava, seus olhos não se fecharam. Um gesso do início de 1800 do estúdio de Antonio Canova mostra a preparação para a estátua de mármore que agora preside a Corte de Escultura Europeia do Met. Nele, um Perseu nu orgulhosamente apresenta a cabeça da Gorgon morta em uma mão, agarrando um pouco do cabelo que se contorce com algumas sutil serpentes. Sua expressão é de tristeza surpresa, mas sem piscar.


5
Estúdio de Antonio Canova, “Chefe da Medusa” (Roma, 1806-07), gesso com haste de metal moderna (cortesia do Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fletcher Fund, 1967)

A Beleza Perigosa ousadamente mistura objetos de vários séculos na exposição compacta. Enquanto as selvagens madeixas vermelhas da litografia de 1902 de Edvard Munch “O Pecado” (ou “Lady Lilith” de Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1867) com o sujeito pré-rafaelita escovando os cabelos longos, são mais Estender na narrativa, eles reforçam o retrato artístico em curso das mulheres como perigosas através de sua aparência ou poder. Em seu livro de 2017 Women & Power: A Manifesto, a classicista Mary Beard explora como a imagem de Medusa é usada para espetar mulheres na política contemporânea, de Angela Merkel a Hillary Clinton (com Trump como Perseu em uma manifestação popular). “Tem havido todos os tipos de tentativas feministas conhecidas nos últimos cinquenta anos ou mais para recuperar a Medusa pelo poder feminino ('Ria com a Medusa', como o título de uma recente coleção de ensaios quase diz) - sem mencionar o usá-la como o logotipo da Versace - mas não é uma diferença cega para a maneira como ela tem sido usada em ataques a mulheres políticas ”, escreve Beard.


Uma paisagem sonora na exposição composta por Austin Fisher (que você também pode ouvir no site do Met) é alternadamente serena e cacofônica, refletindo como a Medusa é puxada para frente e para trás entre essas formas aparentemente opostas. Sua história sempre começa nesses objetos quando seu poder é possuído, sua cabeça cortada e transformada em uma arma, seja ela uma donzela em perigo ou um monstro. Voltando àquelas imagens iniciais assustadoras de Medusa, com seus dentes nus e cabelos de cobra assustadores, há uma narrativa aqui sobre como transformá-la em algo benignamente ornamental era outro nível de controle. Ainda que não importe sua forma - ou decapitação - seu olhar nunca é desviado, olhando diretamente para o espectador como uma afirmação de seu poder horripilante que não pode ser completamente subvertido pela beleza.

6
Vista da instalação da Beleza Perigosa: Medusa em Arte Clássica no Metropolitan Museum of Art (foto do autor para Hyperallergic)


7
Vista da instalação da Beleza Perigosa: Medusa em Arte Clássica no Metropolitan Museum of Art (foto do autor para Hyperallergic)


8
Vaso de funil de terracota de duas mãos com cabeça de Medusa (grego, sul da Itália, Apúlia, Canosano, início helenístico, 4º final - início do 3º século aC), terracota, altura: 30 3/4 polegadas; diâmetro: 17 5/16 polegadas (cortesia do Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fund, 1906)


9
Vista da instalação da Beleza Perigosa: Medusa em Arte Clássica no Metropolitan Museum of Art (foto do autor para Hyperallergic)




Beleza Perigosa: Medusa em Arte Clássica continua até 6 de janeiro de 2019 no Metropolitan Museum of Art (1000 Quinta Avenida, Upper East Side, Manhattan).

Smithsonian Moves Michelle Obama Portrait Due to ‘High Volume of Visitors’. - Smithsonian transfere o Retrato Michelle Obama Devido ao "Alto Volume de Visitantes".

Michelle Obama was so popular she needed more space.

The distinctive Amy Sherald painting of the former first lady, unveiled at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery last month, has relocated to a different part of the museum due to demand.


“We’re always changing things up here. Due to the high volume of visitors, we’ve relocated Michelle Obama’s portrait to the 3rd floor in our 20th-Century Americans galleries for a more spacious viewing experience,” the National Portrait Gallery tweeted.

The museum has been inundated with visitors since the portraits of the Obamas were unveiled; 176,700 people visited the gallery in February 2018, its biggest month in three years, per Smithsonian Institution data. Last weekend, nearly 45,000 visitors stopped by from Thursday to Sunday.

The Baltimore-based Sherald is an African-American artist known for her unique style, and her portraits tend to underscore themes of social justice. She often paints black skin tones in gray as a way to take away the assigned “color” of her subjects.

Earlier this month, an image of two-year-old Parker Curry staring at the portrait went viral.

“Parker was in front on the portrait, and I really wanted her to turn around so I could get a picture with her, and she genuinely, honestly, would not turn around,” her mother, Jessica Curry, told CNN at the time. “As a female and as a girl of color, It’s really important that I show her people who look like her that are doing amazing things and are making history so that she knows she can do it.”

The photo captured the attention of the former first lady, who invited the Currys to her Washington office for a dance party.







Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 

A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.
Vamos compartilhar.

Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing





--br via tradutor do google
Smithsonian transfere o Retrato Michelle Obama Devido ao "Alto Volume de Visitantes".

Michelle Obama era tão popular que ela precisava de mais espaço.
A pintura distintiva de Amy Sherald da ex-primeira dama, apresentada na National Portrait Gallery do Smithsonian no mês passado, foi transferida para uma parte diferente do museu devido à demanda.

“Estamos sempre mudando as coisas aqui. Devido ao grande volume de visitantes, nós mudamos o retrato de Michelle Obama para o terceiro andar de nossas galerias do século 20 para uma experiência de visualização mais espaçosa ”, twittou a National Portrait Gallery.

O museu foi inundado de visitantes desde que os retratos dos Obamas foram revelados; 176.700 pessoas visitaram a galeria em fevereiro de 2018, seu maior mês em três anos, de acordo com dados do Smithsonian Institution. No último final de semana, quase 45.000 visitantes passaram de quinta a domingo.

Sherald, de Baltimore, é uma artista afro-americana conhecida por seu estilo único, e seus retratos tendem a enfatizar temas de justiça social. Ela costuma pintar tons de pele negra em cinza como forma de tirar a “cor” designada de seus objetos.

No início deste mês, uma imagem de Parker Curry, de dois anos, olhando para o retrato se tornou viral.

"Parker estava na frente do retrato, e eu realmente queria que ela se virasse para que eu pudesse tirar uma foto com ela, e ela genuinamente, honestamente, não iria se virar", sua mãe, Jessica Curry, disse à CNN na época. "Como uma mulher e uma menina de cor, é muito importante que eu mostre a ela pessoas que se parecem com ela que estão fazendo coisas incríveis e estão fazendo história para que ela saiba que pode fazer isso."

A foto chamou a atenção da ex-primeira dama, que convidou os Currys para o seu escritório em Washington para uma festa de dança.





Costumes from 'Black Panther' film will be part of fashion exhibit coming to Heinz History Center. It will then tour museums around the world leading up to the 2019 Academy Awards, and beyond. - Fantasias do filme 'Black Panther' farão parte da exposição de moda que chega ao Heinz History Center. Em seguida, passará por museus em todo o mundo que antecederam o Oscar de 2019, e além.

Pittsburgh will welcome a bit of Wakanda in August when a fashion exhibition featuring costumes by “Black Panther” designer Ruth E. Carter debuts at the Heinz History Center in the Strip District. It will then tour museums around the world leading up to the 2019 Academy Awards, and beyond.

 1
From killer heels to underwear, 
fashion proves to be a hit for museums in Pittsburgh


“Heroes & Sheroes: A Ruth E. Carter Costume Retrospective” will be presented by Ms. Carter and Pittsburgh’s FashionAFRICANA founder Demeatria Boccella. It will showcase costumes from her 30-year career, including Marvel Studios’ blockbuster “Black Panther.” Others include “Selma,” “School Daze,” “Marshall” and “Malcolm X” — which have been in storage until now. A few of Ms. Carter’s other notable credits include Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing” and the “ROOTS” revival.

The Oscar- and Emmy-nominated designer was in town Tuesday to announce the project with FashionAFRICANA, which Ms. Boccella started more than a decade ago with Darnell McLaurin. The pair produces events and other programming across the region that celebrates the African diaspora through fashion, dance and the arts.    


2
Three designs by Ruth Carter.
(Jessie Wardarski/Post-Gazette)


Before “Black Panther” was released in theaters, Ms. Boccella approached Ms. Carter with the idea of collaborating on some sort of fashion project. Beyond “Black Panther,” she was familiar with Ms. Carter’s prestigious portfolio through her work as managing director for the Bill Nunn Theatre Outreach Project. The late Bill Nunn III, a Pittsburgh native and the project’s founder, was cast in a handful of Spike Lee films, perhaps most notably as Radio Raheem in “Do the Right Thing.”

This connection — coupled with FashionAFRICANA’s experience presenting fashion-focused exhibits and the national reputation of the Heinz History Center — earned Pittsburgh the honor of being the first stop for “Heroes & Sheroes,” Ms. Boccella said. Ms. Carter also has a soft spot for Pittsburgh after spending five months here in 2009 working on the action thriller “Abduction” starring Taylor Lautner.

“I got to see the city. I got to love the city. I feel like Pittsburgh is that untouched landscape that has so much beauty and history to it,” she told the Post-Gazette. “It’s the perfect backdrop for a show like mine that travels through history.”

The title of the exhibit isn’t just inspired by the super heroes of “Black Panther,” she explained.

“I say all the time I feel like I’ve been dressing super heroes, heroes, my whole career,” Ms. Carter said. “I think Martin Luther King and Selma and the marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge were heroes and sheroes.”

The show at the History Center will continue through November. It’s slated then to travel to Chicago and has confirmed dates later in New York, Los Angeles and Paris. Stops in Miami, Atlanta, New Orleans, Memphis, London, Milan, Amsterdam and Johannesburg in South Africa are others still under consideration. It’s already attracted interest from national sponsors, including Chance the Rapper’s nonprofit SocialWorks, aimed at youth empowerment.


3
Costumes from 'Black Panther' 
film will be part of fashion exhibit coming to Heinz History Center


“Black Panther” — which has grossed more than $600 million in ticket sales — has already proved to be popular with fashion crowds. At New York Fashion Week in February, Marvel Studios tapped brands, such as Chromat, Sophie Theallet, Tome and LaQuan Smith, to create looks inspired by the film’s characters. They were auctioned off to benefit Save the Children. The event at Industria in the West Village attracted stars from the film, including Lupita Nyong’o, and lines of guests that snaked around the block.  

This will be the latest in a flurry of fashion exhibitions to pop up in Pittsburgh in recent years. The Frick Pittsburgh in Point Breeze mounted “Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe” in 2016 and “Undressed: A History of Fashion in Underwear,” which closed in January after an extended stay.


4
Movie review: 'Black Panther' 
brings the usual African stereotypes to a full stop.


Fashion exhibitions have been a hit at other local institutions, too. In 2014, “Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede” at The Andy Warhol Museum on the North Side chronicled the overlap of these two creatives’ personal and professional lives. The August Wilson Center for African American Culture welcomed “Costumes of The Wiz Live!” by FashionAFRICANA in 2016. “Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion,” the first major fashion exhibition for the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland, saw nearly 70,000 visitors in almost three months last year.

Ms. Boccella hopes “Heroes & Sheroes” further helps Pittsburgh strengthen its stature as a city of arts and culture.

“Having it at the Heinz History Center is a great representation of Pittsburgh as a whole so people can learn more about the city, especially visitors who may be coming to Pittsburgh for the first time,” she said.

Beyond educating the public about Ms. Carter’s expansive body of work, the exhibition’s goal is to inspire the next generation of heroes and sheroes, she added.









Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 

A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.
Vamos compartilhar.

Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing









--br via tradutor do google
Fantasias do filme 'Black Panther' farão parte da exposição de moda que chega ao Heinz History Center. Em seguida, passará por museus em todo o mundo que antecederam o Oscar de 2019, e além.

Pittsburgh vai receber um pouco de Wakanda em agosto, quando uma exposição de moda com figurinos da estilista Ruth E. Carter, do Black Panther, estreia no Heinz History Center, no Strip District. Em seguida, passará por museus em todo o mundo que antecederam o Oscar de 2019, e além.



1

De saltos assassinos a roupas íntimas, 
a moda prova ser um sucesso para museus em Pittsburgh

“Heroes & Sheroes: A Ruth E. Carter Costume Retrospective” será apresentado pela fundadora do FashionAFRICANA, Sra. Carter e Pittsburgh, Demeatria Boccella. Ele exibirá trajes de sua carreira de 30 anos, incluindo o blockbuster “Black Panther”, da Marvel Studios. Outros incluem “Selma”, “School Daze”, “Marshall” e “Malcolm X” - que estão guardados até agora. Alguns dos outros créditos notáveis ​​da Sra. Carter incluem "Do the Right Thing" de Spike Lee e o revival de "ROOTS".

O estilista indicado ao Oscar e ao Emmy estava na cidade na terça-feira para anunciar o projeto com o FashionAFRICANA, que Boccella iniciou há mais de uma década com Darnell McLaurin. A dupla produz eventos e outras programações em toda a região que celebra a diáspora africana através da moda, da dança e das artes.


2
Três desenhos de Ruth Carter.
(Jessie Wardarski / Post-Gazette)

Antes de “Black Panther” ser lançado nos cinemas, Boccella se aproximou de Carter com a ideia de colaborar em algum tipo de projeto de moda. Além de “Pantera Negra”, ela estava familiarizada com o prestigioso portfólio da Sra. Carter através de seu trabalho como diretora administrativa do projeto Bill Nunn Theatre Outreach. O falecido Bill Nunn III, um nativo de Pittsburgh e fundador do projeto, foi escalado para um punhado de filmes de Spike Lee, talvez mais notavelmente como Radio Raheem em "Faça a coisa certa".

Esta conexão - juntamente com a experiência do FashionAFRICANA apresentando exposições focadas em moda e a reputação nacional do Heinz History Center - rendeu a Pittsburgh a honra de ser a primeira parada de “Heroes & Sheroes”, disse Boccella. Carter também tem um fraquinho por Pittsburgh depois de passar cinco meses aqui em 2009, trabalhando no thriller de ação “Abduction”, estrelado por Taylor Lautner.

“Eu consegui ver a cidade. Eu tenho que amar a cidade. Eu sinto que Pittsburgh é aquela paisagem intocada que tem muita beleza e história ”, disse ela ao Post-Gazette. "É o cenário perfeito para um show como o meu que percorre a história."

O título da exposição não é inspirado apenas pelos super heróis de "Black Panther", explicou ela.

"Eu digo o tempo todo que sinto que estou vestindo super heróis, heróis, toda a minha carreira", disse Carter. “Eu acho que Martin Luther King e Selma e os manifestantes do outro lado da ponte Edmund Pettus eram heróis e sheroes.”

O show no Centro Histórico continuará até novembro. A previsão é viajar para Chicago e confirmar datas depois em Nova York, Los Angeles e Paris. As paradas em Miami, Atlanta, Nova Orleans, Memphis, Londres, Milão, Amsterdã e Johanesburgo, na África do Sul, são outras que ainda estão sendo consideradas. Já atraiu o interesse de patrocinadores nacionais, incluindo o SocialWorks, sem fins lucrativos do Chance the Rapper, voltado para o empoderamento de jovens.


trajes de 'Pantera Negra'
filme fará parte da exposição de moda que chegará ao Heinz History Center

"Black Panther" - que arrecadou mais de US $ 600 milhões em vendas de ingressos - já provou ser popular entre as multidões da moda. Na semana de moda de Nova York, em fevereiro, a Marvel Studios escolheu marcas como Chromat, Sophie Theallet, Tome e LaQuan Smith, para criar looks inspirados nos personagens do filme. Eles foram leiloados para beneficiar Save the Children. O evento em Industria no West Village atraiu estrelas do filme, incluindo Lupita Nyong'o, e linhas de convidados que serpentearam ao redor do quarteirão.

Este será o último de uma enxurrada de exposições de moda a surgir em Pittsburgh nos últimos anos. O Frick Pittsburgh em Point Breeze montou “Saltos Assassinos: A Arte do Sapato de Salto Alto” ​​em 2016 e “Undressed: Uma História da Moda em Roupa Íntima”, que foi fechado em janeiro após uma estadia prolongada.


4
Revisão de filme: 'Black Panther' 
traz os estereótipos africanos habituais a um ponto final.

As exposições de moda também foram um sucesso em outras instituições locais. Em 2014, “Halston e Warhol: Silver and Suede” no Andy Warhol Museum, no North Side, narraram a sobreposição da vida pessoal e profissional desses dois criativos. O Centro Wilson de Cultura Afro-Americana recebeu em 2016 a “Trajes do Wiz Live!” Da FashionAFRICANA em 2016. “Iris van Herpen: Transformando a Moda”, a primeira grande exposição de moda do Carnegie Museum of Art em Oakland, viu quase 70.000 visitantes em quase três meses no ano passado.

Boccella espera que “Heroes & Sheroes” ajude Pittsburgh a fortalecer sua estatura como uma cidade de arte e cultura.

"Ter no Heinz History Center é uma ótima representação de Pittsburgh como um todo, para que as pessoas possam aprender mais sobre a cidade, especialmente visitantes que possam vir a Pittsburgh pela primeira vez", disse ela.