segunda-feira, 22 de janeiro de 2018

African Masterpieces With the Grace of Kings. - Obras-primas africanas com a Graça dos Reis. - 非洲与国王的恩典的杰作。

THE FACE OF DYNASTY: ROYAL CRESTS FROM WESTERN CAMEROON.

Crests are more than artistic accomplishments; they are avatars of kingship, embodying law and order. 

image 1
CreditVincent Tullo for The New York Times

If there was any silver lining to the recent announcement that the Metropolitan Museum of Art would begin charging a mandatory $25 admission fee to out-of-town visitors this spring, it was this: The charge includes admission to all special exhibitions too. Unlike the leading encyclopedic museums of London, Paris or Vienna, the Met will offer a single ticket for its permanent collection and its rotating displays. Bundling those together allows curators to present shows that may not always be easy crowdpleasers and whose importance cannot be assessed by foot traffic alone.


image 2
A tsesah royal crest. In the Bamileke societies where these masterpieces emerged, the crest was the marker of a king’s authority — and aesthetic similarities suggest that rulers went out of their way to find the best artists. Credit Vincent Tullo for The New York Times

One extraordinary example opened recently in the museum’s African wing. It contains just four works, by artists whose identity cannot be established (plus one bonus item), but they pack enough stunning technique and transcendent authority for a blockbuster of their own.

image 3
Reenactment of a tsesah performance in Bandjoun, western Cameroon, in 1993, organized by the carver and high-ranking official Paul Tahbou. A performer holds the crest atop his head. His body is covered by an indigo resist-dyed ndop cloth. This photograph is the only existing document demonstrating how a tsesah might have been worn. Credit Alain Nicolas

In “The Face of Dynasty: Royal Crests From Western Cameroon,” you’ll find a quartet of massive wooden crowns, known as tsesah crests, that served as avatars of kingship among the dozens of small monarchies of the Bamileke people in the grasslands of northwest Cameroon, near the contemporary border with Nigeria. Each is carved from a single piece of wood and takes the form of a highly stylized face topped by a vast vertical brow. The earliest and most fragile, dating to the 18th century, entered the Met’s collection last year. Its three cousins, of finer finish and about a century more recent, have been lent from the Smithsonian in Washington, the Menil Collection in Houston, and a private collection. Put them together, examine their differences, understand their African political significance and their western aesthetic impacts, and you have a thundering show.

image 4
 Crest, 19th century. A century ago, Picasso fell in love with the stylized features of African sculpture. What he missed was its spiritual, legal, and political power. Credit Vincent Tullo for The New York Times

Only 15 tsesah crests still exist worldwide, and an American museum has never assembled so many at once. Each is a hefty three feet tall; their eyes are rendered as lightly outlined ovals, and the cheeks protrude so sharply as to form a ledge. Noses and mouths comprise simple geometric shapes, cones and spheres and half moons, while the towering brows are festooned with designs of startling intricacy. In the Met’s early example, the brow is shaped like a spackling knife and retains the burl of the wood grain, though its top edge has been splintered over time. In the three 19th-century crests, the brows are carefully incised with rolling waves, in the case of the Menil’s example; interlocking diamonds in the Smithsonian’s; and a modified checkerboard pattern in the privately owned specimen.

image 5
A tsesah royal crest, carved from a single piece of wood, takes the form of a highly stylized face topped by a vast vertical brow. It was an avatar of kingship for the Bamileke people of Cameroon’s Grassfields region, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Credit Vincent Tullo for The New York Times

In the Bamileke societies where these masterpieces emerged, the tsesah crest was the primary marker of a king’s power and authority — and aesthetic similarities in far-flung examples suggest that rulers went out of their way to find the best artists. Courtiers would wear or hold these crests at enthronements, legal proceedings, funerals. (A 27-foot-long resist-dyed cloth, whose deep blue background is overlaid with interlocking crosses and chevrons, is this show’s final object; it would have marked out a seating area for royals.) Scholars believe that a tsesah crest would be passed to a successor, but knowledge remains patchy: all the world’s surviving examples were collected late in African colonial history, and were no longer in ritual use.

image 6
Viewing the royal display cloth (ndop) at the Met. Credit Vincent Tullo for The New York Times


Your first impulse, encountering them at the Met, in stately glass boxes under precise pin lights, will be to think in aesthetic, not ethnographic, terms. The eyes, cheeks and broad semicircular smiles cohere into commanding, larger-than-life abstract faces. African artists’ rendering of complex features into smooth, stylized profiles would later prove decisive for the development of western modernism — notably Picasso’s proto-Cubist art of 1906-09; the hot-colored expressionism of Kirchner and other painters of Die Brücke; and the masquerades of Hugo Ball, Tristan Tzara and other figures of Dada.


Bamileke crests like these, in fact, have a direct modernist pedigree: The Museum of Modern Art showed one example from the Cameroon grasslands as a high-water mark of African creativity in its 1935 show “African Negro Art.” (By chance I saw that particular crest a few months ago, on a visit to the Museum Rietberg in Zurich. It stopped me in my tracks.) New York audiences encountered the crest in a stark gallery, without historical context, in the same way as Cubist or Futurist sculptures.

In the MoMA catalog, the curator James Johnson Sweeney mounted a formalist defense of the crest and works like it — one that still haunts our understanding of African ritual objects when we encounter them in art museums. “In the end,” Sweeney wrote, “it is not the tribal characteristics of Negro art nor its strangeness that are interesting. It is its plastic qualities. Picturesque or exotic features as well as historical and ethnographic considerations have a tendency to blind as to its true worth …. It is as sculpture we should approach it.”

Yet these are more than artistic accomplishments in the formalist sense that Sweeney and other western modernists imagined. They also have legal, political, and diplomatic worth, and it’s critical to think about them as such, lest we repeat the mistakes of earlier primitivists. Thankfully the Met’s curators, Yaëlle Biro and Alisa LaGamma, insist on multifaceted context. Copious wall texts, testimony from a Cameroonian artist whose ancestors carved them, and anthropological photographs all hint at how these crests might have embodied law and order. A true reckoning with the glory of these crests can only take place against the backdrop of their global histories, from Africa to Europe and America, from the royal court to the white cube.

What might it mean for a visitor to the Met, perhaps young, perhaps unaware of the depths of African influence on global modernism, to discover these crests for the first time? How can we ensure that they learn about African artists not just as influences on the all-stars of European painting, but as politically engaged creators whose understanding of art may actually be closer to our own? Universal museums like the Met, for all their geopolitical baggage, have an essential role to play in the fostering of a cosmopolitan citizenry. I hope the Met never abdicates that goal, and that its ticket-takers do not prevent a new generation from seeing these masterpieces.







Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 

A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.
Vamos compartilhar.

Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing.







--br via tradutor do google
Obras-primas africanas com a Graça dos Reis.

A CARA DA DINASTIA: CRESTS REALES DOS CAMARÕES OCIDENTAIS.

As cristas são mais do que realizações artísticas; Eles são avatares de realeza, incorporando lei e ordem.

imagem 1
CreditVincent Tullo para The New York Times

Se houvesse algum revestimento de prata para o recente anúncio de que o Metropolitan Museum of Art começaria a cobrar uma taxa de admissão obrigatória de US $ 25 para os visitantes fora da cidade nesta primavera, era isso: a cobrança inclui admissão em todas as exposições especiais também. Ao contrário dos principais museus enciclopédicos de Londres, Paris ou Viena, o Met oferecerá um bilhete único para sua coleção permanente e seus displays rotativos. Juntar esses juntos permite que os curadores apresentem shows que nem sempre sejam fáceis de multidão e cuja importância não pode ser avaliada apenas pelo trânsito do pé.

imagem 2
Uma crista real tsesah. Nas sociedades de Bamileke, onde essas obras-primas surgiram, a crista era o marcador da autoridade de um rei - e as semelhanças estéticas sugerem que os governantes saíram do caminho para encontrar os melhores artistas. Crédito Vincent Tullo para The New York Times

Um extraordinário exemplo abriu recentemente na ala africana do museu. Contém apenas quatro obras, por artistas cuja identidade não pode ser estabelecida (mais um item de bônus), mas eles embalam bastante técnica impressionante e autoridade transcendente para um sucesso de sucesso.

imagem 3
Reencenação de uma performance tsesah em Bandjoun, no oeste dos Camarões, em 1993, organizada pelo escultor e alto oficial Paul Tahbou. Um artista mantém a crista acima de sua cabeça. Seu corpo é coberto por um pano índigo resistente a tingidas. Esta fotografia é o único documento existente que demonstra como um tsesah poderia ter sido usado. Crédito Alain Nicolas

Em "The Face of Dynasty: Royal Crests From Western Cameroon", você encontrará um quarteto de coroas de madeira maciças, conhecidas como cristas tsesah, que serviram como avatares de realeza entre as dezenas de pequenas monarquias do povo Bamileke nas pastagens de Camarões do noroeste, perto da fronteira contemporânea com a Nigéria. Cada um é esculpido a partir de uma única peça de madeira e assume a forma de um rosto altamente estilizado coberto por uma vasta testa vertical. O primeiro e mais frágil, que data do século 18, entrou na coleção Met no ano passado. Os seus três primos, de acabamento mais fino e cerca de um século mais recente, foram emprestados do Smithsonian em Washington, a Menil Collection em Houston e uma coleção privada. Junte-os, examine suas diferenças, compreenda seu significado político africano e seus impactos estéticos ocidentais, e você tem um show trovejante.

imagem 4
Crest, século XIX. Um século atrás, Picasso se apaixonou pelas características estilizadas da escultura africana. O que ele perdeu foi o seu poder espiritual, jurídico e político. Crédito Vincent Tullo para The New York Times

Apenas 15 cristas tsesah ainda existem em todo o mundo, e um museu americano nunca reuniu tanto de uma só vez. Cada um é um pesado de três metros de altura; seus olhos são representados como ovais levemente esboçados, e as bochechas se sobressaem tão fortemente para formar uma borda. Os narizes e as bocas compreendem formas geométricas simples, cones e esferas e meias luas, enquanto as sobrancelhas imponentes estão adornadas com desenhos de complexidade surpreendente. No exemplo inicial do Met, a testa tem a forma de uma faca espalhafatosa e retém o burl do grão de madeira, embora sua borda superior tenha sido estilhaçada ao longo do tempo. Nas três cristas do século XIX, as sobrancelhas são cuidadosamente incisadas com ondas ondulantes, no caso do exemplo de Menil; diamantes interligados no Smithsonian's; e um padrão de xadrez modificado no espécime de propriedade privada.

imagem 5
Uma crista real tsesah, esculpida em uma única peça de madeira, assume a forma de um rosto altamente estilizado coberto por uma vasta testa vertical. Era um avatar de realeza para o povo Bamileke da região de Grassfields de Camarões, em vista no Museu Metropolitano de Arte. Crédito Vincent Tullo para The New York Times

Nas sociedades de Bamileke, onde essas obras-primas surgiram, a crista de tsesah foi o marcador primário do poder e da autoridade de um rei - e as semelhanças estéticas em exemplos distantes sugerem que os governantes saíram do caminho para encontrar os melhores artistas. Os cortesãos usariam ou mantinham essas cristas em entronedas, processos legais, funerais. (Um pano resistido de 27 pés de comprimento, cujo fundo azul profundo é coberto com cruzamentos e chevrons interligados, é o objeto final deste show, que teria marcado uma área de estar para a realeza.) Os estudiosos acreditam que uma crista de Tsesah seria passou para um sucessor, mas o conhecimento permanece irregular: todos os exemplos sobreviventes do mundo foram coletados no final da história colonial africana e não estavam mais em uso ritual.

imagem 6

Exibindo o pano de exibição real (ndop) no Met. Crédito Vincent Tullo para The New York Times


Seu primeiro impulso, encontrando-os no Met, em caixas de vidro majestosas sob luzes precisas, será pensar em termos estéticos, não etnográficos. Os olhos, as bochechas e os sorrisos semicirculares amplos enquadram-se em rostos abstratos, maiores do que a vida. A representação dos artistas africanos de características complexas em perfis suaves e estilizados, mais tarde, se revelou decisiva para o desenvolvimento do modernismo ocidental - notavelmente a arte proto-cubista de Picasso de 1906-09; o expressionismo de cores quentes de Kirchner e outros pintores de Die Brücke; e os disfarces de Hugo Ball, Tristan Tzara e outras figuras de Dada.


As cristas de Bamileke como essas, de fato, têm um pedigree modernista direto: o Museu de Arte Moderna mostrou um exemplo das pastagens dos Camarões como uma marca de água forte da criatividade africana em seu show de "arte africana africana" de 1935. (Por acaso eu vi essa crista particular há alguns meses atrás, em uma visita ao Museu Rietberg em Zurique. Isso me impediu.) O público de Nova York encontrou a crista em uma galeria rígida, sem contexto histórico, da mesma forma que esculturas cubistas ou futuristas .

No catálogo do MoMA, o curador James Johnson Sweeney montou uma defesa formalista da crista e funciona assim - um que ainda persuade a nossa compreensão de objetos rituais africanos quando os encontramos em museus de arte. "No final", escreveu Sweeney, "não são as características tribais da arte negra nem a estranheza que são interessantes. São suas qualidades plásticas. As características pitorescas ou exóticas, bem como considerações históricas e etnográficas, tendem a cegar o seu verdadeiro valor ... É como escultura que devemos abordá-lo ".

No entanto, essas são mais do que realizações artísticas no sentido formalista que imaginavam Sweeney e outros modernistas ocidentais. Eles também têm valor legal, político e diplomático, e é fundamental pensar neles como tal, para que não repita os erros de primitivistas anteriores. Felizmente, os curadores de Met, Yaëlle Biro e Alisa LaGamma, insistem em um contexto multifacetado. Textos de paredes copiosas, testemunhos de um artista camaronês cujos ancestrais os esculpiam e fotografias antropológicas indicam como essas cristas podem ter encarnado a lei e a ordem. Um verdadeiro cálculo com a glória dessas cristas só pode acontecer no contexto de suas histórias globais, da África à Europa e da América, da corte real ao cubo branco.

O que isso pode significar para um visitante do Met, talvez jovem, talvez inconsciente das profundidades da influência africana no modernismo global, para descobrir essas cristas pela primeira vez? Como podemos garantir que eles aprendam sobre artistas africanos não apenas como influências sobre as estrelas da pintura européia, mas como criadores comprometidos politicamente, cuja compreensão da arte pode estar mais próxima da nossa? Museus universitários como o Met, por toda a sua bagagem geopolítica, têm um papel essencial a desempenhar na promoção de uma cidadania cosmopolita. Espero que o Met nunca abdique esse objetivo, e que os tomadores não impedem uma nova geração de ver essas obras-primas.







-- chines simplificado

非洲与国王的恩典的杰作。


王朝的遗物:喀麦隆西部的皇室。

徽章不仅仅是艺术的成就,他们是王权的化身,体现着治安。

图片1
“纽约时报”的CreditVincent Tullo

如果说最近宣布大都会艺术博物馆今年春天开始向外地游客收取强制性25美元的入场费的话,那是这样的:收费也包括所有特别展览的入场费。不同于伦敦,巴黎或维也纳的百科全书式博物馆,Met将提供永久收藏和旋转展示的单一票。把它们捆绑在一起,可以让策展人展示不一定容易的人群,而且其重要性不能单单由人流来评估。


图片2
一个tsesah皇家冠。在出现这些杰作的巴米莱克社会中,顶峰是国王权威的标志 - 而审美的相似性则表明统治者们走出了寻找最好的艺术家的路。信贷文森特图洛为纽约时报

博物馆的非洲联盟最近开了一个非凡的例子。它只包含了四件作品,由艺术家的身份无法建立(加上一项奖励项目),但他们包装足够的惊人的技术和超凡的权威,为自己的巨片。

图片3
1993年由卡文和高级官员保罗·塔布(Paul Tahbou)组织的在喀麦隆西部的Bandjoun重新表演了一场tsesah表演。一个表演者顶着他的头顶。他的身体被靛蓝抗染色ndop布覆盖。这张照片是唯一的现有文件,展示了如何穿上一个tsesah。信贷Alain Nicolas

在“朝代的脸:喀麦隆西部的皇家嵴”中,你会发现一个巨大的木冠冠,被称为tsesah冠,在几十个Bamileke人的小君主国喀麦隆西北部,靠近与尼日利亚的当代边界。每一件都是由一块木头雕刻而成,并采用高度风格化的脸型,由一个巨大的垂直眉毛覆盖。最早和最脆弱的,可追溯到18世纪,去年进入了大都会的收藏。它的三个堂堂级的表亲,近一个世纪以来一直是从华盛顿的史密森尼(Smithsonian),休斯顿的梅尼尔收藏(Menil Collection)和私人收藏中借出来的。把它们放在一起,研究它们之间的差异,了解它们的非洲政治意义和西方的审美影响,并且你们有一个雷鸣般的表演。

图片4
佳洁士,19世纪。一个世纪前,毕加索爱上了非洲雕塑的风格化特征。他错过的是精神,法律和政治权力。信贷文森特图洛为纽约时报

世界上还只有15个三色旗,而美国的一个博物馆从来没有这么多。每个人都是一个三英尺高;他们的眼睛呈现出轻微勾画的椭圆形,而且脸颊突出得如此尖锐,以至于形成一个窗台。鼻子和嘴巴包括简单的几何形状,锥体和球体和半个月亮,而高耸的眉毛与惊人的复杂的设计花饰。在Met的早期例子中,眉毛的形状像一把铲刀,保留了木纹的毛刺,尽管它的顶部边缘随着时间的推移已经分裂了。在三个19世纪的波峰中,以Menil的例子来说,眉毛被细细地切开,在史密森尼的相互钻石;并在私人拥有的标本中修改棋盘图案。

图片5
一块用一块木头雕刻而成的tsesah皇冠,采用高大程度化的脸型,由一个巨大的垂直眉毛覆盖。这是喀麦隆草地地区巴米莱克人的王位化身,在大都会艺术博物馆的景观。信贷文森特图洛为纽约时报

在这些杰作出现的巴米勒克社会中,这一顶峰是国王的权力和权威的主要标志 - 而在遥远的例子中,审美上的相似性表明统治者为了寻找最好的艺术家而走出困境。朝臣们可以佩戴或持有这些冠冕,法律程序,葬礼。 (一个27英尺长的抗色织布,深蓝色的背景叠加了十字交叉和人字形,这是这个展览的最后一个对象,它将为皇室留出一个座位区域)。学者们认为,传给后继者,但是知识仍然不完整:世界上所有幸存下来的例子都是在非洲殖民历史的晚期收集起来的,不再是仪式上的使用。

图片5
在Met上查看皇家展示布(ndop)。信贷文森特图洛为纽约时报

你的第一个冲动,在精确的针脚灯下,在大气的玻璃箱子里遇到他们,将会以美学而不是民族志的方式思考。眼睛,脸颊和宽阔的半圆形笑容凝聚成指挥,超越生命的抽象面孔。后来,非洲艺术家将复杂的特征渲染成流畅的,程式化的轮廓,后来对西方现代主义的发展具有决定性意义 - 尤其是毕加索的1906 - 09年的原始立体主义艺术;基希纳(Kirchner)和其他DieBrücke画家的热色表现主义;以及雨果·波尔(Hugo Ball),特里斯坦·特扎拉(Tristan Tzara)和达达(Dada)的其他人物的伪装。

巴米莱克这样的顶峰实际上有一个直接的现代主义谱系:现代艺术博物馆在1935年的“非洲黑人艺术”展览上展示了一个来自喀麦隆草原的非洲创造力的高水位的例子。几个月前,这个特别的顶峰在参观了苏黎世里特贝格博物馆,它阻止了我的踪迹。)纽约的观众在一个鲜明的画廊里遇到了这个冠冕,没有历史背景,就像立体派或未来派雕塑一样。

在MoMA目录中,策展人詹姆斯·约翰逊·斯威尼(James Johnson Sweeney)为这个顶峰进行了形式主义的辩护,并且像这样的作品 - 当我们在艺术博物馆遇到他们时,仍然困扰着我们对非洲仪式物品的理解。 “最后,”斯威尼写道,“黑人艺术的部落特征和它的陌生感并不是有趣的。这是它的塑料质量。风景如画或奇特的特征,以及历史和民族志的考虑,都倾向于盲目地看待它的真正价值。这就像雕塑一样,我们应该接近它。“

然而这些不仅仅是斯威尼和其他西方现代主义者想象的形式主义意义上的艺术成就。他们也具有法律,政治和外交的价值,关键是这样看待,免得我们重复早期的原始主义者的错误。谢天谢地,大都会的策展人YaëlleBiro和Alisa LaGamma坚持多方面的背景。丰富的墙壁文本,祖先雕刻的喀麦隆艺术家的证词以及人类学照片都暗示了这些顶峰如何体现了法律和秩序。对于这些顶峰的荣耀真正的推算只能在他们的全球历史的背景下进行,从非洲到欧美,从皇宫到白色立方体。

对于一个来到大都会的访客来说,这可能是什么意思,或许是年轻一些,也许不知道非洲对全球现代主义影响的深度,首次发现这些顶峰呢?我们如何才能确保他们了解到非洲艺术家不仅仅是对欧洲绘画全明星的影响,而是作为政治参与的创作者,他们对艺术的理解可能更接近我们自己呢?象梅特这样的普遍的博物馆,为了他们所有的地缘政治的包袱,在培养一个世界性的公民方面起着重要的作用。我希望这个大都会永远不会放弃这个目标,购票者不会阻止新一代看到这些杰作。

Here’s What Happened to All the Women’s March Signs. Smithsonian Institute collected signs from Women’s March to preserve its place in history. - Aqui está o que aconteceu com todos os sinais de março das mulheres. Smithsonian Institute recolheu sinais da Marcha das Mulheres para preservar o seu lugar na história.

On Saturday, thousands of women will hit the streets across the country for the 2018 Women’s March. They’ll descend on their cities and towns, armed with comfortable walking shoes, water bottles, and signs. After last year’s demonstration in D.C., tens of thousands of technicolor posters littered the city’s streets — they were piled up against fences, propped against buildings, and shoved into overflowing trash bins. And then, they were gone. Well, almost. A few dozen were collected by a small team of curators, to be preserved at the National Museum of American History.

Signs at the Women’s March. Photo: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

“The museum has a long history, stretching back to the March on Washington, of collecting materials from protests, and rallies, and marches, and those occasions when citizens get together to make their voices heard, and exercise their first amendment rights,” Lisa Kathleen Graddy, a curator in the museum’s Division of Political History told the Cut.

On the morning of the march, Graddy and about six of her colleagues fanned out across the National Mall to collect materials they thought would best represent the day, and help preserve it in history.

Photo: Gillian Laub

“Things fall into sort of two categories,” Graddy explained. “There’s the slogans, the imagery you’re expecting to see, the thing’s that are on the tip of everybody’s tongue … Then there are the things that are particularly original, and unique, that are also eye-catching, and you want to try and document.”

According to Graddy, the number of materials — and messages — made their task overwhelming.

“When we were sorting, we were also looking at — okay, this is about science, this is about self-determination, this is about rights, this is specifically about gender … and then we’d bring all the things to the center and sort through what we had to see where we had duplication.”

While they were able to collect a lot of discarded material around the National Mall, Graddy and her co-workers also spent much of the day hunting down specific items they felt would round out the collection, as well as approaching people to see if they would be willing to donate their poster.

Photo: Gillian Laub

“No matter the circumstance, people always have the same response,” Graddy said. “First, they’re startled. They’re stunned that the Smithsonian might be interested in something they made or are carrying, and then most people are pleased. It’s a nice thing to have somebody come up and say ‘We’d like to save that thing you’re carrying for all time.’”

Once the curators felt they had gotten a representative sample of materials, they brought them back to the museum, where they culled them down to about 50 items, including approximately 35 posters with slogans like “Girls just want fundamental rights”, “Military Mom, Latin Immigrant, I’m American,” and “Out of the minivan and into the streets”.

Today, the only Women’s March sign on display is a hand-written Black Lives Matter poster in the museum’s “American Democracy” exhibit. But once each item is processed and given a unique ID number, measured, described, and entered into the museum’s catalogue, they will be available for other museums’ exhibitions, and for the public to use in their publications and in their own research.

As for Graddy’s favorite sign?

“That’s like choosing your favorite child,” she laughed. “There were so many that were amazing, but there was one […] it was covered in images of women suffragists, and used the slogan ‘Shoulder to Shoulder’.”

This Saturday, the museum plans to collect signs from the 2018 Women’s March. If you need inspiration for this year’s protest, check out some of last year’s posters here.

Who knows, maybe your sign will end up in the Smithsonian.
-
Smithsonian Institute collected signs from Women’s March to preserve its place in history.

During the Women’s March on Washington last year, which drew half a million people into the U.S. capital and sparked solidarity marches across the globe, curators from the Smithsonian Institute were quietly embarking on an important project — collecting signs from the protesters to preserve the movement’s place in history.

Lisa Kathleen Graddy, a curator for Division of Political History at the National Museum of American History, said that she and six colleagues went to the National Mall on the morning of the popular mass-protest in an attempt to collect material that would help inform current and future generations about what the march had been like, and what the protest was about. Asking people to donate their signs to history, she recalled, almost always generated an identical heartwarming response.

“First, they’re startled,” said Graddy. “They’re stunned that the Smithsonian might be interested in something they made or are carrying, and then most people are pleased. It’s a nice thing to have somebody come up and say ‘We’d like to save that thing you’re carrying for all time.’”

After sorting through the myriad materials they had gathered, the curators culled their collection to about 50 items — including roughly 35 posters featuring slogans such as: “Girls just want fundamental rights” and “Out of the minivan and into the streets.”

Asked about what her personal favorite sign was, Graddy told The Cut that making such a decision was “like choosing your favorite child.”

“There were so many that were amazing, but there was one […] it was covered in images of women suffragists, and used the slogan ‘Shoulder to Shoulder,’” she said.







Cultura não é o que entra pelos olhos e ouvidos,
mas o que modifica o jeito de olhar e ouvir. 

A cultura e o amor devem estar juntos.
Vamos compartilhar.

Culture is not what enters the eyes and ears, 
but what modifies the way of looking and hearing.








--br via tradutor do google
Aqui está o que aconteceu com todos os sinais de março das mulheres. Smithsonian Institute recolheu sinais da Marcha das Mulheres para preservar o seu lugar na história.

Sinais na Marcha das Mulheres. Foto: Bloomberg / Bloomberg via Getty Images

No sábado, milhares de mulheres irão chegar às ruas em todo o país para a Marcha das Mulheres de 2018. Eles vão descer em suas cidades e cidades, armados com sapatos confortáveis, garrafas de água e sinais. Após a manifestação do ano passado em D.C., dezenas de milhares de cartazes de technicolor espalharam as ruas da cidade - eles foram empilhados contra cercas, apoiados contra edifícios e empurrados para lixeiras. E então, eles se foram embora. Bem, quase. Algumas dúzias foram coletadas por uma pequena equipe de curadores, a serem preservadas no Museu Nacional da História Americana.

"O museu tem uma longa história, que remonta à Marcha em Washington, de colecionar materiais de protestos, manifestações e marchas, e aquelas ocasiões em que os cidadãos se unem para fazer ouvir suas vozes e exercem seus direitos de primeira alteração", Lisa Kathleen Graddy, curadora da Divisão de História Política do museu, disse ao Cut.

Na manhã da marcha, Graddy e cerca de seis de seus colegas se espalharam pelo National Mall para coletar materiais que julgariam melhor representar o dia e ajudar a preservá-lo na história.

Foto: Gillian Laub

"As coisas se enquadram em duas categorias", explicou Graddy. "Há os slogans, as imagens que você está esperando para ver, o que está na ponta da língua de todos ... Então, há coisas particularmente originais e únicas que também são atraentes e você quer tentar e documento. "

De acordo com Graddy, o número de materiais - e mensagens - tornou sua tarefa esmagadora.

"Quando estávamos ordenando, nós também estávamos observando - tudo bem, isso é sobre ciência, isso é sobre autodeterminação, isto é sobre direitos, isso é especificamente sobre gênero ... e então nós trariamos todas as coisas para o centro e escolha o que devemos ver onde tínhamos duplicação ".

Enquanto eles foram capazes de coletar muitos materiais descartados em torno do National Mall, Graddy e seus colegas de trabalho também passaram a maior parte do dia a caçar itens específicos que achavam que iria completar a coleção, além de abordar as pessoas para ver se eles iriam esteja disposto a doar seu cartaz.

Foto: Gillian Laub

"Não importa a circunstância, as pessoas sempre têm a mesma resposta", disse Graddy. "Primeiro, eles estão assustados. Eles estão atordoados de que o Smithsonian possa estar interessado em algo que eles fizeram ou estão carregando, e então a maioria das pessoas está satisfeita. É bom sugerir que alguém venha e diga 'Nós gostaríamos de salvar o que você carrega para sempre' '.

Uma vez que os curadores sentiram que tinham obtido uma amostra representativa de materiais, eles os trouxeram de volta ao museu, onde os abateram até cerca de 50 itens, incluindo aproximadamente 35 pôsteres com slogans como "Meninas só querem direitos fundamentais", "Mãe Militar, Imigrante latino, eu sou americano "e" Fora da minivan e nas ruas ".

Hoje, o único sinal de março da Mulher em exibição é um cartaz escrito na mão da Black Lives Matter na exposição "American Democracy" do museu. Mas uma vez que cada item é processado e recebendo um número de identificação único, medido, descrito e inserido no catálogo do museu, eles estarão disponíveis para as exposições de outros museus e para o público usar em suas publicações e em suas próprias pesquisas.

Quanto ao sinal favorito de Graddy?

"Isso é como escolher sua criança favorita", ela riu. "Havia tantos que eram surpreendentes, mas havia um [...] estava coberto de imagens de sufragistas femininas e usava o slogan" Ombro para Ombro ".

Este sábado, o museu planeja coletar sinais da Marcha das Mulheres 2018. Se você precisa de inspiração para o protesto deste ano, confira alguns dos pôsteres do ano passado aqui.

Quem sabe, talvez o seu sinal acabe no Smithsonian.

Smithsonian Institute recolheu sinais da Marcha das Mulheres para preservar o seu lugar na história.

Durante a Marcha das Mulheres em Washington no ano passado, que atraiu meio milhão de pessoas para a capital dos EUA e provocou marchas de solidariedade em todo o mundo, os curadores do Instituto Smithsonian iniciaram silenciosamente um importante projeto - coletando sinais dos manifestantes para preservar o lugar do movimento na história.

Lisa Kathleen Graddy, curadora da Divisão de História Política do Museu Nacional de História Americana, disse que ela e seis colegas foram ao National Mall na manhã do protesto de massa popular na tentativa de coletar material que ajudaria a informar as atuais e as gerações futuras sobre o que a marcha tinha sido, e sobre o que era o protesto. Pedir às pessoas para doar seus sinais para a história, lembrou, quase sempre gerou uma resposta emocional idêntica.

"Primeiro, eles estão assustados", disse Graddy. "Eles ficaram atônitos de que o Smithsonian possa estar interessado em algo que eles fizeram ou estão carregando, e então a maioria das pessoas está satisfeita. É bom sugerir que alguém venha e diga 'Nós gostaríamos de salvar o que você carrega para sempre' '.

Depois de classificar a quantidade de materiais que eles reuniram, os curadores derrubaram sua coleção em cerca de 50 itens - incluindo cerca de 35 pôsteres com slogans como: "Meninas só querem direitos fundamentais" e "Fora da minivan e para as ruas".

Perguntado sobre o que seu sinal favorito pessoal era, Graddy disse ao The Cut que tomar essa decisão era "como escolher sua criança favorita".

"Havia tantos que eram surpreendentes, mas havia um [...] estava coberto de imagens de sufragistas femininas e usava o slogan" Ombro a ombro ", disse ela.