sábado, 31 de março de 2018

Museum of Memory and Human Rights, Santiago, Chile: "Inclusive Public Space and Universal Accessibility". - Museu da Memória e Direitos Humanos, Santiago, Chile: "Espaço Público Inclusivo e Acessibilidade Universal".

Since 2014, the MMDH has been making efforts to enable the inclusion and accessibility of people with disabilities (PeSD) to their spaces, starting with a diagnosis of the current difficulties and needs to be met, both structurally and in terms of access to museographic content, and actions have been implemented tending to substantive improvements in the pertinent adaptations.



The creation of the Inclusion and Accessibility line, 2016, responds to this challenge of the institution, to promote a more inclusive society and respect the rights of each and every one of the people of our society, through the generation of equal opportunities for access to education and culture for people with disabilities, increasing their participation in conditions of autonomy and access to information. The development of the Inclusion and Accessibility Line has allowed the execution of projects awarded by the National Fund of inclusive projects of the National Disability Service for the years 2016-2017 and 2017-2018, placing us as an institution that guarantees respect for human rights of people with disabilities and their social inclusion, addressing this condition with a comprehensive approach from a culture of law, fundamental mission of this Museum.


For the Museum of Memory and Human Rights, it is an ethical and justice imperative to prioritize making accessible to the entire community the information that this Museum receives and makes available on a period of our history, September 1973- March 1990, that belongs to all Chileans. For this, the challenge is to gradually eliminate the barriers that restrict the accessibility to this knowledge, enabling the active participation of the PeSD community and making our declaration of the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, in the same way it is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on which the existence of this Museum is based.


The initiatives contemplate improvements in infrastructure and transfer of museographic information, such as the installation of external and internal tactile fingerprints, installation of the HRD in Braille, readjustment in preferential bathrooms, installation of signage in elevators, parking and bathrooms for PeSD, module layout for PeSD at the CEDOC Documentation Center, construction of an accessible reception desk. In relation to accessibility to information; accessible route layout for the permanent exhibition of the Museum, use of descriptive audios, devices and technological platforms (beacons devices, mobile application Lazarillo, Ipads, Smartphone), incorporation of sign language and subtitles in videos, use of braille language in cedulas, manipulation of 3D objects, incorporation of virtual accessibility measures in the website.

The project that is currently underway is related to the redesign and incorporation of inclusive technologies in the Sala Más Más space of the MMDH.

Products and impacts of the projects:

Initiatives that transform the MMDH into a public space of universal accessibility. An inclusive place, which can be visited by everyone, regardless of age, sex, ability or sociocultural contexts.

Museum as an educational space for inclusive cultural development, which responds to social needs and priorities, contributing to the strengthening of public policies.

Generation of goods, services and products for universal learning.

Cutting-edge technological innovation with the use of beacons and mobile Lazarillo application.

The team that has participated in both projects is made up of PeSD, contributing as expert users to solutions that meet their real needs.

It is among the first Museums at national and Latin American level that contributes to the development of an inclusive and accessible culture together with PeSD.

Recognition of the MMDH in the accessible building category, awarded by the National Disability Service in the context of the Inclusive Chile Seal 2017.

Registration of the Museum of Memory and Human Rights in the National Registry of Disability, of the Civil Registry and Identification Service, as a legal entity linked to Disability.

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Museum of Memory and Human Rights in Santiago, Chile

A day to learn about the recent history of Chile could start in the following museum dedicated to the events which took place between 1973 and 1990:

Museo de la Memoria y los Derechos Humanos

(Museum of Memory and Human Rights)

Matucana 501, Santiago,

Open: Tuesday to Sunday from 10am to 6 pm (Free Entrance)

www.museodelamemoria.cl

The first exhibition area shows the events of September 11, 1973 as seen from different angles. On an oversized screen you can view the troops surrounding “La Moneda” (the Presidential Palace) and on little TVs scattered around the room you can watch and listen with headsets to different recordings such as Salvador Allende’s final speech or the filming by a reporter situated in the building next to La Moneda.

Next to this exhibition is one about the victims of violence. Here is an interesting fact that I was not aware of before… Among the victims there were also many children who suffered in different ways. Some witnessed the kidnapping of their parents, some were detained along with them, thousands had to leave the country and lived in exile and some were even tortured, killed or just “disappeared”.

The information brochure I picked up from the museum states that according to the Truth Commission, 150 minors (under the age of 18) were executed for political reasons or killed in protests, 39 “disappeared” and 1,244 children were imprisoned and tortured. While I was looking at the displays, a group of Chileans on a tour through the museum came along side of me. In that group was a woman who had donated one of the letters on display that was written by a family member. All of this was very emotional for the group. Some women started crying and were comforted by others. A difficult experience.

Another very moving part of the museum is the “Velatón” or a candlelight memorial. On a huge wall pictures of people who were killed or who simply “disappeared” during this time can be found. On the opposite side is a mezzanine floor surrounded by electric candles which provides a quiet space to remember and reflect. On a touch screen computer it is possible to find the names of the people and their stories that were investigated by the Truth Commission.

I found an interesting article about the inauguration of the museum. Before the inauguration, there was a lot of public discussion about what the museum should display and whether it should also show the conditions leading up to the eventual military coup. In her inauguration speech former President Bachelet declared that, “the tragedy can have several explanations, but no justification.”

After a visit to the museum, La Moneda seemed so much different than before as I still had the pictures of the attack the presidential palace in my head. Despite different information from friends and publications in travel guides, it was not possible for us to enter La Moneda. I did ask three guards and got three different answers:

1. Just on special days, like Día de la Patria, 2. just with a tour group, or 3. simply never.

If anyone has any other information, please share it with us! Still, it is worth admiring the architecture from the outside. On one of the side roads, passing the palace, is a guard positioned in front of what seemed to be an unimpressive door with the number 80. I later found out that it is the door through which the body of Salvador Allende was taken out.







Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 

A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.
Vamos compartilhar.

Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing









--br via tradutor do google
Museu da Memória e Direitos Humanos, Santiago, Chile: "Espaço Público Inclusivo e Acessibilidade Universal".

Desde 2014, o MMDH vem se esforçando para viabilizar a inclusão e acessibilidade de pessoas com deficiência (PeSD) em seus espaços, a partir de um diagnóstico das dificuldades atuais e que precisam ser atendidas, tanto estruturalmente quanto em termos de acesso. ao conteúdo museográfico, e ações foram implementadas tendendo a melhorias substantivas nas adaptações pertinentes.


A criação da linha de Inclusão e Acessibilidade, em 2016, responde a esse desafio da instituição, de promover uma sociedade mais inclusiva, que respeite os direitos de cada um e de todos os povos de nossa sociedade, através de a geração de oportunidades iguais de acesso à educação e cultura para pessoas com deficiência, aumentando sua participação em condições de autonomia e acesso à informação. O desenvolvimento da Linha de Inclusão e Acessibilidade permitiu a execução de projetos premiados pelo Fundo Nacional de Projetos Inclusivos do Serviço Nacional de Deficiência para os anos 2016-2017 e 2017-2018, colocando-nos como uma instituição que garante o respeito aos direitos humanos dos pessoas com deficiência e sua inclusão social, abordando esta condição com uma abordagem abrangente de uma cultura de direito, missão fundamental deste Museu.

Para o Museu da Memória e dos Direitos Humanos, é um imperativo ético e de justiça priorizar tornar acessível a toda a comunidade a informação que este Museu recebe e disponibiliza num período da nossa história, setembro de 1973 a março de 1990, que pertence a todos os chilenos. Para isso, o desafio é eliminar gradualmente as barreiras que restringem a acessibilidade a esse conhecimento, possibilitando a participação ativa da comunidade PeSD e fazendo nossa declaração da Convenção Internacional sobre os Direitos das Pessoas com Deficiência, da mesma forma. é a Declaração Universal dos Direitos Humanos em que se baseia a existência deste Museu.

melhorias iniciativas contempladas em infra-estrutura e transferência de informações museu, como a instalação podo toque traça placa de instalação externa e interna dos Direitos Humanos em Braille, reajustando banheiros preferenciais, instalação de placas de sinalização que em elevadores, estacionamento e banheiros para módulo de layout PESD PeSD no Centro de Documentação do CEDOC, construção de uma recepção acessível. Em relação à acessibilidade à informação; mapeamento de rotas acessíveis a exposição permanente do Museu, usando descritivo dispositivos de áudio e plataformas tecnológicas (dispositivos balizas, aplicação Lazarillo móvel, Ipads, smartphone), incorporando a linguagem de sinais e legendas para vídeos, uso de Braille em títulos, manipulação de objetos 3D, incorporação de medidas de acessibilidade virtual no site.

O projeto que está em andamento está relacionado ao redesenho e incorporação de tecnologias inclusivas no espaço Sala Más Más do MMDH.

Produtos e impactos dos projetos:

Iniciativas que transformam o MMDH em um espaço público de acessibilidade universal. Um lugar inclusivo, que pode ser visitado por todos, independentemente de idade, sexo, habilidade ou contextos socioculturais.

Museu como espaço educativo para o desenvolvimento cultural inclusivo, que responde às necessidades e prioridades sociais, contribuindo para o fortalecimento das políticas públicas.

Geração de bens, serviços e produtos para a aprendizagem universal.

Inovação tecnológica de ponta com o uso de beacons e aplicação móvel Lazarillo.

A equipe que participou de ambos os projetos é composta de PeSD, contribuindo como usuários experientes para soluções que atendam às suas reais necessidades.

Está entre os primeiros museus a nível nacional e latino-americano que contribuem para o desenvolvimento de uma cultura inclusiva e acessível em conjunto com o PeSD.

reconhecimento MMDH no edifício acessível, concedido pela Disability nacional no contexto do Chile Seal 2017 categoria Inclusive.

Registro do Museu da Memória e dos Direitos Humanos no National Disability Register, o Registo Civil e Identificação, como uma pessoa jurídica relacionada com deficiência.

Museum of Memory and Human Rights in Santiago, Chile

A day to learn about the recent history of Chile could start in the following museum dedicated to the events which took place between 1973 and 1990:

Museo de la Memoria y los Derechos Humanos

(Museum of Memory and Human Rights)

Matucana 501, Santiago,

Open: Tuesday to Sunday from 10am to 6 pm (Free Entrance)

www.museodelamemoria.cl

The first exhibition area shows the events of September 11, 1973 as seen from different angles. On an oversized screen you can view the troops surrounding “La Moneda” (the Presidential Palace) and on little TVs scattered around the room you can watch and listen with headsets to different recordings such as Salvador Allende’s final speech or the filming by a reporter situated in the building next to La Moneda.

Next to this exhibition is one about the victims of violence. Here is an interesting fact that I was not aware of before… Among the victims there were also many children who suffered in different ways. Some witnessed the kidnapping of their parents, some were detained along with them, thousands had to leave the country and lived in exile and some were even tortured, killed or just “disappeared”.

The information brochure I picked up from the museum states that according to the Truth Commission, 150 minors (under the age of 18) were executed for political reasons or killed in protests, 39 “disappeared” and 1,244 children were imprisoned and tortured. While I was looking at the displays, a group of Chileans on a tour through the museum came along side of me. In that group was a woman who had donated one of the letters on display that was written by a family member. All of this was very emotional for the group. Some women started crying and were comforted by others. A difficult experience.

Another very moving part of the museum is the “Velatón” or a candlelight memorial. On a huge wall pictures of people who were killed or who simply “disappeared” during this time can be found. On the opposite side is a mezzanine floor surrounded by electric candles which provides a quiet space to remember and reflect. On a touch screen computer it is possible to find the names of the people and their stories that were investigated by the Truth Commission.


I found an interesting article about the inauguration of the museum. Before the inauguration, there was a lot of public discussion about what the museum should display and whether it should also show the conditions leading up to the eventual military coup. In her inauguration speech former President Bachelet declared that, “the tragedy can have several explanations, but no justification.”


After a visit to the museum, La Moneda seemed so much different than before as I still had the pictures of the attack the presidential palace in my head. Despite different information from friends and publications in travel guides, it was not possible for us to enter La Moneda. I did ask three guards and got three different answers:

1. Just on special days, like Día de la Patria, 2. just with a tour group, or 3. simply never.

If anyone has any other information, please share it with us! Still, it is worth admiring the architecture from the outside. On one of the side roads, passing the palace, is a guard positioned in front of what seemed to be an unimpressive door with the number 80. I later found out that it is the door through which the body of Salvador Allende was taken out.